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blue only appears in English circa 1300.
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Hen Hanna
2018-10-07 15:50:07 UTC
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Unlike other common colours that go back to Old English, blue only appears in English circa 1300. <<<
If this is true, what was the word used (in English) before then ?
b***@ihug.co.nz
2018-10-07 20:02:48 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
Unlike other common colours that go back to Old English, blue only appears in English circa 1300. <<<
If this is true, what was the word used (in English) before then ?
This might give you some ideas

https://oldenglishthesaurus.arts.gla.ac.uk/

as might the Historical Thesaurus based on OED.
Hen Hanna
2018-10-09 04:37:17 UTC
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Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Hen Hanna
Unlike other common colours that go back to Old English, blue only appears in English circa 1300. <<<
If this is true, what was the word used (in English) before then ?
This might give you some ideas
https://oldenglishthesaurus.arts.gla.ac.uk/
as might the Historical Thesaurus based on OED.
thank you.... i'll look that up....


.......... the color blue is a relatively modern invention. In Ancient Greece there was no such word for blue as we know the color nowadays. For example, Homer in the Odyssey described the blue sea as "wine-dark"... The word for 'blue' neither can be found in the Icelandic sagas, the Koran, Ancient Chinese texts and many other ancient sources. The only ancient culture that had a word for blue was the Ancient Egyptians...They were also the only one ancient culture that found a way to produce a blue dye. [5.]

.......

During the early Middle Ages the color blue did not play a big role in the art and daily life of Europe. Only the poor people wore blue clothes, that were colored with poor quality dyes made from woad.

Everything changed in the 12th century (between 1130 and 1140) in Paris when Abbot Suger used cobalt for stained glass windows in the Saint Denis Basilica. Since then the color became known as the "bleu de Saint-Denis". Blue stained glass windows were installed in other famous churches and cathedrals, including Chartres and Sainte-Chapelle in Paris.

_________________________


When the Lamb broke the fourth seal, I heard the voice of the fourth living creature saying, “Come.” I looked, and behold, an ashen horse; and he who sat on it had the name Death; and Hades was following with him. Authority was given to them over a fourth of the earth, to kill with sword and with famine and with pestilence and by the wild beasts of the earth.
— Revelation 6:7-8 NASB


i thought this [pale horse] was blue-ish.
Daud Deden
2018-10-09 17:11:08 UTC
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Blood intraveneuous 'is' blue.

Blue ***@Spn ~ ***@Azt or Bsq : blood
***@Ltn: blood ~ cyan(gla.ze/fluid)

moving water/blood is blue, pond water is green, ponded or extra-venuous blood is brown-brick.
Daud Deden
2018-10-09 19:24:44 UTC
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Woad ~ od.ol/watar/wort?

Transparent (unlike milk) through skin (as skyblue veins) but when excised became red and then dead, brick.

Blue was holy/otli/odol/Azul, the color of the most sacred thread of the priestly garments of the Hebrews of Zion/cyan.
Daud Deden
2018-10-09 19:36:35 UTC
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Word Origin and History for wort. "a plant," Old English wyrt "root, herb," from Proto-Germanic *wurtiz (cf. Old Saxon wurt, Old Norse, Danish urt, Old High German wurz "plant, herb," German Wurz, Gothic waurts, Old Norse rot "root"), from PIE root *wrad- "twig, root" (see radish). St. John's wort attested from 15c.
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Wort comes from swollen (cf ***@Hebrew) root, tuber/rhyzome full of water & starch. The link of water, plant root, blue, blood is obvious.

Except to cubicled Linguists lost in their ikipedias & ictionaries.
Mścisław Wojna-Bojewski
2018-10-10 09:23:09 UTC
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Post by Daud Deden
Blood intraveneuous 'is' blue.
moving water/blood is blue, pond water is green, ponded or extra-venuous blood is brown-brick.
Get away from here, kid. This is for grown-ups discussing important things. Shouldn't a boy your age be out playing balls, or something?
Daud Deden
2018-10-10 22:43:15 UTC
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Post by Mścisław Wojna-Bojewski
Post by Daud Deden
Blood intraveneuous 'is' blue.
moving water/blood is blue, pond water is green, ponded or extra-venuous blood is brown-brick.
Get away from here, kid. This is for grown-ups discussing important things. Shouldn't a boy your age be out playing balls, or something?
Troll much, fool?

l***@gmail.com
2018-10-09 18:44:03 UTC
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Unlike other common colours that go back to Old English, blue only appears in English circa 1300.
If this is true, what was the word used (in English) before then?
Did they use a specific word for blue? The Germanic languages have a lot of bl- words, meaning something like "without colour": blond, blue, blind, black, Dutch blank, bleek etc., but "blood" is a conspicuous exception (the French word "bleu" probably comes from Franconian, like a few other colour names: gris, brun, blanc, blond).
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