Discussion:
Plains
Add Reply
Daud Deden
2018-10-02 00:30:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Pampas: early 18th century: via Spanish from Quechua pampa ‘plain.’ Grassy flat lowland plains, prairie.

Savannah: mid 16th century: from Spanish sabana, from Taino zavana 'treeless plain'. Grassy lowland plains. In U.S. use, especially in Florida, "a tract of low-lying marshy ground" (1670s). eg. Everglades

Steppe: From German Steppe or French steppe, in turn from Russian степь (stepʹ, “flat grassy plain”) or Ukrainian степ (step). There is no generally accepted earlier etymology, but there is a speculative Old East Slavic reconstruction *сътепь (sŭtepĭ, “trampled place, flat, bare”), related to топот (topot), топтать (toptatĭ).

The grasslands of Eastern Europe and Asia. More properly, the name given vast cold, dry grass-plains.

Veld: Borrowed from Afrikaans veld, from Dutch veld, veldt (“field”). From Middle Dutch velt (“field”), from Old Dutch feld, felt, from Proto-Germanic *felþą, from Proto-Indo-European *pelh₂-. [DD: cf pelt/velvet: grass = fur] Cognates include West Frisian fjild, English field and German Feld.[1]The open pasture land or grassland of South Africa and neighboring countries.

Prairie: tract of level or undulating grassland in North America, by 1773, from French prairie "meadow, grassland," from Old French praerie "meadow, pastureland" (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *prataria, from Latin pratum "meadow," originally "a hollow." The word existed in Middle English as prayere, but was lost and reborrowed to describe the American plains.

Pasture: c. 1300, "grass eaten by cattle," from Old French pasture "fodder, grass eaten by cattle" (12c., Modern French pâture), from Late Latin pastura "a feeding, grazing," from Latin pastus, past participle of pascere "to feed, graze," from PIE root *pa- "to feed." Meaning "land covered with vegetation suitable for grazing" is from early 14c.

Paleo-etymology:

savanna/zavana
pampa
steppe/sutepi/stamp/***@Mongol:stamp

stmba/xyuambua ~ sieve/shower/flour of sifted grains-ground/stampede

veld/phelt/pelt/felt/furred/***@Arb/aura/ahura

grassland/grazeland
pasture fodder, graze
prairie *prataria, from Latin pratum "meadow," originally "a hollow."

thwaite: "cleared land," 1620s, from Old Norse or Old Danish þveit "a clearing, meadow, paddock," literally "a cutting, cut-piece" (related to Old English þwitan "to cut, cut off;" see whittle). Always a rare word and now obsolete, but frequently encountered in place names, but "It is unclear whether the base meaning was 'something cut off, detached piece of land,' or 'something cut down, felled tree' ..." [Cambridge Dictionary of English Place-Names].
Daud Deden
2018-10-02 02:22:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Tamp, trample, tram, stamp, tump(line), stampede, tamaga, step, -***@Fr, -ped-, perambulate, ~ camp, ***@Mb: thicket, ***@Mb: animal.
Ramp, ram(Vb)

Tipi used in plains, wigwam in forest.
***@Sapmi: forest conic tent
Daud Deden
2018-10-02 08:32:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Daud Deden
Pampas: early 18th century: via Spanish from Quechua pampa ‘plain.’ Grassy flat lowland plains, prairie.
Savannah: mid 16th century: from Spanish sabana, from Taino zavana 'treeless plain'. Grassy lowland plains. In U.S. use, especially in Florida, "a tract of low-lying marshy ground" (1670s). eg. Everglades
Steppe: From German Steppe or French steppe, in turn from Russian степь (stepʹ, “flat grassy plain”) or Ukrainian степ (step). There is no generally accepted earlier etymology, but there is a speculative Old East Slavic reconstruction *сътепь (sŭtepĭ, “trampled place, flat, bare”), related to топот (topot), топтать (toptatĭ).
The grasslands of Eastern Europe and Asia. More properly, the name given vast cold, dry grass-plains.
Veld: Borrowed from Afrikaans veld, from Dutch veld, veldt (“field”). From Middle Dutch velt (“field”), from Old Dutch feld, felt, from Proto-Germanic *felþą, from Proto-Indo-European *pelh₂-. [DD: cf pelt/velvet: grass = fur] Cognates include West Frisian fjild, English field and German Feld.[1]The open pasture land or grassland of South Africa and neighboring countries.
Prairie: tract of level or undulating grassland in North America, by 1773, from French prairie "meadow, grassland," from Old French praerie "meadow, pastureland" (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *prataria, from Latin pratum "meadow," originally "a hollow." The word existed in Middle English as prayere, but was lost and reborrowed to describe the American plains.
Pasture: c. 1300, "grass eaten by cattle," from Old French pasture "fodder, grass eaten by cattle" (12c., Modern French pâture), from Late Latin pastura "a feeding, grazing," from Latin pastus, past participle of pascere "to feed, graze," from PIE root *pa- "to feed." Meaning "land covered with vegetation suitable for grazing" is from early 14c.
savanna/zavana
pampa
stmba/xyuambua ~ sieve/shower/flour of sifted grains-ground/stampede
grassland/grazeland
pasture fodder, graze
prairie *prataria, from Latin pratum "meadow," originally "a hollow."
thwaite: "cleared land," 1620s, from Old Norse or Old Danish þveit "a clearing, meadow, paddock," literally "a cutting, cut-piece" (related to Old English þwitan "to cut, cut off;" see whittle). Always a rare word and now obsolete, but frequently encountered in place names, but "It is unclear whether the base meaning was 'something cut off, detached piece of land,' or 'something cut down, felled tree' ..." [Cambridge Dictionary of English Place-Names].
Tamp, trample, tram, stamp,

***@Mly: grass

***@Mly: a sharp-edged C4 grass which often invades untended rainforest clearings

Bamboo: fast-growing noded tall-grass.

tump(line), stampede, tamaga, step, -***@Fr, -ped-, perambulate, ~ camp, ***@Mb: thicket, ***@Mb: animal.

Ramp, ram(Vb)

Tipi used in plains, wigwam in forest.

***@Sapmi: forest conic tent
Daud Deden
2018-10-02 17:45:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Daud Deden
Post by Daud Deden
Pampas: early 18th century: via Spanish from Quechua pampa ‘plain.’ Grassy flat lowland plains, prairie.
Savannah: mid 16th century: from Spanish sabana, from Taino zavana 'treeless plain'. Grassy lowland plains. In U.S. use, especially in Florida, "a tract of low-lying marshy ground" (1670s). eg. Everglades
Steppe: From German Steppe or French steppe, in turn from Russian степь (stepʹ, “flat grassy plain”) or Ukrainian степ (step). There is no generally accepted earlier etymology, but there is a speculative Old East Slavic reconstruction *сътепь (sŭtepĭ, “trampled place, flat, bare”), related to топот (topot), топтать (toptatĭ).
The grasslands of Eastern Europe and Asia. More properly, the name given vast cold, dry grass-plains.
Veld: Borrowed from Afrikaans veld, from Dutch veld, veldt (“field”). From Middle Dutch velt (“field”), from Old Dutch feld, felt, from Proto-Germanic *felþą, from Proto-Indo-European *pelh₂-. [DD: cf pelt/velvet: grass = fur] Cognates include West Frisian fjild, English field and German Feld.[1]The open pasture land or grassland of South Africa and neighboring countries.
Prairie: tract of level or undulating grassland in North America, by 1773, from French prairie "meadow, grassland," from Old French praerie "meadow, pastureland" (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *prataria, from Latin pratum "meadow," originally "a hollow." The word existed in Middle English as prayere, but was lost and reborrowed to describe the American plains.
Pasture: c. 1300, "grass eaten by cattle," from Old French pasture "fodder, grass eaten by cattle" (12c., Modern French pâture), from Late Latin pastura "a feeding, grazing," from Latin pastus, past participle of pascere "to feed, graze," from PIE root *pa- "to feed." Meaning "land covered with vegetation suitable for grazing" is from early 14c.
savanna/zavana
pampa
stmba/xyuambua ~ sieve/shower/flour of sifted grains-ground/stampede
grassland/grazeland
pasture fodder, graze
prairie *prataria, from Latin pratum "meadow," originally "a hollow."
thwaite: "cleared land," 1620s, from Old Norse or Old Danish þveit "a clearing, meadow, paddock," literally "a cutting, cut-piece" (related to Old English þwitan "to cut, cut off;" see whittle). Always a rare word and now obsolete, but frequently encountered in place names, but "It is unclear whether the base meaning was 'something cut off, detached piece of land,' or 'something cut down, felled tree' ..." [Cambridge Dictionary of English Place-Names].
Tamp, trample, tram, stamp,
Scrum (rugby)
Post by Daud Deden
Bamboo: fast-growing noded tall-grass.
Ramp, ram(Vb)
Tipi used in plains, wigwam in forest.
Loading...