Discussion:
Flowing with milk and honey
(too old to reply)
Daud Deden
2017-10-28 20:44:14 UTC
Permalink
***@S&TB: "The Hebrew for flowing with milk and honey is: zavat khalav u'dvash. Khalav or chalav is milk. Devash or debash is honey. The word "zavat" also has the meaning oozing, or gushing"
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My interpretation:

Zavat ~ sabath = spilleth, the rest

Chalab ~ (Kh/Ch)ala(v/b) ~ Xalav
Xyuambuatluaxyua (keyword)
XyuA.mbua.tLAxyVa: sieve.mother.leak > mVlk

Originally from BLX: breast, bless, press, leche ***@Sp: white milk, i(m)bo(l)***@Pirahã, Amazon: milky,  ***@PIE: milk, ***@Mbuti: dome hut, ***@Uighur: hillock, ***@Hebrew: breath

(xyua)mBuatLuaXyua (keyword)

I notice a missing link: lamb & ***@Malay: cow requires a shift or reversal: Luambua(xyua) that would match the Lemba tribe of African Hebrews. Another triliteral permutation, I guess.

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https://www.biblestudytools.com/lexicons/hebrew/kjv/chalab.html 
Strong's Number: 02461
Word Origin blx
from the same as (02459)
Transliterated Word
TDNT Entry
Chalab
TWOT - 650a
Daud Deden
2017-10-28 21:26:44 UTC
Permalink
Addendum:

Zavat = sabbath/shabbo = spilleth-over-flow/expell/express = spout/pout/pour-out-(the-rest) = fount/fuente ~? [uncertain linkage](p/f)oundry = ***@Venice/ghetto
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Post by Daud Deden
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Zavat ~ sabath = spilleth, the rest
Chalab ~ (Kh/Ch)ala(v/b) ~ Xalav
Xyuambuatluaxyua (keyword)
XyuA.mbua.tLAxyVa: sieve.mother.leak > mVlk
(xyua)mBuatLuaXyua (keyword)
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https://www.biblestudytools.com/lexicons/hebrew/kjv/chalab.html 
Strong's Number: 02461
Word Origin blx
from the same as (02459)
Transliterated Word
TDNT Entry
Chalab
TWOT - 650a
Daud Deden
2017-10-31 16:30:30 UTC
Permalink
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Post by Daud Deden
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Zavat ~ sabath = spilleth, the rest
Chalab ~ (Kh/Ch)ala(v/b) ~ Xalav
Xyuambuatluaxyua (keyword)
XyuA.mbua.tLAxyVa: sieve.mother.leak > mVlk
(xyua)mBuatLuaXyua (keyword)
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https://www.biblestudytools.com/lexicons/hebrew/kjv/chalab.html 
Strong's Number: 02461
Word Origin blx
from the same as (02459)
Transliterated Word
TDNT Entry
Chalab
TWOT - 650a
Xy.lua(m)bua si.lubr silver (***@Basque)
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Reconstruction:Proto-Germanic/silubr%C4%85
xy/shine + lubr(+icate)/***@Latin: to wash/lavatorium=***@Spanish:launder ~ (f)luid ~ loo
Daud Deden
2017-10-31 16:38:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Daud Deden
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Post by Daud Deden
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Zavat ~ sabath = spilleth, the rest
Chalab ~ (Kh/Ch)ala(v/b) ~ Xalav
Xyuambuatluaxyua (keyword)
XyuA.mbua.tLAxyVa: sieve.mother.leak > mVlk
(xyua)mBuatLuaXyua (keyword)
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https://www.biblestudytools.com/lexicons/hebrew/kjv/chalab.html 
Strong's Number: 02461
Word Origin blx
from the same as (02459)
Transliterated Word
TDNT Entry
Chalab
TWOT - 650a
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Reconstruction:Proto-Germanic/silubr%C4%85
murcié***@Spanish: bat. Drinks 'thick' fluids: juices, nectars, blood.
murcie- ~ milky/murky/muddy/bloody
-lagos ~ lact/lick/liquid/lake ~ ***@Malay: body of water eg. ocean, lake
b***@ihug.co.nz
2017-10-31 20:38:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Daud Deden
Post by Daud Deden
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Post by Daud Deden
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Zavat ~ sabath = spilleth, the rest
Chalab ~ (Kh/Ch)ala(v/b) ~ Xalav
Xyuambuatluaxyua (keyword)
XyuA.mbua.tLAxyVa: sieve.mother.leak > mVlk
(xyua)mBuatLuaXyua (keyword)
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https://www.biblestudytools.com/lexicons/hebrew/kjv/chalab.html 
Strong's Number: 02461
Word Origin blx
from the same as (02459)
Transliterated Word
TDNT Entry
Chalab
TWOT - 650a
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Reconstruction:Proto-Germanic/silubr%C4%85
Actually what most bats eat is bugs.
Post by Daud Deden
murcie- ~ milky/murky/muddy/bloody
So DD goes up against the Neo-Etymologists, who will say that it's
from mur- 'mouse' and ciego 'blind'. Are they wrong? Or has it been
"overformed" on the basis of murky-licky archetypes?
Daud Deden
2017-11-01 16:07:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
Post by Daud Deden
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Post by Daud Deden
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Zavat ~ sabath = spilleth, the rest
Chalab ~ (Kh/Ch)ala(v/b) ~ Xalav
Xyuambuatluaxyua (keyword)
XyuA.mbua.tLAxyVa: sieve.mother.leak > mVlk
(xyua)mBuatLuaXyua (keyword)
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https://www.biblestudytools.com/lexicons/hebrew/kjv/chalab.html 
Strong's Number: 02461
Word Origin blx
from the same as (02459)
Transliterated Word
TDNT Entry
Chalab
TWOT - 650a
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Reconstruction:Proto-Germanic/silubr%C4%85
Actually what most bats eat is bugs.
Post by Daud Deden
murcie- ~ milky/murky/muddy/bloody
So DD goes up against the Neo-Etymologists, who will say that it's
from mur- 'mouse' and ciego 'blind'. Are they wrong? Or has it been
"overformed" on the basis of murky-licky archetypes?
Thanks Ross. Indeed many bats eat flying insects, though the nectar/blood/juice drinkers are more obvious (non-mobile vs fast flight). Most mice associated with human settlement are gray furred, murky, again originally from milk.y. Ciego is new to me, sounds like Xya.go/shine.gone->sight.gone, guessing.
b***@ihug.co.nz
2017-11-01 21:27:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Daud Deden
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
Post by Daud Deden
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Post by Daud Deden
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Zavat ~ sabath = spilleth, the rest
Chalab ~ (Kh/Ch)ala(v/b) ~ Xalav
Xyuambuatluaxyua (keyword)
XyuA.mbua.tLAxyVa: sieve.mother.leak > mVlk
(xyua)mBuatLuaXyua (keyword)
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https://www.biblestudytools.com/lexicons/hebrew/kjv/chalab.html 
Strong's Number: 02461
Word Origin blx
from the same as (02459)
Transliterated Word
TDNT Entry
Chalab
TWOT - 650a
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Reconstruction:Proto-Germanic/silubr%C4%85
Actually what most bats eat is bugs.
Post by Daud Deden
murcie- ~ milky/murky/muddy/bloody
So DD goes up against the Neo-Etymologists, who will say that it's
from mur- 'mouse' and ciego 'blind'. Are they wrong? Or has it been
"overformed" on the basis of murky-licky archetypes?
Thanks Ross. Indeed many bats eat flying insects, though the nectar/blood/juice drinkers are more obvious (non-mobile vs fast flight). Most mice associated with human settlement are gray furred, murky, again originally from milk.y. Ciego is new to me, sounds like Xya.go/shine.gone->sight.gone, guessing.
Regular development from Latin caecus, probably originally 'one-eyed'.
Daud Deden
2017-11-01 23:06:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
Post by Daud Deden
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Post by Daud Deden
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Zavat ~ sabath = spilleth, the rest
Chalab ~ (Kh/Ch)ala(v/b) ~ Xalav
Xyuambuatluaxyua (keyword)
XyuA.mbua.tLAxyVa: sieve.mother.leak > mVlk
(xyua)mBuatLuaXyua (keyword)
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https://www.biblestudytools.com/lexicons/hebrew/kjv/chalab.html 
Strong's Number: 02461
Word Origin blx
from the same as (02459)
Transliterated Word
TDNT Entry
Chalab
TWOT - 650a
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Reconstruction:Proto-Germanic/silubr%C4%85
Actually what most bats eat is bugs.
Post by Daud Deden
murcie- ~ milky/murky/muddy/bloody
So DD goes up against the Neo-Etymologists, who will say that it's
from mur- 'mouse' and ciego 'blind'. Are they wrong? Or has it been
"overformed" on the basis of murky-licky archetypes?
Thanks Ross. Indeed many bats eat flying insects, though the nectar/blood/juice drinkers are more obvious (non-mobile vs fast flight). Most mice associated with human settlement are gray furred, murky, again originally from milk.y. Ciego is new to me, sounds like Xya.go/shine.gone->sight.gone, guessing.
Regular development from Latin caecus, probably originally 'one-eyed'.
caecum/***@Latin: A sac or bodily cavity with only one opening.
cf. cul-de-sac
cf. Proto-Germanic *kunton, ... PIE root *geu- "hollow place," still others to PIE root *gwen- "woman."

~ gen(et/d)/kin(d)/***@Lusu, W Afr: woman/gyne/***@Tahiti, Polyn.: woman

***@Dutch: literally "cave of love"

grotto/grot/***@Malay:cave <reverse> evac, vag/bag/***@Indonesian:bag

Bats tend to live in caves.
b***@ihug.co.nz
2017-11-01 23:52:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Daud Deden
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
Post by Daud Deden
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Post by Daud Deden
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Zavat ~ sabath = spilleth, the rest
Chalab ~ (Kh/Ch)ala(v/b) ~ Xalav
Xyuambuatluaxyua (keyword)
XyuA.mbua.tLAxyVa: sieve.mother.leak > mVlk
(xyua)mBuatLuaXyua (keyword)
-
https://www.biblestudytools.com/lexicons/hebrew/kjv/chalab.html 
Strong's Number: 02461
Word Origin blx
from the same as (02459)
Transliterated Word
TDNT Entry
Chalab
TWOT - 650a
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Reconstruction:Proto-Germanic/silubr%C4%85
Actually what most bats eat is bugs.
Post by Daud Deden
murcie- ~ milky/murky/muddy/bloody
So DD goes up against the Neo-Etymologists, who will say that it's
from mur- 'mouse' and ciego 'blind'. Are they wrong? Or has it been
"overformed" on the basis of murky-licky archetypes?
Thanks Ross. Indeed many bats eat flying insects, though the nectar/blood/juice drinkers are more obvious (non-mobile vs fast flight). Most mice associated with human settlement are gray furred, murky, again originally from milk.y. Ciego is new to me, sounds like Xya.go/shine.gone->sight.gone, guessing.
Regular development from Latin caecus, probably originally 'one-eyed'.
from intestinum caecum; neuter form of the word for 'blind', cf. blind alley
Post by Daud Deden
cf. cul-de-sac
Hey, I thought you didn't do comparison! So what are we supposed to compare
here? They both have two c's? ("No, no, listen!"). Oh, so the English
Post by Daud Deden
cf. Proto-Germanic *kunton, ... PIE root *geu- "hollow place," still others to PIE root *gwen- "woman."
Still other what?
You're saying there is a language called Lusu in West Africa, and their
word for woman is "guinea"? Are you sure it isn't a language from Guinea
(not a language, a country) in West Africa, where the word for woman is "lusu"?
Check your notes.
'Vahine' may look a bit like 'gyne', but it actually comes from *ba-binay.
Never mind, I'm sure you'll find another home for it.
Wow! That was fast! So grotto/grot connects to gua by...uh, starting with
g-. Then we reverse! (An old trick of Franz's, hope he doesn't mind you
using it.) But wait: reverse what? Reversing gua would give aug; but you
want uag, don't you? So, okay, not "reverse" but "scramble the letters
around a bit". This gives us evac, vag, bag and ba. Ba? I can't find
an Indonesian ba meaning 'bag' in anything close to hand. Where did you
pick it up?
Post by Daud Deden
Bats tend to live in caves.
So that's why they're called murcielago!
But what happened to murky-licky? Double-overforming?
DKleinecke
2017-11-02 03:36:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
Post by Daud Deden
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Post by Daud Deden
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Zavat ~ sabath = spilleth, the rest
Chalab ~ (Kh/Ch)ala(v/b) ~ Xalav
Xyuambuatluaxyua (keyword)
XyuA.mbua.tLAxyVa: sieve.mother.leak > mVlk
(xyua)mBuatLuaXyua (keyword)
-
https://www.biblestudytools.com/lexicons/hebrew/kjv/chalab.html 
Strong's Number: 02461
Word Origin blx
from the same as (02459)
Transliterated Word
TDNT Entry
Chalab
TWOT - 650a
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Reconstruction:Proto-Germanic/silubr%C4%85
Actually what most bats eat is bugs.
Post by Daud Deden
murcie- ~ milky/murky/muddy/bloody
So DD goes up against the Neo-Etymologists, who will say that it's
from mur- 'mouse' and ciego 'blind'. Are they wrong? Or has it been
"overformed" on the basis of murky-licky archetypes?
Thanks Ross. Indeed many bats eat flying insects, though the nectar/blood/juice drinkers are more obvious (non-mobile vs fast flight). Most mice associated with human settlement are gray furred, murky, again originally from milk.y. Ciego is new to me, sounds like Xya.go/shine.gone->sight.gone, guessing.
Regular development from Latin caecus, probably originally 'one-eyed'.
from intestinum caecum; neuter form of the word for 'blind', cf. blind alley
Post by Daud Deden
cf. cul-de-sac
Hey, I thought you didn't do comparison! So what are we supposed to compare
here? They both have two c's? ("No, no, listen!"). Oh, so the English
Post by Daud Deden
cf. Proto-Germanic *kunton, ... PIE root *geu- "hollow place," still others to PIE root *gwen- "woman."
Still other what?
You're saying there is a language called Lusu in West Africa, and their
word for woman is "guinea"? Are you sure it isn't a language from Guinea
(not a language, a country) in West Africa, where the word for woman is "lusu"?
Check your notes.
'Vahine' may look a bit like 'gyne', but it actually comes from *ba-binay.
Never mind, I'm sure you'll find another home for it.
Wow! That was fast! So grotto/grot connects to gua by...uh, starting with
g-. Then we reverse! (An old trick of Franz's, hope he doesn't mind you
using it.) But wait: reverse what? Reversing gua would give aug; but you
want uag, don't you? So, okay, not "reverse" but "scramble the letters
around a bit". This gives us evac, vag, bag and ba. Ba? I can't find
an Indonesian ba meaning 'bag' in anything close to hand. Where did you
pick it up?
Post by Daud Deden
Bats tend to live in caves.
So that's why they're called murcielago!
But what happened to murky-licky? Double-overforming?
Wouldn't bats in the belfry be more apt in this case.
António Marques
2017-11-02 14:57:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by DKleinecke
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
Bats tend to live in caves.
So that's why they're called murcielago!
But what happened to murky-licky? Double-overforming?
Wouldn't bats in the belfry be more apt in this case.
I just can't get how the 2-3 of you can keep talking to this person.
DKleinecke
2017-11-02 17:43:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by António Marques
Post by DKleinecke
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
Bats tend to live in caves.
So that's why they're called murcielago!
But what happened to murky-licky? Double-overforming?
Wouldn't bats in the belfry be more apt in this case.
I just can't get how the 2-3 of you can keep talking to this person.
I'm hoping he will say something useful. Hope springs eternal etc.
but that post was intended as my last. Maybe I can resist the
temptation.
Daud Deden
2017-11-02 22:55:20 UTC
Permalink
Ross, Portug. Navig. Fernando Po's account described meeting Lusu women and getting the word IIRC.

Cave<reverse>evac is not indicating a trend, but rather a syllable permutation that incidentally resulted in letter order reversal.
Daud Deden
2017-11-02 23:18:41 UTC
Permalink
***@Grk: darkness
Daud Deden
2017-11-03 11:42:11 UTC
Permalink
***@Grk: darkness
I guess from (physiological) ***@Mbuti:broad leaf shingle/***@Latin/scute/scale/cataract, not specifically from cave or dome hut.

***@Spanish: black, ***@Latin: dark &
***@Greek: dark derive from ***@Mbuti: endomed, cf ***@Malay: darken.
*Muabuanuaguadtualrua ~ *menege(r/l)a which is also the root for ***@Malay: nation (from hut cf. Bu.ngalo) and ***@Sanskrit and many other words.
b***@ihug.co.nz
2017-11-02 23:51:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Daud Deden
Ross, Portug. Navig. Fernando Po's account described meeting Lusu women and getting the word IIRC.
Right. I figured it was him. Now all we need to know is where you
read this.
Post by Daud Deden
Cave<reverse>evac is not indicating a trend, but rather a syllable permutation that incidentally resulted in letter order reversal.
Ah. So you think "cave" has two syllables?
b***@ihug.co.nz
2017-11-02 23:51:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
Ross, Portug. Navig. Fernando Po's account described meeting Lusu women and getting the word IIRC.
Right. I figured it was him. Now all we need to know is where you
read this.
Post by Daud Deden
Cave<reverse>evac is not indicating a trend, but rather a syllable permutation that incidentally resulted in letter order reversal.
Ah. So you think "cave" has two syllables?
And by "not indicating a trend" you mean you promise not to do it again?
Daud Deden
2017-11-05 16:51:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
Ross, Portug. Navig. Fernando Po's account described meeting Lusu women and getting the word IIRC.
Right. I figured it was him. Now all we need to know is where you
read this.
Post by Daud Deden
Cave<reverse>evac is not indicating a trend, but rather a syllable permutation that incidentally resulted in letter order reversal.
Ah. So you think "cave" has two syllables?
1 cave/verb (cve=cua=gua)
2 cavern/noun
3 cavernous/adjective
4 excavate (ex-cava/quaffe/scoop/cup/qufa:coracle)
5 evacuate eva/cua/te

eva appears linked to vapor, which as smoke tend to rise
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
And by "not indicating a trend" you mean you promise not to do it again?
You must be having some difficulties in comprehending my messages, Ross. When I said it is not indicating a trend, I meant it is not indicating a trend. Your knee-jerk response seems to be a creation of your own with little regard to what I wrote.
DKleinecke
2017-11-05 19:26:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Daud Deden
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
Ross, Portug. Navig. Fernando Po's account described meeting Lusu women and getting the word IIRC.
Right. I figured it was him. Now all we need to know is where you
read this.
Post by Daud Deden
Cave<reverse>evac is not indicating a trend, but rather a syllable permutation that incidentally resulted in letter order reversal.
Ah. So you think "cave" has two syllables?
1 cave/verb (cve=cua=gua)
2 cavern/noun
3 cavernous/adjective
4 excavate (ex-cava/quaffe/scoop/cup/qufa:coracle)
5 evacuate eva/cua/te
eva appears linked to vapor, which as smoke tend to rise
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
And by "not indicating a trend" you mean you promise not to do it again?
You must be having some difficulties in comprehending my messages, Ross. When I said it is not indicating a trend, I meant it is not indicating a trend. Your knee-jerk response seems to be a creation of your own with little regard to what I wrote.
Ross is not the only one having difficulty in comprehending
your messages.

what is
ex-cava/quaffe/scoop/cup/qufa:coracle
supposed to demonstrate?

Why, after listing 4 related words (cave etc.) do you bring
in "evacuate" which is "e-vacu-ate" and unrelated to
"ex-cav-ate"? There is nothing paleolithic about details of
Late Latin derivations.
Daud Deden
2017-11-06 22:51:03 UTC
Permalink
DK: cavus, cavV, cua, gua
DKleinecke
2017-11-06 23:28:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Daud Deden
DK: cavus, cavV, cua, gua
Makes no sense without your codebook.
Daud Deden
2017-11-07 22:32:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by DKleinecke
Post by Daud Deden
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
Ross, Portug. Navig. Fernando Po's account described meeting Lusu women and getting the word IIRC.
Right. I figured it was him. Now all we need to know is where you
read this.
Post by Daud Deden
Cave<reverse>evac is not indicating a trend, but rather a syllable permutation that incidentally resulted in letter order reversal.
Ah. So you think "cave" has two syllables?
1 cave/verb (cve=cua=gua)
2 cavern/noun
3 cavernous/adjective
4 excavate (ex-cava/quaffe/scoop/cup/qufa:coracle)
5 evacuate eva/cua/te
eva appears linked to vapor, which as smoke tend to rise
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
And by "not indicating a trend" you mean you promise not to do it again?
You must be having some difficulties in comprehending my messages, Ross. When I said it is not indicating a trend, I meant it is not indicating a trend. Your knee-jerk response seems to be a creation of your own with little regard to what I wrote.
Ross is not the only one having difficulty in comprehending
your messages.
what is
ex-cava/quaffe/scoop/cup/qufa:coracle
supposed to demonstrate?
Why, after listing 4 related words (cave etc.) do you bring
in "evacuate" which is "e-vacu-ate" and unrelated to
"ex-cav-ate"? There is nothing paleolithic about details of
Late Latin derivations.
DK, eva-CUA-te, ex-CaVA-te, GUA, QUaFe, sCUP/scoop, CUP, QUFa all of these refer in some way to 'scooped out', concave form, derived from ancestral inverted domicile/dome shield, ( ~ *xyuambua ~ sieve)
DKleinecke
2017-11-08 00:15:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Daud Deden
Post by DKleinecke
Post by Daud Deden
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
Ross, Portug. Navig. Fernando Po's account described meeting Lusu women and getting the word IIRC.
Right. I figured it was him. Now all we need to know is where you
read this.
Post by Daud Deden
Cave<reverse>evac is not indicating a trend, but rather a syllable permutation that incidentally resulted in letter order reversal.
Ah. So you think "cave" has two syllables?
1 cave/verb (cve=cua=gua)
2 cavern/noun
3 cavernous/adjective
4 excavate (ex-cava/quaffe/scoop/cup/qufa:coracle)
5 evacuate eva/cua/te
eva appears linked to vapor, which as smoke tend to rise
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
And by "not indicating a trend" you mean you promise not to do it again?
You must be having some difficulties in comprehending my messages, Ross. When I said it is not indicating a trend, I meant it is not indicating a trend. Your knee-jerk response seems to be a creation of your own with little regard to what I wrote.
Ross is not the only one having difficulty in comprehending
your messages.
what is
ex-cava/quaffe/scoop/cup/qufa:coracle
supposed to demonstrate?
Why, after listing 4 related words (cave etc.) do you bring
in "evacuate" which is "e-vacu-ate" and unrelated to
"ex-cav-ate"? There is nothing paleolithic about details of
Late Latin derivations.
DK, eva-CUA-te, ex-CaVA-te, GUA, QUaFe, sCUP/scoop, CUP, QUFa all of these refer in some way to 'scooped out', concave form, derived from ancestral inverted domicile/dome shield, ( ~ *xyuambua ~ sieve)
But, among other things, we know it is e-vacu-ate not eva-cua-ate
b***@ihug.co.nz
2017-11-05 20:00:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Daud Deden
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
Ross, Portug. Navig. Fernando Po's account described meeting Lusu women and getting the word IIRC.
Right. I figured it was him. Now all we need to know is where you
read this.
Post by Daud Deden
Cave<reverse>evac is not indicating a trend, but rather a syllable permutation that incidentally resulted in letter order reversal.
Ah. So you think "cave" has two syllables?
Well, do you or not? The word-strings are not an answer. If you think
"cave" has two syllables, you are obviously not listening (contrary to
your usual boasts). If you don't, then what can you mean by "syllable
permutation"? Just shuffling letters around?
Post by Daud Deden
1 cave/verb (cve=cua=gua)
2 cavern/noun
3 cavernous/adjective
4 excavate (ex-cava/quaffe/scoop/cup/qufa:coracle)
5 evacuate eva/cua/te
eva appears linked to vapor, which as smoke tend to rise
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
And by "not indicating a trend" you mean you promise not to do it again?
You must be having some difficulties in comprehending my messages, Ross.
And not just me. It's good that you have at last realized this.

When I said it is not indicating a trend, I meant it is not indicating a trend.

This is exactly as useful as "Papuan means Papuan".

Your knee-jerk response seems to be a creation of your own with little regard to what I wrote.

Well, it was what first came to mind. If that's not what you meant, you'll
need to do a better job of explaining.
Daud Deden
2017-11-07 22:37:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
Ross, Portug. Navig. Fernando Po's account described meeting Lusu women and getting the word IIRC.
Right. I figured it was him. Now all we need to know is where you
read this.
Post by Daud Deden
Cave<reverse>evac is not indicating a trend, but rather a syllable permutation that incidentally resulted in letter order reversal.
Ah. So you think "cave" has two syllables?
Well, do you or not?
***@Modern Amer. English = 1 syllable pronounced.

The word-strings are not an answer. If you think
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
"cave" has two syllables, you are obviously not listening (contrary to
your usual boasts).
Thank you.

If you don't, then what can you mean by "syllable
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
permutation"? Just shuffling letters around?
As in Hebrew & Arabic triliteral root shuffling to form related words.
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
1 cave/verb (cve=cua=gua)
2 cavern/noun
3 cavernous/adjective
4 excavate (ex-cava/quaffe/scoop/cup/qufa:coracle)
5 evacuate eva/cua/te
eva appears linked to vapor, which as smoke tend to rise
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
And by "not indicating a trend" you mean you promise not to do it again?
You must be having some difficulties in comprehending my messages, Ross.
And not just me. It's good that you have at last realized this.
I expected it, as I've said before. How many Paleo-etymologists are there here?
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
When I said it is not indicating a trend, I meant it is not indicating a trend.
This is exactly as useful as "Papuan means Papuan".
Your knee-jerk response seems to be a creation of your own with little regard to what I wrote.
Well, it was what first came to mind. If that's not what you meant, you'll
need to do a better job of explaining.
Listen. There are patterns.
b***@ihug.co.nz
2017-11-07 22:43:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
Ross, Portug. Navig. Fernando Po's account described meeting Lusu women and getting the word IIRC.
Right. I figured it was him. Now all we need to know is where you
read this.
Post by Daud Deden
Cave<reverse>evac is not indicating a trend, but rather a syllable permutation that incidentally resulted in letter order reversal.
Ah. So you think "cave" has two syllables?
Well, do you or not?
The word-strings are not an answer. If you think
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
"cave" has two syllables, you are obviously not listening (contrary to
your usual boasts).
Thank you.
If you don't, then what can you mean by "syllable
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
permutation"? Just shuffling letters around?
As in Hebrew & Arabic triliteral root shuffling to form related words.
I'll take that as a "yes".
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
1 cave/verb (cve=cua=gua)
2 cavern/noun
3 cavernous/adjective
4 excavate (ex-cava/quaffe/scoop/cup/qufa:coracle)
5 evacuate eva/cua/te
eva appears linked to vapor, which as smoke tend to rise
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
And by "not indicating a trend" you mean you promise not to do it again?
You must be having some difficulties in comprehending my messages, Ross.
And not just me. It's good that you have at last realized this.
I expected it, as I've said before. How many Paleo-etymologists are there here?
How many are there anywhere?
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
When I said it is not indicating a trend, I meant it is not indicating a trend.
This is exactly as useful as "Papuan means Papuan".
Your knee-jerk response seems to be a creation of your own with little regard to what I wrote.
Well, it was what first came to mind. If that's not what you meant, you'll
need to do a better job of explaining.
Listen. There are patterns.
That is not an explanation of what you meant by "not indicating a trend".
Daud Deden
2017-11-07 22:52:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
Ross, Portug. Navig. Fernando Po's account described meeting Lusu women and getting the word IIRC.
Right. I figured it was him. Now all we need to know is where you
read this.
Post by Daud Deden
Cave<reverse>evac is not indicating a trend, but rather a syllable permutation that incidentally resulted in letter order reversal.
Ah. So you think "cave" has two syllables?
Well, do you or not?
The word-strings are not an answer. If you think
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
"cave" has two syllables, you are obviously not listening (contrary to
your usual boasts).
Thank you.
If you don't, then what can you mean by "syllable
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
permutation"? Just shuffling letters around?
As in Hebrew & Arabic triliteral root shuffling to form related words.
I'll take that as a "yes".
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
1 cave/verb (cve=cua=gua)
2 cavern/noun
3 cavernous/adjective
4 excavate (ex-cava/quaffe/scoop/cup/qufa:coracle)
5 evacuate eva/cua/te
eva appears linked to vapor, which as smoke tend to rise
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
And by "not indicating a trend" you mean you promise not to do it again?
You must be having some difficulties in comprehending my messages, Ross.
And not just me. It's good that you have at last realized this.
I expected it, as I've said before. How many Paleo-etymologists are there here?
How many are there anywhere?
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
When I said it is not indicating a trend, I meant it is not indicating a trend.
This is exactly as useful as "Papuan means Papuan".
Your knee-jerk response seems to be a creation of your own with little regard to what I wrote.
Well, it was what first came to mind. If that's not what you meant, you'll
need to do a better job of explaining.
Listen. There are patterns.
That is not an explanation of what you meant by "not indicating a trend".
There are patterns, generally indicated by word strings which link sounds and meanings in some way.

I noted that <reverse> did not necessarily mean it was deliberate (it seldom is, contra Franz & Carlos L.'s opinions). I noted that syllable permutation
may occur and may be significant, but later dropped it in this case because as I noted, I'd misread it. "not indicating a trend" resulted from this, IIRC.
Franz Gnaedinger
2017-11-08 08:02:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Daud Deden
There are patterns, generally indicated by word strings which link sounds and meanings in some way.
I noted that <reverse> did not necessarily mean it was deliberate (it seldom is, contra Franz & Carlos L.'s opinions). I noted that syllable permutation
may occur and may be significant, but later dropped it in this case because as I noted, I'd misread it. "not indicating a trend" resulted from this, IIRC.
If, as you claim, David and diode are akin, then also Daud and dead. You have
no method of deciding when similar sounds are semantically relevant and when
they are not. Early on I asked you whether you get your wisdom from above?
You said you'll answer that question later. Now the time has come. What have
David and a semiconductor in common? is that a divine inspiration?
Daud Deden
2017-11-08 13:42:59 UTC
Permalink
Franz: "If, as you claim, David and diode are akin, then also Daud and dead".

Possibly, since dead is away, and hodos is a way/route. But then, vid is a way of seeing too. Needs further analysis.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-11-03 03:09:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
Ross, Portug. Navig. Fernando Po's account described meeting Lusu women and getting the word IIRC.
Right. I figured it was him. Now all we need to know is where you
read this.
Post by Daud Deden
Cave<reverse>evac is not indicating a trend, but rather a syllable permutation that incidentally resulted in letter order reversal.
Ah. So you think "cave" has two syllables?
He didn't reverse the syllables, but the letters (the phonemes) -- a task that
we know is difficult for people who haven't been taught an _alphabetic_ script.
Daud Deden
2017-11-02 23:15:37 UTC
Permalink
Murky/milky/melug/lick.uid cf. Stalactites, galactic

ba might be dialect, it isn't Malay, where bag is bungkus.
b***@ihug.co.nz
2017-11-02 23:36:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Daud Deden
Murky/milky/melug/lick.uid cf. Stalactites, galactic
ba might be dialect, it isn't Malay, where bag is bungkus.
Yah, I guess it might be. And there might be a "Lusu" language
somewhere where the word for 'woman' is "guinea"....We'll never know.

Any student would get a failing grade for being as sloppy as you are
with data -- and providing no references.
Daud Deden
2017-11-03 11:54:47 UTC
Permalink
..We'll never know.
-
Ross, I'll find it in a dusty cabinet in the back of my mind, got to let it float up.
-
Any student would get a failing grade for being as sloppy as you are
with data -- and providing no references.
-
Neo-etymologistic whitewash, fanboy approved but irrelevant to Paleo-etymologic research. References available upon request, of course most are anonymous since paleo-people did not have names & permanent addresses & dictionaries & computers. ;)
b***@ihug.co.nz
2017-11-03 21:00:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
..We'll never know.
-
Ross, I'll find it in a dusty cabinet in the back of my mind, got to let it float up.
-
Any student would get a failing grade for being as sloppy as you are
with data -- and providing no references.
-
Neo-etymologistic whitewash, fanboy approved but irrelevant to Paleo-etymologic research.
Clearly.
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
References available upon request,
My request for a reference on "Lusu/guinea" is still unanswered. You did
manage to remember F.de Pó's name, but I doubt it was a personal
communication from the old slaver. You must have read it somewhere.

of course most are anonymous since paleo-people did not have names & permanent addresses & dictionaries & computers. ;)

Of course. I'm not crazy enough to ask for a reference for *bulabulahulahula
etc., any more than I would for Franz's monosyllables.
Daud Deden
2017-11-04 18:20:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
..We'll never know.
-
Ross, I'll find it in a dusty cabinet in the back of my mind, got to let it float up.
-
Any student would get a failing grade for being as sloppy as you are
with data -- and providing no references.
-
Neo-etymologistic whitewash, fanboy approved but irrelevant to Paleo-etymologic research.
Clearly.
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
References available upon request,
My request for a reference on "Lusu/guinea" is still unanswered.
No, Ross, the answer is:

"Ross, I'll find it in a dusty cabinet in the back of my mind, got to let it float up."

Patience is a virtue in Paleo-etymology.


You did
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
manage to remember F.de Pó's name, but I doubt it was a personal
communication from the old slaver. You must have read it somewhere.
Please cite any reference to Po being a slaver rather than the King's Navigator.

-----------------------------------------------
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
of course most are anonymous since paleo-people did not have names & permanent addresses & dictionaries & computers. ;)
Of course. I'm not crazy enough to ask for a reference for *bulabulahulahula
etc., any more than I would for Franz's monosyllables.
Good on you mate! You're learning. Names are not paleo-etymological, sounds are.
b***@ihug.co.nz
2017-11-05 06:52:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Daud Deden
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
..We'll never know.
-
Ross, I'll find it in a dusty cabinet in the back of my mind, got to let it float up.
-
Any student would get a failing grade for being as sloppy as you are
with data -- and providing no references.
-
Neo-etymologistic whitewash, fanboy approved but irrelevant to Paleo-etymologic research.
Clearly.
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
References available upon request,
My request for a reference on "Lusu/guinea" is still unanswered.
"Ross, I'll find it in a dusty cabinet in the back of my mind, got to let it float up."
Patience is a virtue in Paleo-etymology.
As is an understanding of what "answer" and "on request" mean.
Post by Daud Deden
You did
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
manage to remember F.de Pó's name, but I doubt it was a personal
communication from the old slaver. You must have read it somewhere.
Please cite any reference to Po being a slaver rather than the King's Navigator.
-----------------------------------------------
John William Blake, Europeans in West Africa 1540-1560
(The Google Books copy does not seem to have any page numbers,
but if you search for "Fernand de les Vaux" you should find the
most interesting passage.)
Post by Daud Deden
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
of course most are anonymous since paleo-people did not have names & permanent addresses & dictionaries & computers. ;)
Of course. I'm not crazy enough to ask for a reference for *bulabulahulahula
etc., any more than I would for Franz's monosyllables.
Good on you mate! You're learning.
No, that's not learning. That's just common sense.

Names are not paleo-etymological, sounds are.

...whatever that may mean.
Daud Deden
2017-11-05 17:02:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
..We'll never know.
-
Ross, I'll find it in a dusty cabinet in the back of my mind, got to let it float up.
-
Any student would get a failing grade for being as sloppy as you are
with data -- and providing no references.
-
Neo-etymologistic whitewash, fanboy approved but irrelevant to Paleo-etymologic research.
Clearly.
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
References available upon request,
My request for a reference on "Lusu/guinea" is still unanswered.
"Ross, I'll find it in a dusty cabinet in the back of my mind, got to let it float up."
Patience is a virtue in Paleo-etymology.
As is an understanding of what "answer" and "on request" mean.
Of course. If you want instant linguistic answers, ask Neo-etymologists easy questions, they'll google their dictionaries and have their answers in seconds, efficiently and very tidy.

Paleo-etymologists have a different timetable and entirely different system, which you seem to be unable to decipher even with my abundant assistance.
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
You did
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
manage to remember F.de Pó's name, but I doubt it was a personal
communication from the old slaver. You must have read it somewhere.
Please cite any reference to Po being a slaver rather than the King's Navigator.
-----------------------------------------------
John William Blake, Europeans in West Africa 1540-1560
(The Google Books copy does not seem to have any page numbers,
but if you search for "Fernand de les Vaux" you should find the
most interesting passage.)
Post by Daud Deden
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
of course most are anonymous since paleo-people did not have names & permanent addresses & dictionaries & computers. ;)
Of course. I'm not crazy enough to ask for a reference for *bulabulahulahula
etc., any more than I would for Franz's monosyllables.
Good on you mate! You're learning.
No, that's not learning. That's just common sense.
Common sense comes from learning.
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Names are not paleo-etymological, sounds are.
...whatever that may mean.
Names are labels, sounds are not.
b***@ihug.co.nz
2017-11-05 20:04:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Daud Deden
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
..We'll never know.
-
Ross, I'll find it in a dusty cabinet in the back of my mind, got to let it float up.
-
Any student would get a failing grade for being as sloppy as you are
with data -- and providing no references.
-
Neo-etymologistic whitewash, fanboy approved but irrelevant to Paleo-etymologic research.
Clearly.
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
References available upon request,
My request for a reference on "Lusu/guinea" is still unanswered.
"Ross, I'll find it in a dusty cabinet in the back of my mind, got to let it float up."
Patience is a virtue in Paleo-etymology.
As is an understanding of what "answer" and "on request" mean.
Of course. If you want instant linguistic answers, ask Neo-etymologists easy questions, they'll google their dictionaries and have their answers in seconds, efficiently and very tidy.
Actually most people who do research on anything will keep better notes or
have better memories than you.
But I'm willing to wait. Just don't try to make your delays into some kind of
paleo-virtue.
Post by Daud Deden
Paleo-etymologists have a different timetable and entirely different system, which you seem to be unable to decipher even with my abundant assistance.
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
You did
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
manage to remember F.de Pó's name, but I doubt it was a personal
communication from the old slaver. You must have read it somewhere.
Please cite any reference to Po being a slaver rather than the King's Navigator.
-----------------------------------------------
John William Blake, Europeans in West Africa 1540-1560
(The Google Books copy does not seem to have any page numbers,
but if you search for "Fernand de les Vaux" you should find the
most interesting passage.)
Post by Daud Deden
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
of course most are anonymous since paleo-people did not have names & permanent addresses & dictionaries & computers. ;)
Of course. I'm not crazy enough to ask for a reference for *bulabulahulahula
etc., any more than I would for Franz's monosyllables.
Good on you mate! You're learning.
No, that's not learning. That's just common sense.
Common sense comes from learning.
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Names are not paleo-etymological, sounds are.
...whatever that may mean.
Names are labels, sounds are not.
No clearer.
Daud Deden
2017-11-07 22:40:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
..We'll never know.
-
Ross, I'll find it in a dusty cabinet in the back of my mind, got to let it float up.
-
Any student would get a failing grade for being as sloppy as you are
with data -- and providing no references.
-
Neo-etymologistic whitewash, fanboy approved but irrelevant to Paleo-etymologic research.
Clearly.
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
References available upon request,
My request for a reference on "Lusu/guinea" is still unanswered.
"Ross, I'll find it in a dusty cabinet in the back of my mind, got to let it float up."
Patience is a virtue in Paleo-etymology.
As is an understanding of what "answer" and "on request" mean.
Of course. If you want instant linguistic answers, ask Neo-etymologists easy questions, they'll google their dictionaries and have their answers in seconds, efficiently and very tidy.
Actually most people who do research on anything will keep better notes or
have better memories than you.
Thank you. A compliment even better than your best. Go pick up your Nobel. I've got Paleo-etymological work to do.
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
But I'm willing to wait. Just don't try to make your delays into some kind of
paleo-virtue.
Post by Daud Deden
Paleo-etymologists have a different timetable and entirely different system, which you seem to be unable to decipher even with my abundant assistance.
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
You did
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
manage to remember F.de Pó's name, but I doubt it was a personal
communication from the old slaver. You must have read it somewhere.
Please cite any reference to Po being a slaver rather than the King's Navigator.
-----------------------------------------------
John William Blake, Europeans in West Africa 1540-1560
(The Google Books copy does not seem to have any page numbers,
but if you search for "Fernand de les Vaux" you should find the
most interesting passage.)
Post by Daud Deden
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
of course most are anonymous since paleo-people did not have names & permanent addresses & dictionaries & computers. ;)
Of course. I'm not crazy enough to ask for a reference for *bulabulahulahula
etc., any more than I would for Franz's monosyllables.
Good on you mate! You're learning.
No, that's not learning. That's just common sense.
Common sense comes from learning.
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Names are not paleo-etymological, sounds are.
...whatever that may mean.
Names are labels, sounds are not.
No clearer.
Can't help you with the obvious, Ross.
Franz Gnaedinger
2017-11-06 07:21:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Of course. I'm not crazy enough to ask for a reference for *bulabulahulahula
etc., any more than I would for Franz's monosyllables.
Mallory and Adams propose that PIE as of 4000 BC had between 30,000 and
50,000 lexical units. I mined a good 400 Magdalenian words (using my four
laws of Magdalenian). They allow in principle 160,000 compounds of two words,
64,000,000 compounds of three words, and 25,600,000,000 compounds of four
words like for example AD TOR OC CO Mycenaean atoroqo Greek anthropos 'human
being' - toward AD bull in motion TOR right eye OC attentive mind CO, facing
the bull with open eyes and focused mind, taking him by the horns, coping with
fate ... Greek anthropos would originally have been a formula for the human
condition, while anthropology studies how we cope with fate (this concise
definition could replace the long descriptive ones I find in dictionaries).

Economy is on the side of Magdalenian, surpassed only by genetics that
encodes all forms of life with 'words' of three 'letters' and an alphabet
of only four chemical 'letters' (adenin and thymin, guanin and cytosin).
I consider the human word language an extended phenotype (a term coind by
Richard Dawkins) and note with pleasure the above parallel between genetics
and Magdalenian. Far from conclusive evidence, but still gives me a feeling
of being on the right way.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-11-06 12:26:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Franz Gnaedinger
Mallory and Adams
We used to complain that Franz used only one source. His practice now proves to be infinitely(?)
better than using no sources at all.
Post by Franz Gnaedinger
propose that PIE as of 4000 BC had between 30,000 and
50,000 lexical units.
They say that because that's the order of magnitude of the vocabulary of _every_ human language
(except for those languages that are rife with borrowings and recent coinages reflecting
complications in the cultures that use them).
Franz Gnaedinger
2017-11-07 07:48:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
We used to complain that Franz used only one source. His practice now proves to be infinitely(?)
better than using no sources at all.
I use a lot of sources, but Mallory and Adams is the most practical one.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
They say that because that's the order of magnitude of the vocabulary of _every_ human language
(except for those languages that are rife with borrowings and recent coinages reflecting
complications in the cultures that use them).
The vocabular increases with the number of things we create and use and
possess. Information technology alone created 20,000 new English words and
terms. They had much less things in the time of Lascaux than in the the one
of Proto-Indo-European, ergo also less words.
Franz Gnaedinger
2017-11-07 08:08:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Franz Gnaedinger
Post by Peter T. Daniels
We used to complain that Franz used only one source. His practice now proves to be infinitely(?)
better than using no sources at all.
I use a lot of sources, but Mallory and Adams is the most practical one.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
They say that because that's the order of magnitude of the vocabulary of _every_ human language
(except for those languages that are rife with borrowings and recent coinages reflecting
complications in the cultures that use them).
The vocabular increases with the number of things we create and use and
possess. Information technology alone created 20,000 new English words and
terms. They had much less things in the time of Lascaux than in the the one
of Proto-Indo-European, ergo also less words.
PS You dropped one of your brf cmmnts in my Magdalenian thread I don't
ndrstnd, saying other kooks offer test cases. What test case did Allgod offer?
what test case does Diode present?
Peter T. Daniels
2017-11-07 13:22:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Franz Gnaedinger
Post by Franz Gnaedinger
Post by Peter T. Daniels
We used to complain that Franz used only one source. His practice now proves to be infinitely(?)
better than using no sources at all.
I use a lot of sources, but Mallory and Adams is the most practical one.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
They say that because that's the order of magnitude of the vocabulary of _every_ human language
(except for those languages that are rife with borrowings and recent coinages reflecting
complications in the cultures that use them).
The vocabular increases with the number of things we create and use and
possess. Information technology alone created 20,000 new English words and
terms. They had much less things in the time of Lascaux than in the the one
of Proto-Indo-European, ergo also less words.
PS You dropped one of your brf cmmnts in my Magdalenian thread I don't
If you want a "thread" to be your personal property, then don't post it in a
newsgroup, but put it on your web page.
Post by Franz Gnaedinger
ndrstnd, saying other kooks offer test cases. What test case did Allgod offer?
what test case does Diode present?
I don't think I said that; my point was that you demand that others provide
"test cases" like yours but whenever someone "tests" one of your "cases" and
finds it wanting, you ignore their finding (and continue to present the same
"test case" over and over and over insisting that it hasn't been "tested").
Franz Gnaedinger
2017-11-08 07:56:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
I don't think I said that; my point was that you demand that others provide
"test cases" like yours but whenever someone "tests" one of your "cases" and
finds it wanting, you ignore their finding (and continue to present the same
"test case" over and over and over insisting that it hasn't been "tested").
Piling meta-statement on meta-statement on meta-statement instead of leading
a direct discussion on the topic level. You claim that test cases of mine
have been found wanting or even disproved, but you can't quote such a disprove,
nor repeat it in your own words. Science is about repeatability. If you guys
had a valid argument against a claim of mine, in a good formulation, you would
store it somewhere on one of your computers, and quote it again and again.
But you don't have such an argument on your side, you only ever claim that
there is such an argument, which, in itself, is an argument on the meta-level.
The never ending meta-discussions in sci.lang are most boring. On the other
hand they tell me that you lack topic arguments and thus confirm me. Thanks.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-11-08 12:29:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Franz Gnaedinger
Post by Peter T. Daniels
I don't think I said that; my point was that you demand that others provide
"test cases" like yours but whenever someone "tests" one of your "cases" and
finds it wanting, you ignore their finding (and continue to present the same
"test case" over and over and over insisting that it hasn't been "tested").
Piling meta-statement on meta-statement on meta-statement instead of leading
a direct discussion on the topic level. You claim that test cases of mine
have been found wanting or even disproved, but you can't quote such a disprove,
disproof

I think that proves that you don't read the replies to your messages.
Post by Franz Gnaedinger
nor repeat it in your own words.
You write about things I have no interest or knowledge in.

Science is about repeatability. If you guys
Post by Franz Gnaedinger
had a valid argument against a claim of mine, in a good formulation, you would
store it somewhere on one of your computers, and quote it again and again.
No, they would not. Only you do that.
Post by Franz Gnaedinger
But you don't have such an argument on your side, you only ever claim that
there is such an argument, which, in itself, is an argument on the meta-level.
The never ending meta-discussions in sci.lang are most boring. On the other
hand they tell me that you lack topic arguments and thus confirm me. Thanks.
You simply prove that you don't read the replies to your messages.
Franz Gnaedinger
2017-11-09 08:01:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
You simply prove that you don't read the replies to your messages.
I read them, but simply score a point when I see another meta-argument
instead of a topic one.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-11-09 12:19:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Franz Gnaedinger
Post by Peter T. Daniels
You simply prove that you don't read the replies to your messages.
I read them, but simply score a point when I see another meta-argument
instead of a topic one.
"Topic" arguments are meaningless without the "meta" background. If you cannot
conform to the methods of science, you cannot be taken seriously by scientists.
Franz Gnaedinger
2017-11-10 07:18:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
"Topic" arguments are meaningless without the "meta" background. If you cannot
conform to the methods of science, you cannot be taken seriously by scientists.
You claim that there are messages that finish off with Magdalenian, but you
don't quote them, neither do you render those arguments in your own words.
Well, I discovered the world formula. Carved it on a rock in the Swiss Alps.
Go find it ... Quoting my alleged formula would be a topic message, just making
a claim is a meta-message, worthless in a scientific discussion, where we have
to play with open cards.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-11-10 13:25:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Franz Gnaedinger
Post by Peter T. Daniels
"Topic" arguments are meaningless without the "meta" background. If you cannot
conform to the methods of science, you cannot be taken seriously by scientists.
You claim that there are messages that finish off with Magdalenian,
I don't know what that means, so I know I claimed no such thing.
Post by Franz Gnaedinger
but you
don't quote them, neither do you render those arguments in your own words.
Well, I discovered the world formula. Carved it on a rock in the Swiss Alps.
Go find it ... Quoting my alleged formula would be a topic message, just making
a claim is a meta-message, worthless in a scientific discussion, where we have
to play with open cards.
You did not discover a "world formula," whatever that is, and you did not carve
it on a rock in the Swiss Alps.

Is that a "meta message">
Franz Gnaedinger
2017-11-11 08:10:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
I don't know what that means, so I know I claimed no such thing.
Your meta-discussions are based on a syllogism: I am right - his opinion
differs from mine - ergo he is wrong ... Sorry, but I take no stocks
in your brand of ergonomics.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-11-11 13:27:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Franz Gnaedinger
Post by Peter T. Daniels
I don't know what that means, so I know I claimed no such thing.
"That" is the word salad "You claim that there are messages that finish off with Magdalenian,"
Post by Franz Gnaedinger
Your meta-discussions are based on a syllogism: I am right - his opinion
differs from mine - ergo he is wrong ... Sorry, but I take no stocks
in your brand of ergonomics.
That is not a syllogism. (It's also untrue.)
Franz Gnaedinger
2017-11-13 08:09:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
"That" is the word salad "You claim that there are messages that finish off with Magdalenian,"
So you don't believe that there are messages in the Google archive which
disprove at least some of my test cases? YG claimed just that, so I asked
him to quote them, but he told me that I can search for them myself.
Hereupon I made the claim that I carved the world formula on a rock in
the Swiss Alps, he may go find it ... Your speciality, PTD, are half
arguments insinuating the other half, and when I verbalizes the silent half
you can always tell me wrong or a liar. So there is no getting around my
test cases: go for my triple test case regarding the name of Zeus, the
Indo-European homeland, and words for the horse. Until now you carefully
avoided my test cases, knowing that you can't cope with me on the topic
level of a discussion, and I guess you will go on doing that, escaping
to ever higher meta-levels, trying to entangle me in never ending
bo-o-oring meta-discussions. As you do just now.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-11-13 12:15:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Franz Gnaedinger
Post by Peter T. Daniels
"That" is the word salad "You claim that there are messages that finish off with Magdalenian,"
So you don't believe that there are messages in the Google archive which
disprove at least some of my test cases?
Of course there are. How was I supposed to get that from "You claim that there are messages
that finish off with Magdalenian"?
Franz Gnaedinger
2017-11-14 10:15:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Of course there are. How was I supposed to get that from "You claim that there are messages
that finish off with Magdalenian"?
Now again there are messages in the archive that prove me wrong. So quote
them, or repeat the arguments in your own words.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-11-14 13:56:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Franz Gnaedinger
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Of course there are. How was I supposed to get that from "You claim that there are messages
that finish off with Magdalenian"?
Now again there are messages in the archive that prove me wrong. So quote
them, or repeat the arguments in your own words.
Why didn't you read them the first seven thousand times they were posted?
Franz Gnaedinger
2017-11-15 07:52:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Why didn't you read them the first seven thousand times they were posted?
I read all of them, and answered all objections on the scientific level.
You wish to get rid of Magdalenian since the beginning of my Paleo-linguistic
experiment in early 2005. You download big files from the Web. You claim
that there are seven thousand messages disproving Magdalenian. But you can't
quote a single one; you kept none of them. Now this obliges you to go on
climbing to ever higher meta-levels and blow fog down into my valley below
by making claims you can't cover with quotes.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-11-15 14:52:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Franz Gnaedinger
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Why didn't you read them the first seven thousand times they were posted?
I read all of them, and answered all objections on the scientific level.
If you had in fact done so, then the subsequent 6,999 times the same objections were raised
would have been unnecessary and would not have been done.
Post by Franz Gnaedinger
You wish to get rid of Magdalenian since the beginning of my Paleo-linguistic
experiment in early 2005. You download big files from the Web. You claim
that there are seven thousand messages disproving Magdalenian. But you can't
quote a single one; you kept none of them.
You don't understand how computers work. Not one of the messages in any of the five newsgroups I
look at resides on my hard drive. They are not saved there; I don't need to delete them. They
are simply in a Google server somewhere.
Franz Gnaedinger
2017-11-16 07:26:00 UTC
Permalink
7,000 messages which disprove Magdalenian but you can't quote a single one.
How sadfunny is that?
Peter T. Daniels
2017-11-16 12:23:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Franz Gnaedinger
7,000 messages which disprove Magdalenian but you can't quote a single one.
How sadfunny is that?
I do not have the slightest interest in "Magdalenian," because it has nothing to
do with human language or human history. What is "sadfunny" is that you never
paid attention to a single one of them.
Franz Gnaedinger
2017-11-17 08:07:17 UTC
Permalink
Neither seven nor seventy nor seven hundred but a staggering seven thousand
messages allegedly disprove Magdalenian. Why doesn't he quote even a single
one of them?

Daud Deden
2017-11-07 22:44:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Franz Gnaedinger
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Of course. I'm not crazy enough to ask for a reference for *bulabulahulahula
etc., any more than I would for Franz's monosyllables.
Mallory and Adams propose that PIE as of 4000 BC had between 30,000 and
50,000 lexical units. I mined a good 400 Magdalenian words (using my four
laws of Magdalenian). They allow in principle 160,000 compounds of two words,
64,000,000 compounds of three words, and 25,600,000,000 compounds of four
words like for example AD TOR OC CO Mycenaean atoroqo Greek anthropos 'human
being' - toward AD bull in motion TOR right eye OC attentive mind CO, facing
the bull with open eyes and focused mind, taking him by the horns, coping with
fate ... Greek anthropos would originally have been a formula for the human
condition, while anthropology studies how we cope with fate (this concise
definition could replace the long descriptive ones I find in dictionaries).
Economy is on the side of Magdalenian, surpassed only by genetics that
encodes all forms of life with 'words' of three 'letters' and an alphabet
of only four chemical 'letters' (adenin and thymin, guanin and cytosin).
I consider the human word language an extended phenotype (a term coind by
Richard Dawkins) and note with pleasure the above parallel between genetics
and Magdalenian. Far from conclusive evidence, but still gives me a feeling
of being on the right way.
Any compound can be fractured into components.
compound/co-boundary/sym-metry/***@Malay:camp-hamlet/***@Malay:pocket(fu)l/***@Aztec:socket of firedrill: tletl
Franz Gnaedinger
2017-11-03 07:50:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Wow! That was fast! So grotto/grot connects to gua by...uh, starting with
g-. Then we reverse! (An old trick of Franz's, hope he doesn't mind you
using it.)
Not my trick, anticipated by Richard Fester, then accounting for my first law
of Magdalenian: inverse forms have related meanings. I derive woman from GYN
Greek gynae, inverse NYG for night and Nyx, taboo name of Despoina 'mistress',
alter ego of Demeter. Nyx was a poterful goddess feared even by Zeus. The
Elaia side or disc of the Phaistos Disc tells how to evoke her and get her
oracle. Cave in the Magdalenian perspective derives from KAL for cave,
Underworld, inverse LAK naming a lake, CA LAK was the heavenly lake or river,
later overformed by Galaxy 'Milky Way'. Woman and cave have no common origin
in Magdalenian, although there is a mythological connection, the Divine Hind
or Hind Woman from Altamira calling life into existence, also moon bulls,
thus creating time, periods of 30 29 30 29 30 29 30 29 30 29 30 ... days or
nights for 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ... lunations or synodic months.
Franz Gnaedinger
2017-11-04 08:54:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Franz Gnaedinger
Not my trick, anticipated by Richard Fester, then accounting for my first law
of Magdalenian: inverse forms have related meanings. I derive woman from GYN
Greek gynae, inverse NYG for night and Nyx, taboo name of Despoina 'mistress',
alter ego of Demeter. Nyx was a poterful goddess feared even by Zeus. The
Elaia side or disc of the Phaistos Disc tells how to evoke her and get her
oracle. Cave in the Magdalenian perspective derives from KAL for cave,
Underworld, inverse LAK naming a lake, CA LAK was the heavenly lake or river,
later overformed by Galaxy 'Milky Way'. Woman and cave have no common origin
in Magdalenian, although there is a mythological connection, the Divine Hind
or Hind Woman from Altamira calling life into existence, also moon bulls,
thus creating time, periods of 30 29 30 29 30 29 30 29 30 29 30 ... days or
nights for 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ... lunations or synodic months.
Sorry for the sloppy formulations. GYN for woman would account for Greek
gynae 'woman', inverse NYG for nyx 'night' and Nyx, goddess of the night.
Her mother was Elaia, goddess of olives; or Demeter-Elaia, Demeter the
goddess of agriculture; or Black Demeter Melaina, personifying droughts
and famines, worshipped in Elaia's grove at Phigalia (Pausanias), implored
for mercy - Pan playing a sweet melody on his flute made her soften and
spare people from starving. Nyx was a powerful goddess, feared by all,
even by Zeus (who personified the day as the supreme sky god). Nyx was
a chthonic goddess and had been equated with Gaia. By the way, the first
pair of inverses I encountered was AC for an expanse of land with water
(village names like Rouffignac and Cognac in the Guyenne) and CA for sky
(Old Latin caelum) while the compound AC CA named the Indo-European earth
goddess akka (a stammered name according to Pokorny, a meaningful name in
my opinion), the Sanskrit mother akka, and Hebrew Hawwa 'mother of all life'
English Eve. The inverse compound CA AC may have named Gaia. Those names
invoked the Great Goddess of old , her body symbolizing the fertile earth,
her breasts and arms (combined in some violin idols from the Cyclades)
the surface of the earth where we live and are active (arms) and find our
nourishment (breasts nourishing babies), and her head the sky, her eyes
moon and sun.

Daud Deden is right in connecting milk and honey Latin mel that may also
account for mel-ody (story of Pan above). Elaia as goddess of olives (elaia
'olive') provided oil and was associated with a giant bee on the gold ring
from Mokhlos, Crete. Marija Gimbutas presents a

'Bull-horned bee goddess in the shape of a bee' rendered on a stylized
bull's head of bone. Bilcze Zlote, northwestern Ukraine. Late Cucuteni.
Fourth millennium BC.

in my opinion (a heir of) the Orion goddess, emanation of the Divine Hind
Woman in Magdalenian times who sent moon bulls from Aldebaran in Taurus
'Bull' on their heavenly mission. Fermented honey and water yielded mead,
bulls provided meat, and blood of sacrificed bulls may have been sprinkled
on the ground in rites of making the land fertile.

Sounds can well reveal connections, but phonetical similarities alone
are not enough, they can also lead astray. Etymology is no less demanding
than taxonomy in biology. The minimum requirement for participating in
a scientific forum on language is to consult etymologies, best in university
libraries, but there are also fine sources online.

PS I showed up in here because Ross, unwisely, rubbed his oil lamp ...
Daud Deden
2017-11-04 18:29:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Franz Gnaedinger
Post by Franz Gnaedinger
Not my trick, anticipated by Richard Fester, then accounting for my first law
of Magdalenian: inverse forms have related meanings. I derive woman from GYN
Greek gynae, inverse NYG for night and Nyx, taboo name of Despoina 'mistress',
alter ego of Demeter. Nyx was a poterful goddess feared even by Zeus. The
Elaia side or disc of the Phaistos Disc tells how to evoke her and get her
oracle. Cave in the Magdalenian perspective derives from KAL for cave,
Underworld, inverse LAK naming a lake, CA LAK was the heavenly lake or river,
later overformed by Galaxy 'Milky Way'. Woman and cave have no common origin
in Magdalenian, although there is a mythological connection, the Divine Hind
or Hind Woman from Altamira calling life into existence, also moon bulls,
thus creating time, periods of 30 29 30 29 30 29 30 29 30 29 30 ... days or
nights for 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ... lunations or synodic months.
Sorry for the sloppy formulations. GYN for woman would account for Greek
gynae 'woman', inverse NYG for nyx 'night' and Nyx, goddess of the night.
Her mother was Elaia, goddess of olives; or Demeter-Elaia, Demeter the
goddess of agriculture; or Black Demeter Melaina, personifying droughts
and famines, worshipped in Elaia's grove at Phigalia (Pausanias), implored
for mercy - Pan playing a sweet melody on his flute made her soften and
spare people from starving. Nyx was a powerful goddess, feared by all,
even by Zeus (who personified the day as the supreme sky god). Nyx was
a chthonic goddess and had been equated with Gaia. By the way, the first
pair of inverses I encountered was AC for an expanse of land with water
(village names like Rouffignac and Cognac in the Guyenne) and CA for sky
(Old Latin caelum) while the compound AC CA named the Indo-European earth
goddess akka (a stammered name according to Pokorny, a meaningful name in
my opinion), the Sanskrit mother akka, and Hebrew Hawwa 'mother of all life'
English Eve. The inverse compound CA AC may have named Gaia. Those names
invoked the Great Goddess of old , her body symbolizing the fertile earth,
her breasts and arms (combined in some violin idols from the Cyclades)
the surface of the earth where we live and are active (arms) and find our
nourishment (breasts nourishing babies), and her head the sky, her eyes
moon and sun.
Daud Deden is right in connecting milk and honey Latin mel that may also
account for mel-ody (story of Pan above). Elaia as goddess of olives (elaia
'olive') provided oil and was associated with a giant bee on the gold ring
from Mokhlos, Crete. Marija Gimbutas presents a
'Bull-horned bee goddess in the shape of a bee' rendered on a stylized
bull's head of bone. Bilcze Zlote, northwestern Ukraine. Late Cucuteni.
Fourth millennium BC.
in my opinion (a heir of) the Orion goddess, emanation of the Divine Hind
Woman in Magdalenian times who sent moon bulls from Aldebaran in Taurus
'Bull' on their heavenly mission. Fermented honey and water yielded mead,
bulls provided meat, and blood of sacrificed bulls may have been sprinkled
on the ground in rites of making the land fertile.
Sounds can well reveal connections, but phonetical similarities alone
are not enough, they can also lead astray. Etymology is no less demanding
than taxonomy in biology. The minimum requirement for participating in
a scientific forum on language is to consult etymologies, best in university
libraries, but there are also fine sources online.
PS I showed up in here because Ross, unwisely, rubbed his oil lamp ...
***@Andamans: tongue, speech
***@Malay: eat
***@Tigrinha: speech
spe.ake.r/spa.ak.st/spr.eche.n/bah.asa./puh.utko./c.aka.p/bic.ara./han.ase...
b***@ihug.co.nz
2017-11-05 06:55:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Daud Deden
Post by Franz Gnaedinger
Post by Franz Gnaedinger
Not my trick, anticipated by Richard Fester, then accounting for my first law
of Magdalenian: inverse forms have related meanings. I derive woman from GYN
Greek gynae, inverse NYG for night and Nyx, taboo name of Despoina 'mistress',
alter ego of Demeter. Nyx was a poterful goddess feared even by Zeus. The
Elaia side or disc of the Phaistos Disc tells how to evoke her and get her
oracle. Cave in the Magdalenian perspective derives from KAL for cave,
Underworld, inverse LAK naming a lake, CA LAK was the heavenly lake or river,
later overformed by Galaxy 'Milky Way'. Woman and cave have no common origin
in Magdalenian, although there is a mythological connection, the Divine Hind
or Hind Woman from Altamira calling life into existence, also moon bulls,
thus creating time, periods of 30 29 30 29 30 29 30 29 30 29 30 ... days or
nights for 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ... lunations or synodic months.
Sorry for the sloppy formulations. GYN for woman would account for Greek
gynae 'woman', inverse NYG for nyx 'night' and Nyx, goddess of the night.
Her mother was Elaia, goddess of olives; or Demeter-Elaia, Demeter the
goddess of agriculture; or Black Demeter Melaina, personifying droughts
and famines, worshipped in Elaia's grove at Phigalia (Pausanias), implored
for mercy - Pan playing a sweet melody on his flute made her soften and
spare people from starving. Nyx was a powerful goddess, feared by all,
even by Zeus (who personified the day as the supreme sky god). Nyx was
a chthonic goddess and had been equated with Gaia. By the way, the first
pair of inverses I encountered was AC for an expanse of land with water
(village names like Rouffignac and Cognac in the Guyenne) and CA for sky
(Old Latin caelum) while the compound AC CA named the Indo-European earth
goddess akka (a stammered name according to Pokorny, a meaningful name in
my opinion), the Sanskrit mother akka, and Hebrew Hawwa 'mother of all life'
English Eve. The inverse compound CA AC may have named Gaia. Those names
invoked the Great Goddess of old , her body symbolizing the fertile earth,
her breasts and arms (combined in some violin idols from the Cyclades)
the surface of the earth where we live and are active (arms) and find our
nourishment (breasts nourishing babies), and her head the sky, her eyes
moon and sun.
Daud Deden is right in connecting milk and honey Latin mel that may also
account for mel-ody (story of Pan above). Elaia as goddess of olives (elaia
'olive') provided oil and was associated with a giant bee on the gold ring
from Mokhlos, Crete. Marija Gimbutas presents a
'Bull-horned bee goddess in the shape of a bee' rendered on a stylized
bull's head of bone. Bilcze Zlote, northwestern Ukraine. Late Cucuteni.
Fourth millennium BC.
in my opinion (a heir of) the Orion goddess, emanation of the Divine Hind
Woman in Magdalenian times who sent moon bulls from Aldebaran in Taurus
'Bull' on their heavenly mission. Fermented honey and water yielded mead,
bulls provided meat, and blood of sacrificed bulls may have been sprinkled
on the ground in rites of making the land fertile.
Sounds can well reveal connections, but phonetical similarities alone
are not enough, they can also lead astray. Etymology is no less demanding
than taxonomy in biology. The minimum requirement for participating in
a scientific forum on language is to consult etymologies, best in university
libraries, but there are also fine sources online.
PS I showed up in here because Ross, unwisely, rubbed his oil lamp ...
spe.ake.r/spa.ak.st/spr.eche.n/bah.asa./puh.utko./c.aka.p/bic.ara./han.ase...
The technical term for this is "word salad".
Daud Deden
2017-11-05 17:05:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@ihug.co.nz
Post by Daud Deden
Post by Franz Gnaedinger
Post by Franz Gnaedinger
Not my trick, anticipated by Richard Fester, then accounting for my first law
of Magdalenian: inverse forms have related meanings. I derive woman from GYN
Greek gynae, inverse NYG for night and Nyx, taboo name of Despoina 'mistress',
alter ego of Demeter. Nyx was a poterful goddess feared even by Zeus. The
Elaia side or disc of the Phaistos Disc tells how to evoke her and get her
oracle. Cave in the Magdalenian perspective derives from KAL for cave,
Underworld, inverse LAK naming a lake, CA LAK was the heavenly lake or river,
later overformed by Galaxy 'Milky Way'. Woman and cave have no common origin
in Magdalenian, although there is a mythological connection, the Divine Hind
or Hind Woman from Altamira calling life into existence, also moon bulls,
thus creating time, periods of 30 29 30 29 30 29 30 29 30 29 30 ... days or
nights for 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ... lunations or synodic months.
Sorry for the sloppy formulations. GYN for woman would account for Greek
gynae 'woman', inverse NYG for nyx 'night' and Nyx, goddess of the night.
Her mother was Elaia, goddess of olives; or Demeter-Elaia, Demeter the
goddess of agriculture; or Black Demeter Melaina, personifying droughts
and famines, worshipped in Elaia's grove at Phigalia (Pausanias), implored
for mercy - Pan playing a sweet melody on his flute made her soften and
spare people from starving. Nyx was a powerful goddess, feared by all,
even by Zeus (who personified the day as the supreme sky god). Nyx was
a chthonic goddess and had been equated with Gaia. By the way, the first
pair of inverses I encountered was AC for an expanse of land with water
(village names like Rouffignac and Cognac in the Guyenne) and CA for sky
(Old Latin caelum) while the compound AC CA named the Indo-European earth
goddess akka (a stammered name according to Pokorny, a meaningful name in
my opinion), the Sanskrit mother akka, and Hebrew Hawwa 'mother of all life'
English Eve. The inverse compound CA AC may have named Gaia. Those names
invoked the Great Goddess of old , her body symbolizing the fertile earth,
her breasts and arms (combined in some violin idols from the Cyclades)
the surface of the earth where we live and are active (arms) and find our
nourishment (breasts nourishing babies), and her head the sky, her eyes
moon and sun.
Daud Deden is right in connecting milk and honey Latin mel that may also
account for mel-ody (story of Pan above). Elaia as goddess of olives (elaia
'olive') provided oil and was associated with a giant bee on the gold ring
from Mokhlos, Crete. Marija Gimbutas presents a
'Bull-horned bee goddess in the shape of a bee' rendered on a stylized
bull's head of bone. Bilcze Zlote, northwestern Ukraine. Late Cucuteni.
Fourth millennium BC.
in my opinion (a heir of) the Orion goddess, emanation of the Divine Hind
Woman in Magdalenian times who sent moon bulls from Aldebaran in Taurus
'Bull' on their heavenly mission. Fermented honey and water yielded mead,
bulls provided meat, and blood of sacrificed bulls may have been sprinkled
on the ground in rites of making the land fertile.
Sounds can well reveal connections, but phonetical similarities alone
are not enough, they can also lead astray. Etymology is no less demanding
than taxonomy in biology. The minimum requirement for participating in
a scientific forum on language is to consult etymologies, best in university
libraries, but there are also fine sources online.
PS I showed up in here because Ross, unwisely, rubbed his oil lamp ...
spe.ake.r/spa.ak.st/spr.eche.n/bah.asa./puh.utko./c.aka.p/bic.ara./han.ase...
The technical term for this is "word salad".
Better to use the right word: speech. (compare sp.eak to eat to m.eat)
Daud Deden
2017-10-29 19:42:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Daud Deden
-
Zavat ~ sabath = spilleth, the rest
Chalab ~ (Kh/Ch)ala(v/b) ~ Xalav
Xyuambuatluaxyua (keyword)
XyuA.mbua.tLAxyVa: sieve.mother.leak > mVlk
(xyua)mBuatLuaXyua (keyword)
-
https://www.biblestudytools.com/lexicons/hebrew/kjv/chalab.html 
Strong's Number: 02461
Word Origin blx
from the same as (02459)
Transliterated Word
TDNT Entry
Chalab
TWOT - 650a
Kyriakos S.: "About a possible connection between "blood" and "honey", we have discussed about a similar hypothesis at Giacomo's posts; we were talking about Gr. haima for "blood" and a norwegian *seim meaning something like "thick fluid, honey" and Giacomo has said that if it was *saim- it would fit perfect to haima "blood" morphologically and semantically as "thick fluid". He gave this link: https://www.dwds.de/wb/seimig
"

Xyambuatla ~ *shaim.blt thick fluid/blood/milk/mud/honey ~ Baltic: white(milky)
Note: if tiny droplets or mist or dry grains, then Xyua(mbuatla) ~ ***@Grk:drizzle: small piece, drizzle
-
KS: ψακάς@Grk:psakas/1 ψάω:psao: any small piece broken off, grains of sand, droplet, drizzling/trickling rain ~ başāş***@Akkadian: "to trickle" ~ bāşu/bāşş***@Akk.: sand ~ ***@Sanskrit: chewed, macerated ~ ****@Sanskrit

"Sum. mud "to create" Akk. banû was from a **mat or mot < **mrt < **prt < (kṛt-."

Lith wiki: Since *dK- regularly yielded *iKt- in Greek (compare ἰκτῖνος ‎(iktînos‎), ἑκατόν ‎(hekatón‎)), Proto-Indo-European *d- as opposed to *dʰ- must be reconstructed, encouraging a connection with the root *deǵʰ- ‎(“liquid?”‎); compare Old Irish deug ‎(“drink, draught, potion”‎), Lithuanian dažaĩ ‎(“paint, dye”‎). A similar semantic path can be observed in ūdra ‎(“otter”‎) from *wed- ‎(“water”‎) [2]



h/t NJarya blog
Peter T. Daniels
2017-10-29 20:42:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Daud Deden
Kyriakos S.: "About a possible connection between "blood" and "honey", we have discussed about a similar hypothesis at Giacomo's posts; we were talking about Gr. haima for "blood" and a norwegian *seim meaning something like "thick fluid, honey" and Giacomo has said that if it was *saim- it would fit perfect to haima "blood" morphologically and semantically as "thick fluid". He gave this link: https://www.dwds.de/wb/seimig
"
Anyone who knows honey also knows blood. It is improbable that one word / root
could serve for both. HOWEVER, clearly "blood" is something that could easily
become taboo, and "honey" might be adopted as a euphemism for it. That indicates
that words with those meanings are NOT related.
b***@ihug.co.nz
2017-10-30 01:09:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Daud Deden
Kyriakos S.: "About a possible connection between "blood" and "honey", we have discussed about a similar hypothesis at Giacomo's posts; we were talking about Gr. haima for "blood" and a norwegian *seim meaning something like "thick fluid, honey" and Giacomo has said that if it was *saim- it would fit perfect to haima "blood" morphologically and semantically as "thick fluid". He gave this link: https://www.dwds.de/wb/seimig
"
Anyone who knows honey also knows blood. It is improbable that one word / root
could serve for both. HOWEVER, clearly "blood" is something that could easily
become taboo, and "honey" might be adopted as a euphemism for it. That indicates
that words with those meanings are NOT related.
Well, if you mean that the tabooed word is probably not cognate with the
word that replaces it, yes. But there could be a "blood"/"honey" connection
via a word with some more general meaning. This seems to be what
DD's friends (or whoever Kyriakos S. and Giacomo are) were talking
about. It's not a new discovery. Watkins (2nd ed.,2000) includes *sai-3
'thick liquid' as a "possible root", with a reference to Porkorny, who
connects the Greek "blood" word with Germanic things like German Seim
'mucilage, liquid honey'. Given that *h₁ésh₂r̥ is apparently the most
likely PIE for 'blood', Greek haim- could well be a taboo replacement.
(Apparently eiar, the expected reflex, is attested in poetry.)
Daud Deden
2017-10-31 17:11:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Daud Deden
Kyriakos S.: "About a possible connection between "blood" and "honey", we have discussed about a similar hypothesis at Giacomo's posts; we were talking about Gr. haima for "blood" and a norwegian *seim meaning something like "thick fluid, honey" and Giacomo has said that if it was *saim- it would fit perfect to haima "blood" morphologically and semantically as "thick fluid". He gave this link: https://www.dwds.de/wb/seimig
"
Anyone who knows honey also knows blood. It is improbable that one word / root
could serve for both. HOWEVER, clearly "blood" is something that could easily
become taboo, and "honey" might be adopted as a euphemism for it. That indicates
that words with those meanings are NOT related.
I'm uncertain on that. Honey as raw food, blood only in raw/living/life-giving situations.

milk/*ymbualuagy/ imbue + atl/agua
blood~broth(er)~(brood)~ ***@Aztec:both/brother ~ ***@Basque:blood/*buatl
honey/madhu(mother's dew?)-meli/*mbuatluay

thickly/sticky/trickly/drizzly - slow flow/viscose
Peter T. Daniels
2017-10-31 20:07:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Daud Deden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Daud Deden
Kyriakos S.: "About a possible connection between "blood" and "honey", we have discussed about a similar hypothesis at Giacomo's posts; we were talking about Gr. haima for "blood" and a norwegian *seim meaning something like "thick fluid, honey" and Giacomo has said that if it was *saim- it would fit perfect to haima "blood" morphologically and semantically as "thick fluid". He gave this link: https://www.dwds.de/wb/seimig
"
Anyone who knows honey also knows blood. It is improbable that one word / root
could serve for both. HOWEVER, clearly "blood" is something that could easily
become taboo, and "honey" might be adopted as a euphemism for it. That indicates
that words with those meanings are NOT related.
I'm uncertain on that. Honey as raw food, blood only in raw/living/life-giving situations.
I haven't the slightest idea what that (false) claim has to do with what I said.

The mention of "raw" suggests you might benefit from reading Claude Lévi-Strauss.
Post by Daud Deden
milk/*ymbualuagy/ imbue + atl/agua
honey/madhu(mother's dew?)-meli/*mbuatluay
thickly/sticky/trickly/drizzly - slow flow/viscose
Daud Deden
2017-11-01 16:16:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Daud Deden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Daud Deden
Kyriakos S.: "About a possible connection between "blood" and "honey", we have discussed about a similar hypothesis at Giacomo's posts; we were talking about Gr. haima for "blood" and a norwegian *seim meaning something like "thick fluid, honey" and Giacomo has said that if it was *saim- it would fit perfect to haima "blood" morphologically and semantically as "thick fluid". He gave this link: https://www.dwds.de/wb/seimig
"
Anyone who knows honey also knows blood. It is improbable that one word / root
could serve for both. HOWEVER, clearly "blood" is something that could easily
become taboo, and "honey" might be adopted as a euphemism for it. That indicates
that words with those meanings are NOT related.
I'm uncertain on that. Honey as raw food, blood only in raw/living/life-giving situations.
I haven't the slightest idea what that (false) claim has to do with what I said.
You said: > Anyone who knows honey also knows blood

Blood was known long before honey was known. At what point in time words were used to describe either is not known, but both link closely to mother's milk.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The mention of "raw" suggests you might benefit from reading Claude Lévi-Strauss.
I'm sure I've done that.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Daud Deden
milk/*ymbualuagy/ imbue + atl/agua
honey/madhu(mother's dew?)-meli/*mbuatluay
thickly/sticky/trickly/drizzly - slow flow/viscose
Peter T. Daniels
2017-11-01 16:22:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Daud Deden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Daud Deden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Kyriakos S.: "About a possible connection between "blood" and "honey", we have discussed about a similar hypothesis at Giacomo's posts; we were talking about Gr. haima for "blood" and a norwegian *seim meaning something like "thick fluid, honey" and Giacomo has said that if it was *saim- it would fit perfect to haima "blood" morphologically and semantically as "thick fluid". He gave this link: https://www.dwds.de/wb/seimig"
Anyone who knows honey also knows blood. It is improbable that one word / root
could serve for both. HOWEVER, clearly "blood" is something that could easily
become taboo, and "honey" might be adopted as a euphemism for it. That indicates
that words with those meanings are NOT related.
I'm uncertain on that. Honey as raw food, blood only in raw/living/life-giving situations.
I haven't the slightest idea what that (false) claim has to do with what I said.
You said: > Anyone who knows honey also knows blood
Blood was known long before honey was known. At what point in time words were used to describe either is not known, but both link closely to mother's milk.
I see you have a problem with elementary logic.

I said: IF A. knows honey, THEN A. knows blood.

The only thing that that statement says about blood-knowing is:

IF A. does not know blood, THEN A. does not know honey.
Post by Daud Deden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The mention of "raw" suggests you might benefit from reading Claude Lévi-Strauss.
I'm sure I've done that.
There's no evidence in your misuse of language comparison to suggest that you have.
Daud Deden
2017-11-01 19:36:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Daud Deden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Daud Deden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Kyriakos S.: "About a possible connection between "blood" and "honey", we have discussed about a similar hypothesis at Giacomo's posts; we were talking about Gr. haima for "blood" and a norwegian *seim meaning something like "thick fluid, honey" and Giacomo has said that if it was *saim- it would fit perfect to haima "blood" morphologically and semantically as "thick fluid". He gave this link: https://www.dwds.de/wb/seimig"
Anyone who knows honey also knows blood. It is improbable that one word / root
could serve for both. HOWEVER, clearly "blood" is something that could easily
become taboo, and "honey" might be adopted as a euphemism for it. That indicates
that words with those meanings are NOT related.
I'm uncertain on that. Honey as raw food, blood only in raw/living/life-giving situations.
I haven't the slightest idea what that (false) claim has to do with what I said.
You said: > Anyone who knows honey also knows blood
Blood was known long before honey was known. At what point in time words were used to describe either is not known, but both link closely to mother's milk.
I see you have a problem with elementary logic.
No. I agreed with your statement, but put it in a logical, temporally sequential format appropriate for linguistic evolution.

Blood before money, milk(cf. bilk) before both.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
I said: IF A. knows honey, THEN A. knows blood.
IF A. does not know blood, THEN A. does not know honey.
Post by Daud Deden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The mention of "raw" suggests you might benefit from reading Claude Lévi-Strauss.
I'm sure I've done that.
There's no evidence in your misuse of language comparison to suggest that you have.
Since I am listening to/looking at words differently than you, your claim does not surprise me at all.

Note that I do not do "language comparison" as you claim.

I study human language, preferentially pre-historic/paleo-etymological, largely by sounding out words and seeking patterns, starting with the tap root and ending at the leaves (metaphore).
Daud Deden
2017-11-01 15:54:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Daud Deden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Daud Deden
Kyriakos S.: "About a possible connection between "blood" and "honey", we have discussed about a similar hypothesis at Giacomo's posts; we were talking about Gr. haima for "blood" and a norwegian *seim meaning something like "thick fluid, honey" and Giacomo has said that if it was *saim- it would fit perfect to haima "blood" morphologically and semantically as "thick fluid". He gave this link: https://www.dwds.de/wb/seimig
"
Anyone who knows honey also knows blood. It is improbable that one word / root
could serve for both. HOWEVER, clearly "blood" is something that could easily
become taboo, and "honey" might be adopted as a euphemism for it. That indicates
that words with those meanings are NOT related.
I'm uncertain on that. Honey as raw food, blood only in raw/living/life-giving situations.
milk/*ymbualuagy/ imbue + atl/agua
honey/madhu(mother's dew?)-meli/*mbuatluay
thickly/sticky/trickly/drizzly - slow flow/viscose
-
Possibility: El, Eloi, Elohi, Eli(j/sh/xy)a(h)@Hebrew ~ (m)el.i.t.u~meld ~mad.h.u ~ (M.Anu)

Meli.t.u  melt/molten mildew/jell/chill/gilded/golden filling/pooling
Odol blood broth bruise 
?Bread/***@Grm/***@Malay
Ambrosia, embryonic xyamb scramble/jumble/jam/merge ***@Aztec ~ yolk
***@Malay: blood
***@Malay: air
air/***@Malay: water
Co-agulate ~ xyua/sieve(powder) + ***@Malay: sugar = ***@Spanish
***@Spanish: blood ~ xyua + angre/ag_la_e/agulate?
***@Turk: honey

Merge-march-murder?/beaten = ***@Malay=memukul, ***@Malay:die

(***@NJ)
Skt. word comes from mRd crushing , grinding , rubbing , bruising ,

1. Pa. maddati ʻ crushes, treads on, kneads, jumbles, destroys ʼ; Pk. maddaï, maḍḍaï ʻ crushes, tramples on ʼ; K. mã̄ḍun ʻ to knead, mix ʼ (why long ā?); WPah.bhal. maḍṇū ʻ to thresh ʼ; N. mã̄ṛnu ʻ to rub, tread out ʼ; A. māriba ʻ to thresh, tread out (grain), mix by grinding ʼ; 
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