Discussion:
Mousehole, Cornwall
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Daud Deden
2018-10-01 19:11:59 UTC
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Mousehole, a former smuggler's haunt in Paul parish in southern Cornwall, between Penzance & Land's End.et

Etymology: probably from (per an old Cornish manuscript, as Moeshayle) a small river that runs through it Mo(w)es (young woman) & Hayle (river). Alternatively, from a now-collapsed cavern called Mouse Hole.

Old Cornish Rhyme:

I would that I were where I wish,
Out on the sea in a wooden dish,
But if that dish begins to fill,
I'd wish I were on Mousehole Hill.
Daud Deden
2018-10-01 19:13:52 UTC
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Above cited from The Little Country, by Charles de Lint.
Daud Deden
2018-10-01 22:40:36 UTC
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Post by Daud Deden
Above cited from The Little Country, by Charles de Lint.
OT: Thwaite

"cleared land," 1620s, from Old Norse or Old Danish þveit "a clearing, meadow, paddock [DD: cf park]," literally "a cutting, cut-piece" (related to Old English þwitan "to cut, cut off;" see whittle). Always a rare word and now obsolete, but frequently encountered in place names, but "It is unclear whether the base meaning was 'something cut off, detached piece of land,' or 'something cut down, felled tree' ..." [Cambridge Dictionary of English Place-Names].
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-10-02 06:31:11 UTC
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Post by Daud Deden
Mousehole, a former smuggler's haunt in Paul parish in southern
Cornwall, between Penzance & Land's End.et
Etymology: probably from (per an old Cornish manuscript, as Moeshayle)
a small river that runs through it Mo(w)es (young woman) & Hayle
(river). Alternatively, from a now-collapsed cavern called Mouse Hole.
Pronunciation: ['maʊzəl]. No doubt you know that, and it doesn't, of
course say much about the etymology.
--
athel
Daud Deden
2018-10-02 09:12:50 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Daud Deden
Mousehole, a former smuggler's haunt in Paul parish in southern
Cornwall, between Penzance & Land's End.et
Etymology: probably from (per an old Cornish manuscript, as Moeshayle)
a small river that runs through it Mo(w)es (young woman) & Hayle
(river). Alternatively, from a now-collapsed cavern called Mouse Hole.
Pronunciation: ['maʊzəl]. No doubt you know that, and it doesn't, of
course say much about the etymology
--
athel
Yes, the book noted that.
Daud Deden
2018-10-02 14:17:32 UTC
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Trivialities

The Hanway was Britain's first umbrella, in 1750.

The typewriter was invented before the fountain pen.

The Oreo cookie was originally shaped like a baseball mound thus the name.

French shepherds invented stilts to manage their herds through wetland marshes.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-10-02 15:08:43 UTC
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Post by Daud Deden
Trivialities
Where did you get these from, Ripley's Believe It or Not?
Post by Daud Deden
The Oreo cookie was originally shaped like a baseball mound thus the name.
What's that supposed to mean?
Daud Deden
2018-10-02 16:12:15 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Daud Deden
Trivialities
Where did you get these from, Ripley's Believe It or Not?
All things History, by Jane Flinn
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Daud Deden
The Oreo cookie was originally shaped like a baseball mound thus the name.
What's that supposed to mean?
I presume the pitcher's mound being analogous to Oreo: ancient Greek hill/mound.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-10-02 17:03:48 UTC
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Post by Daud Deden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Daud Deden
Trivialities
Where did you get these from, Ripley's Believe It or Not?
All things History, by Jane Flinn
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Daud Deden
The Oreo cookie was originally shaped like a baseball mound thus the name.
What's that supposed to mean?
I presume the pitcher's mound being analogous to Oreo: ancient Greek hill/mound.
Who makes a connection between "ancient Greek hill/mound" and either
"baseball mound" (whatever that was) or "pitcher's mound"?

Oreads are _mountain_ nymphs.
Daud Deden
2018-10-02 18:00:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Daud Deden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Daud Deden
Trivialities
Where did you get these from, Ripley's Believe It or Not?
All things History, by Jane Flinn
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Daud Deden
The Oreo cookie was originally shaped like a baseball mound thus the name.
What's that supposed to mean?
I presume the pitcher's mound being analogous to Oreo: ancient Greek hill/mound.
Who makes a connection between "ancient Greek hill/mound" and either
"baseball mound" (whatever that was) or "pitcher's mound"?
Oreads are _mountain_ nymphs.
Thoughtco website:

So where did the name "Oreo" come from? The people at Nabisco aren't quite sure. Some believe that the cookie's name was taken from the French word for gold, "or" (the main color on early Oreo packages).

Others claim the name stemmed from the shape of a hill-shaped test version; thus naming the cookie in Greek for mountain, "oreo."
-
It does sound a bit like (mong)***@PPygmy: dome (hut),
Cf (g)***@Amharic: hill,
(g)***@Malay: mount,
(b)***@Uighur: hill,
Aura/aurora etc.
Daud Deden
2018-10-02 20:25:40 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Daud Deden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Daud Deden
Trivialities
Where did you get these from, Ripley's Believe It or Not?
All things History, by Jane Flinn
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Daud Deden
The Oreo cookie was originally shaped like a baseball mound thus the name.
What's that supposed to mean?
I presume the pitcher's mound being analogous to Oreo: ancient Greek hill/mound.
Who makes a connection between "ancient Greek hill/mound" and either
"baseball mound" (whatever that was) or "pitcher's mound"?
Oreads are _mountain_ nymphs.
Unlike racquetball or softball, baseball is named for its bases. A baseball field is flat but for the pitcher's mound.

Hydrox is the brand name for a creme-filled chocolate sandwich cookie manufactured by Leaf Brands. It debuted in 1908, and was manufactured by Sunshine Biscuits for over 90 years.[1] The similar Oreo cookie, introduced in 1912, was inspired by the Hydrox. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrox
António Marques
2018-10-03 12:12:38 UTC
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Post by Daud Deden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Daud Deden
The Oreo cookie was originally shaped like a baseball mound thus the name.
What's that supposed to mean?
I presume the pitcher's mound being analogous to Oreo: ancient Greek hill/mound.
In that case it’s Greek, where does baseball enter into it?
Mścisław Wojna-Bojewski
2018-10-03 08:21:18 UTC
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Post by Daud Deden
Mousehole, a former smuggler's haunt in Paul parish in southern Cornwall, between Penzance & Land's End.et
Etymology: probably from (per an old Cornish manuscript, as Moeshayle) a small river that runs through it Mo(w)es (young woman) & Hayle (river). Alternatively, from a now-collapsed cavern called Mouse Hole.
I would that I were where I wish,
Out on the sea in a wooden dish,
But if that dish begins to fill,
I'd wish I were on Mousehole Hill.
Obviously, it has never occurred to you to learn Cornish.
António Marques
2018-10-03 12:12:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Daud Deden
Mousehole, a former smuggler's haunt in Paul parish in southern Cornwall,
between Penzance & Land's End.et
Etymology: probably from (per an old Cornish manuscript, as Moeshayle) a
small river that runs through it Mo(w)es (young woman) & Hayle (river).
Alternatively, from a now-collapsed cavern called Mouse Hole.
In Celtic, modifiers follow the noun.
Mścisław Wojna-Bojewski
2018-10-03 13:54:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by António Marques
Post by Daud Deden
Mousehole, a former smuggler's haunt in Paul parish in southern Cornwall,
between Penzance & Land's End.et
Etymology: probably from (per an old Cornish manuscript, as Moeshayle) a
small river that runs through it Mo(w)es (young woman) & Hayle (river).
Alternatively, from a now-collapsed cavern called Mouse Hole.
In Celtic, modifiers follow the noun.
He couldn't be bothered to learn a Celtic language.

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