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A Rosetta Stone Theory for Decoding the Voynich Manuscript
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Morten St. George
2018-09-30 16:46:24 UTC
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A Rosetta Stone Theory for Decoding the Voynich Manuscript is an essay in which I decipher the marginalia on the last page of the manuscript (f116v), demonstrating that it points to a four-line prophecy published externally in the 16th century and simultaneously to four lines of Voynich script on f104r, in an apparent source and output relationship.

http://manuscrit-de-voynich.com/index.html
Peter T. Daniels
2018-09-30 17:45:23 UTC
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Post by Morten St. George
A Rosetta Stone Theory for Decoding the Voynich Manuscript is an essay in which I decipher the marginalia on the last page of the manuscript (f116v), demonstrating that it points to a four-line prophecy published externally in the 16th century and simultaneously to four lines of Voynich script on f104r, in an apparent source and output relationship.
http://manuscrit-de-voynich.com/index.html
Yes, and?
Morten St. George
2018-09-30 20:15:28 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Morten St. George
A Rosetta Stone Theory for Decoding the Voynich Manuscript is an essay in which I decipher the marginalia on the last page of the manuscript (f116v), demonstrating that it points to a four-line prophecy published externally in the 16th century and simultaneously to four lines of Voynich script on f104r, in an apparent source and output relationship.
http://manuscrit-de-voynich.com/index.html
Yes, and?
And nothing. I merely posted that link in the event there's a would-be VMS decoder looking for something new to try.

Ideally, it would be a decoder of high status. Hundreds of people of my status are already claiming to have decoded the VMS to no avail.
Leo Anthony Sgouros
2018-09-30 21:09:10 UTC
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Post by Morten St. George
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Morten St. George
A Rosetta Stone Theory for Decoding the Voynich Manuscript is an essay in which I decipher the marginalia on the last page of the manuscript (f116v), demonstrating that it points to a four-line prophecy published externally in the 16th century and simultaneously to four lines of Voynich script on f104r, in an apparent source and output relationship.
http://manuscrit-de-voynich.com/index.html
Yes, and?
And nothing. I merely posted that link in the event there's a would-be VMS decoder looking for something new to try.
Ideally, it would be a decoder of high status. Hundreds of people of my status are already claiming to have decoded the VMS to no avail.
Out of curiosity, and I apologize in advance to the regulars, how does one attain high status in such an august body of "decoders"?
Peter T. Daniels
2018-10-01 01:21:14 UTC
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Post by Morten St. George
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Morten St. George
A Rosetta Stone Theory for Decoding the Voynich Manuscript is an essay in which I decipher the marginalia on the last page of the manuscript (f116v), demonstrating that it points to a four-line prophecy published externally in the 16th century and simultaneously to four lines of Voynich script on f104r, in an apparent source and output relationship.
http://manuscrit-de-voynich.com/index.html
Yes, and?
And nothing. I merely posted that link in the event there's a would-be VMS decoder looking for something new to try.
Ideally, it would be a decoder of high status. Hundreds of people of my status are already claiming to have decoded the VMS to no avail.
My point was, what success have you had in interpreting those four lines?
Morten St. George
2018-10-01 03:56:19 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
My point was, what success have you had in interpreting those four lines?
I imagine that you are inquiring if I have determined the precise mechanism whereby the four lines of glyphs convert into the given Spanish text. My response is that I have not undertaken any decoding activity beyond what I have put into my essay, so I have no successes or failures to report.

Someone with more time and better programming skills than I have is welcome to undertake that task. The possibilities on the substitution grille are not endless. A good programmer might be able to validate or refute the theory within a matter of weeks.

In addition to providing us with a four-line Rosetta Stone, the marginalia seems to indicate that the Voynich glyphs seen in recipes do not represent letters or even sounds. They are merely symbols for use on the circles of f57v. It's only the 68 glyphs (4 sets of 17), about half of which are seen in the recipes, that represent letters of the Latin alphabet.

Once determined the Latin letter represented by each of the 68 (per the indicated procedure), place it directly above the corresponding glyph in the blank circle above the 68. Place the Voynich string from the Rosetta Stone in the blank circle below the 68. Move this string around the circle to see what matches up in conjunction with the Rosetta Stone output. Simple.
Mścisław Wojna-Bojewski
2018-09-30 21:10:43 UTC
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Post by Morten St. George
A Rosetta Stone Theory for Decoding the Voynich Manuscript is an essay in which I decipher the marginalia on the last page of the manuscript (f116v), demonstrating that it points to a four-line prophecy published externally in the 16th century and simultaneously to four lines of Voynich script on f104r, in an apparent source and output relationship.
http://manuscrit-de-voynich.com/index.html
Another Voynich enthusiast. Go do something worthwhile. Learn a real language for instance.
Leo Anthony Sgouros
2018-09-30 21:13:41 UTC
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Post by Mścisław Wojna-Bojewski
Post by Morten St. George
A Rosetta Stone Theory for Decoding the Voynich Manuscript is an essay in which I decipher the marginalia on the last page of the manuscript (f116v), demonstrating that it points to a four-line prophecy published externally in the 16th century and simultaneously to four lines of Voynich script on f104r, in an apparent source and output relationship.
http://manuscrit-de-voynich.com/index.html
Another Voynich enthusiast. Go do something worthwhile. Learn a real language for instance.
Worse, a Nostradamus "expert". I just googled the poster, if this is not him, apologies.
https://www.24-7pressrelease.com/press-release/441271/morten-st-george-creates-a-sky-map-to-assist-seti-astronomers
Morten St. George
2018-09-30 23:35:14 UTC
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Post by Leo Anthony Sgouros
Worse, a Nostradamus "expert". I just googled the poster, if this is not him, apologies.
https://www.24-7pressrelease.com/press-release/441271/morten-st-george-creates-a-sky-map-to-assist-seti-astronomers
You got the right person. Being an expert in Nostradamus is precisely the reason I could see that the marginalia had focused meaning while no one else could. For the rest of our cherished academia, f116v is nothing more than a page of doodles and scribbles concerning goat's liver.
dimitris tzortzakakis
2018-10-03 03:12:14 UTC
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Post by Morten St. George
A Rosetta Stone Theory for Decoding the Voynich Manuscript is an essay in which I decipher the marginalia on the last page of the manuscript (f116v), demonstrating that it points to a four-line prophecy published externally in the 16th century and simultaneously to four lines of Voynich script on f104r, in an apparent source and output relationship.
http://manuscrit-de-voynich.com/index.html
I have a much more sinister theory:could the voynich manuscript
have been written by a marooned alien?as the script is not
written in any known human language, it will be impossible to
decipher without a proper dictionary of voynichese,and a phonetic
guide.some so called star diagrams might show our galaxy and
possibly where the home star of the writer is!and the plant
drawings might show the plants in his home planet!since they
don`t directly match with our plants.and as the character
distribution might not match any human language,might that mean
we`re not alone?just my 2 cents...
--
t


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
Morten St. George
2018-10-03 12:02:16 UTC
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Post by dimitris tzortzakakis
I have a much more sinister theory:could the voynich manuscript
have been written by a marooned alien?as the script is not
written in any known human language, it will be impossible to
decipher without a proper dictionary of voynichese,and a phonetic
guide.some so called star diagrams might show our galaxy and
possibly where the home star of the writer is!and the plant
drawings might show the plants in his home planet!since they
don`t directly match with our plants.and as the character
distribution might not match any human language,might that mean
we`re not alone?just my 2 cents...
--
You might be interested in my essay "A Brief History of Solomon's Prophecies" in which I speculate on the origins and medieval history of the Voynich Manuscript:

http://mortenstgeorge.net
Mścisław Wojna-Bojewski
2018-10-10 12:15:13 UTC
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Post by Morten St. George
You might be interested in my essay
He might not. Rest assured nobody might.
Morten St. George
2018-10-11 15:04:36 UTC
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Post by Mścisław Wojna-Bojewski
Post by Morten St. George
You might be interested in my essay
He might not. Rest assured nobody might.
I read that only 11% of evangelical Christians (a huge chunk of the American population) believe in evolution. In a world dominated by such massive ignorance, I was never expecting much interest in my theories but, outside the USA, the number should be slightly greater than nobody.

In particular, some people who live in the Solomon Islands might like to know why I think their islands were named after Solomon's prophecies and not after Solomon's mines as popularly believed. And some people who live in Peru might like to know my theory regarding the source of the Inca Prophecy that led to the rapid demise of the Inca Empire. And more…

http://mortenstgeorge.net
Peter T. Daniels
2018-10-11 15:38:46 UTC
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Post by Morten St. George
Post by Mścisław Wojna-Bojewski
Post by Morten St. George
You might be interested in my essay
He might not. Rest assured nobody might.
I read that only 11% of evangelical Christians (a huge chunk of the American population) believe in evolution. In a world dominated by such massive ignorance, I was never expecting much interest in my theories but, outside the USA, the number should be slightly greater than nobody.
89% of US evangelicals does not constitute a "world-dominating" number.
Post by Morten St. George
In particular, some people who live in the Solomon Islands might like to know why I think their islands were named after Solomon's prophecies and not after Solomon's mines as popularly believed.
What does the explorer who gave them a Western name say was the reason?
Post by Morten St. George
And some people who live in Peru might like to know my theory regarding the source of the Inca Prophecy that led to the rapid demise of the Inca Empire. And more…
Morten St. George
2018-10-12 05:07:18 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
89% of US evangelicals does not constitute a "world-dominating" number.
Sir, I did not refer to the evangelicals as having exclusive rights to ignorance but only as symptomatic of a global problem: religious extremism afflicts peoples throughout the Middle East and elsewhere around the globe. Worse of all, in some places, partisans of this ignorance have gained control of nuclear weapons. Unfortunately, people who have succumbed to religious fervor are incapable of seeing the dangers that lie ahead.

In the past, the grip of ignorance was temporarily broken by new discoveries, e.g. the discovery of America, the discovery of the planet Uranus, the discovery of fossils, et cetera. To some small degree, even my own theories, when and if any of them are proven to be factual, could prove helpful.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
What does the explorer who gave them a Western name say was the reason?
The explorer Pedro Sarmiento de Gamboa wrote:

"Y por este mismo titulo tambien puede Vuestra Majestad sin escrupulo mandar conquistar las islas del archipielago del Nombre de Jesus, vulgarmente llamadas de Salomon, aunque no lo son, de que yo di noticia y por mi persona las descubri el ano de 1567 anos."

A book called "The Discovery of the Solomon Islands," vol. I, inquires:

"Whence, then, came this name of the 'Isles of Solomon,' which seem by common consent to have been bestowed upon them? It is to be noticed that the name is not found in any of the MSS, except Sarmiento's."

Nearly twenty years after the discovery of those islands, a Portuguese prisoner told his English captors that those islands were where "Solomon fetched gold to adorn the temple of Jerusalem." But no gold or mines were ever found there, and no one who made the voyage of discovery ever gave any such explanation as to why they were called Solomon.

See my essay for more information.
Dr. HotSalt
2018-10-12 05:45:38 UTC
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Post by Morten St. George
Post by Peter T. Daniels
89% of US evangelicals does not constitute a "world-dominating" number.
Sir, I did not refer to the evangelicals as having exclusive rights to ignorance but only as symptomatic of a global problem: religious extremism
afflicts peoples throughout the Middle East and elsewhere around the globe. >Worse of all, in some places, partisans of this ignorance have gained control >of nuclear weapons. Unfortunately, people who have succumbed to religious >fervor are incapable of seeing the dangers that lie ahead.
You will notice that the largely Evangelist leaders of post-WWII America and the officially atheist leaders of the USSR mutually invented MAD rather than go to nuclear war at the first (or second or third or...) opportunity.

I am an American apatheist (I do not care whether or not deities exist). I find your... ideas... to be as much straw-grasping and unconvincing as any other attempt to decode the Voynich MS.
Post by Morten St. George
In the past, the grip of ignorance was temporarily broken by new discoveries,
e.g. the discovery of America, the discovery of the planet Uranus, the
discovery of fossils, et cetera. To some small degree, even my own theories,
when and if any of them are proven to be factual, could prove helpful.
Oh, dear. Do you place yourself among such discoverers?
Post by Morten St. George
Post by Peter T. Daniels
What does the explorer who gave them a Western name say was the reason?
Who cares what he wrote? He was second-in-command of the ships commanded by Alvaro de Mendaña de Neira who found the islands in 1568.

"In order to take credit of the discoveries for himself Mendaña threw the journals and maps made by Pedro Sarmiento de Gamboa overboard and abandoned him in Mexico. However, a trial was then held in Lima, with the result giving Sarmiento credit for the discoveries."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pedro_Sarmiento_de_Gamboa#Strait_of_Magellan

http://libweb5.princeton.edu/visual_materials/maps/websites/pacific/mendana-queiros/mendana-queiros.html

Never take the word of a liar and thief, who only went on the trip to escape the Inquisition:

"In Lima he was accused by the Inquisition of possessing two magic rings and some magic ink and of following the precepts of Moses. He then joined Álvaro de Mendaña's expedition through the southern Pacific Ocean..."

Driven by a combination of gold lust and "Christian fervor", de Mendaña basically tripped over the islands because it was thought at the time that the source of the fabled gold of the Temple at Jerusalem was in that part of the world. The islands were named later by the cartographers who integrated the legends and his ships' logs into their world maps.

Interesting how their ignorance helped break the worldwide grip of ignorance about the geography of Earth, isn't it?


Dr. HotSalt
António Marques
2018-10-12 12:56:10 UTC
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Post by Dr. HotSalt
Driven by a combination of gold lust and "Christian fervor", de Mendaña
basically tripped over the islands because it was thought at the time
that the source of the fabled gold of the Temple at Jerusalem was in that
part of the world. The islands were named later by the cartographers who
integrated the legends and his ships' logs into their world maps.
Interesting how their ignorance helped break the worldwide grip of
ignorance about the geography of Earth, isn't it?
Some modern folks, who’ve had 60 centuries of knowledge thrown at them, for
some reason think they’re responsible for it and revel in imagining how
ignorant some of their contemporaries are, and most of their predecessors.
Morten St. George
2018-10-12 16:18:52 UTC
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Post by Dr. HotSalt
You will notice that the largely Evangelist leaders of post-WWII America and the officially atheist leaders of the USSR mutually invented MAD rather than go to nuclear war at the first (or second or third or...) opportunity.
Gosh. Are you really claiming that contemporary world leaders are as sane as Eisenhower and JFK?
Post by Dr. HotSalt
Oh, dear. Do you place yourself among such discoverers?
I am confident that my deciphering of the VMS marginalia will lead to a fresh decoding of the stars section and that you evangelicals will find the stars content to be quite upsetting.
Post by Dr. HotSalt
Who cares what he wrote? He was second-in-command of the ships commanded by Alvaro de Mendaña de Neira who found the islands in 1568.
It can be dangerous to draw historical conclusions based solely on what you read online. The expedition was in fact the idea of Sarmiento who procured approval and financing for it, and, much to the discontent of Sarmiento, Mendaña was placed in charge by virtue of being the nephew of the viceroy.

According to Wikipedia, your liar and cheat was "a Spanish explorer, author, historian, mathematician, astronomer, and scientist," and conflict with the Inquisition can often be taken as a sure sign of a great scholar.
Post by Dr. HotSalt
Driven by a combination of gold lust and "Christian fervor", de Mendaña basically tripped over the islands because it was thought at the time that the source of the fabled gold of the Temple at Jerusalem was in that part of the world. The islands were named later by the cartographers who integrated the legends and his ships' logs into their world maps.
By which cartographers and on what dates? Sarmiento refers to them as Solomon in a manuscript dated 1572 (actually 1571 on our calendar).
Post by Dr. HotSalt
Interesting how their ignorance helped break the worldwide grip of ignorance about the geography of Earth, isn't it?
One of my more sensational theories runs as follows: Sarmiento, out of his lifelong desire to discover a great continent in the South Pacific and unhappy being an admiral in charge of warships, faked his death in 1592 and assumed the name of the famous Spanish playwright De la Vega. Accompanied by a couple of friends, naval captains in their own right, he went to Peru where, in 1595, he joined up with a new Mendaña expedition into the South Pacific and once again was second in command. On approaching the Solomon Islands, Sarmiento broke away from Mendaña's fleet and went on to discover Australia where he and his shipmates perished, possibly wiped out by man-eating aborigines. This theory draws support from cave drawings found by a modern Australian explorer, from a book called the New Atlantis, and from one of the stars prophecies.
Mścisław Wojna-Bojewski
2018-10-12 11:19:37 UTC
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Post by Morten St. George
Post by Mścisław Wojna-Bojewski
Post by Morten St. George
You might be interested in my essay
He might not. Rest assured nobody might.
I read that only 11% of evangelical Christians (a huge chunk of the American population) believe in evolution. In a world dominated by such massive ignorance, I was never expecting much interest in my theories but, outside the USA, the number should be slightly greater than nobody.
If your theories are of any importance, you can publish them in scholarly journals, which are not dominated by evangelical Christians. Noting that people can get even relatively stupid crap published in scholarly journals, the fact that nobody wants to publish your article pretty much settles the question of whether your theories are worthwhile at all. For Chrissake, even I get published sometimes.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-10-12 13:48:24 UTC
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Post by Mścisław Wojna-Bojewski
Post by Morten St. George
Post by Mścisław Wojna-Bojewski
Post by Morten St. George
You might be interested in my essay
He might not. Rest assured nobody might.
I read that only 11% of evangelical Christians (a huge chunk of the American population) believe in evolution. In a world dominated by such massive ignorance, I was never expecting much interest in my theories but, outside the USA, the number should be slightly greater than nobody.
If your theories are of any importance, you can publish them in scholarly journals, which are not dominated by evangelical Christians. Noting that people can get even relatively stupid crap published in scholarly journals, the fact that nobody wants to publish your article pretty much settles the question of whether your theories are worthwhile at all. For Chrissake, even I get published sometimes.
Yabbut what you publish is probably at least somewhat interesting.
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