Discussion:
Etymology of [ Stickler ]
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Hen Hanna
2018-11-04 16:21:50 UTC
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Etymology of [ Stickler ] -- i had 2 guesses and they were both wrong.
Tim Lang
2018-11-04 18:40:03 UTC
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Hi,
Post by Hen Hanna
Etymology of [ Stickler ] -- i had 2 guesses and they were both wrong.
(i) Stickler
--------

In Southgerman Dialects ("Oberdeutsch"); from Middle High German
(Mittelhochdeutsch) stichel "Hang, steiler Pfad". e. g. "Heinrich an der
Stichel", 1357, Tirol.

(This one is the main reasonable interpretation for Stickler in general.)

(ii) Stickel and Stickle:
------- -------

they mean Stichel (cf. Stich & stechen, stach, gestochen); s'thing
"pointed; thorn/y"; i. e. "Stachel, spitziges Ding". Mentioned in
documents: e. g. Besti Stickly, 1530, Ulm (Suebia).

(Caution: it might be mixed up: Stickl/e => Stückl/e, which
are Oberdeutsch (Bavarian and Suebian) variants of Stückhen, kleines
Stück; hence Stickle might generate a Stickler with the meaning
"Stückler", even if this would be highly unusual.)

(iii) Sti(e)gler, Sti(e)glmay(e)r, Sti(e)glbauer:
---------- --------------- -------------

someone who's house/abode is @ "am Stiegle (kl. Treppe, Stufen, am
Flurzaun)." (stairs or so)

Cf. Middle High German stigele as well as contemporary German: die
Stiege. Stieg(e)le is the Suebian diminutival form of Stiege ("stairs",
in general), and is understood as such in every today's regional German
dialect. So are de derivated Stiegler, Stiegelmeier, Stiegelbauer (the
one who builds/creates such stairs).

Stiegler might be misspelled as Sti(c)kler, esp. outside Germany,
Austria, Switzerland, Luxembourg or transliterated as such in Yiddish.

(iv) has nothing to do with the (nick)name Sti(g)glitz (goldfinch!).
-----------

But never say never. :-) This one means "Vogelhändler" (bird-dealer,
fowler).

*

So, the main ideas are:

Stiege (anything stairs-like or chute-like) vs Stich/el, Stachel vs
Stück(l) vs Stieglitz (goldfinch).

HTH
Tim
--
source: Bahlow's "Deutsches Namenlexikon" (Suhrkamp publ. house)
Daud Deden
2018-11-05 03:38:46 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
Etymology of [ Stickler ] -- i had 2 guesses and they were both wrong.
Stickel as diminutive of stick/stab/jab/Jambo;
Stickler as actor (person or thorn) doing the sticking.
Hen Hanna
2018-11-06 20:41:48 UTC
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Post by Daud Deden
Post by Hen Hanna
Etymology of [ Stickler ] -- i had 2 guesses and they were both wrong.
Stickel as diminutive of stick/stab/jab/Jambo;
Stickler as actor (person or thorn) doing the sticking.
--- doing the sticking, or stickling ?



Thanks (also to Tim Lang) for commenting.

actually, i thnk one of my guesses was right.


i can surely use the verb [stickle] every day for the 2 next weeks,
if i wanted to.
BUT i've never used it in my life.


i'd guess that the verb [stickle] has not been used
in a normal (non-humorous) way
for the last 60 years.


_____________________

1897, Henry James, What Maisie Knew:

‘She has other people than poor little you to think about, and has gone abroad with them; so you needn’t be in the least afraid she’ll stickle this time for her rights.’

_____________________

1837, Thomas Carlyle, The French Revolution: A History

Miserable new Berline! Why could not Royalty go in some old Berline similar to that of other men? Flying for life, one does not stickle about his vehicle.

_____________________

Dryden

When he [the angel] sees half of the Christians killed, and the rest in a fair way of being routed, he stickles betwixt the remainder of God’s host and the race of fiends.

_____________________


Dryden

for paltry punk they roar and stickle

_____________________

Hazlitt

the obstinacy with which he stickles for the wrong

_____________________
Daud Deden
2018-11-06 23:20:45 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Daud Deden
Post by Hen Hanna
Etymology of [ Stickler ] -- i had 2 guesses and they were both wrong.
Stickel as diminutive of stick/stab/jab/Jambo;
Stickler as actor (person or thorn) doing the sticking.
--- doing the sticking, or stickling ?
tickling & tackling?
Post by Hen Hanna
Thanks (also to Tim Lang) for commenting.
actually, i thnk one of my guesses was right.
i can surely use the verb [stickle] every day for the 2 next weeks,
if i wanted to.
BUT i've never used it in my life.
i'd guess that the verb [stickle] has not been used
in a normal (non-humorous) way
for the last 60 years.
_____________________
‘She has other people than poor little you to think about, and has gone abroad with them; so you needn’t be in the least afraid she’ll stickle this time for her rights.’
_____________________
1837, Thomas Carlyle, The French Revolution: A History
Miserable new Berline! Why could not Royalty go in some old Berline similar to that of other men? Flying for life, one does not stickle about his vehicle.
_____________________
Dryden
When he [the angel] sees half of the Christians killed, and the rest in a fair way of being routed, he stickles betwixt the remainder of God’s host and the race of fiends.
_____________________
Dryden
for paltry punk they roar and stickle
_____________________
Hazlitt
the obstinacy with which he stickles for the wrong
_____________________
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