Discussion:
What is the word for the stick & handkerchief carried over a vagrant's shoulder?
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Nancy Pi Squared
2006-10-26 20:39:55 UTC
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What is the stick called that a vagrant ties the red & white polka dot
handkerchief to?

I can google 'till the cows come home but I haven't found what that stick,
held over one shoulder, is actually called?

What about the little handkerchief that the same vagabond ties to the
stick?

What is that handkerchief called?

Do these two things they tote about have names?
Thanks,
Nancy
Mike Lyle
2006-10-26 20:45:32 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What is the stick called that a vagrant ties the red & white polka dot
handkerchief to?
I can google 'till the cows come home but I haven't found what that stick,
held over one shoulder, is actually called?
What about the little handkerchief that the same vagabond ties to the
stick?
What is that handkerchief called?
Do these two things they tote about have names?
Good question. But I'm afraid the stick is just a stick, and the
handkerchief/kerchief/bandana/piece of cloth has no special name,
either.
--
Mike.
Gamma
2006-10-27 00:33:49 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Mike Lyle
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What is the stick called that a vagrant ties the red & white polka dot
handkerchief to?
I can google 'till the cows come home but I haven't found what that stick,
held over one shoulder, is actually called?
What about the little handkerchief that the same vagabond ties to the
stick?
What is that handkerchief called?
Do these two things they tote about have names?
Good question. But I'm afraid the stick is just a stick, and the
handkerchief/kerchief/bandana/piece of cloth has no special name,
either.
I think this is what Australians in particular call a "swag". Maybe not
so much the stick but the belongings anyway.

<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swag>
Peter T. Daniels
2006-10-27 01:37:05 UTC
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Post by Gamma
Post by Mike Lyle
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What is the stick called that a vagrant ties the red & white polka dot
handkerchief to?
I can google 'till the cows come home but I haven't found what that stick,
held over one shoulder, is actually called?
What about the little handkerchief that the same vagabond ties to the
stick?
What is that handkerchief called?
Do these two things they tote about have names?
Good question. But I'm afraid the stick is just a stick, and the
handkerchief/kerchief/bandana/piece of cloth has no special name,
either.
I think this is what Australians in particular call a "swag". Maybe not
so much the stick but the belongings anyway.
In the US "swag" used to be the fruits of a robbery, and these days
mostly refers to the freebies or "gift bags" that are given to
celebrities who attend an event, and by further extension, any sort of
esteemable giveaways (when Oprah gave a car to everyone in her audience
that day, that was swag, too).
Eric Schwartz
2006-10-27 01:42:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
In the US "swag" used to be the fruits of a robbery, and these days
mostly refers to the freebies or "gift bags" that are given to
celebrities who attend an event, and by further extension, any sort of
esteemable giveaways (when Oprah gave a car to everyone in her audience
that day, that was swag, too).
"Swag" also refers to freebies given to convention attendees by
vendors or sponsors of the convention.

-=Eric
Tony Cooper
2006-10-27 13:09:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Eric Schwartz
Post by Peter T. Daniels
In the US "swag" used to be the fruits of a robbery, and these days
mostly refers to the freebies or "gift bags" that are given to
celebrities who attend an event, and by further extension, any sort of
esteemable giveaways (when Oprah gave a car to everyone in her audience
that day, that was swag, too).
"Swag" also refers to freebies given to convention attendees by
vendors or sponsors of the convention.
And, this time of the year in the US, a term to describe what the
children bring home in their trick-or-treat bags.
--
Tony Cooper
Orlando, FL
Eric Schwartz
2006-10-27 15:37:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Eric Schwartz
"Swag" also refers to freebies given to convention attendees by
vendors or sponsors of the convention.
And, this time of the year in the US, a term to describe what the
children bring home in their trick-or-treat bags.
Hrm, I don't think we ever called it "swag" in eastern Tennessee
WIWAL. I'm trying to think of what we *did* call it, but offhand,
nothing leaps to mind. Probably "loot", or simply "candy".

-=Eric
Peter T. Daniels
2006-10-27 17:02:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Eric Schwartz
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Eric Schwartz
"Swag" also refers to freebies given to convention attendees by
vendors or sponsors of the convention.
And, this time of the year in the US, a term to describe what the
children bring home in their trick-or-treat bags.
Hrm, I don't think we ever called it "swag" in eastern Tennessee
WIWAL. I'm trying to think of what we *did* call it, but offhand,
nothing leaps to mind. Probably "loot", or simply "candy".
It's _very_ recent in all but the criminal sense.
LFS
2006-10-27 17:10:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Eric Schwartz
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Eric Schwartz
"Swag" also refers to freebies given to convention attendees by
vendors or sponsors of the convention.
And, this time of the year in the US, a term to describe what the
children bring home in their trick-or-treat bags.
Hrm, I don't think we ever called it "swag" in eastern Tennessee
WIWAL. I'm trying to think of what we *did* call it, but offhand,
nothing leaps to mind. Probably "loot", or simply "candy".
It's _very_ recent in all but the criminal sense.
Not sure what you mean by very recent. OED cites examples of swag
meaning of bunches of flowers or fruit to the late 18th century (same
for the criminal sense) and the Australian swag to the 19th.
--
Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
Peter T. Daniels
2006-10-27 17:15:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by LFS
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Eric Schwartz
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Eric Schwartz
"Swag" also refers to freebies given to convention attendees by
vendors or sponsors of the convention.
And, this time of the year in the US, a term to describe what the
children bring home in their trick-or-treat bags.
Hrm, I don't think we ever called it "swag" in eastern Tennessee
WIWAL. I'm trying to think of what we *did* call it, but offhand,
nothing leaps to mind. Probably "loot", or simply "candy".
It's _very_ recent in all but the criminal sense.
Not sure what you mean by very recent. OED cites examples of swag
meaning of bunches of flowers or fruit to the late 18th century (same
for the criminal sense) and the Australian swag to the 19th.
What have we been talking about? We have been talking about the
extension from 'proceeds of criminal activity' to 'free gift you get
for just showing up'.

What does that have to do with either bunches of flowers or fruit, or
the Australian swag?
Tony Cooper
2006-10-27 18:26:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 27 Oct 2006 10:15:36 -0700, "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by LFS
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Eric Schwartz
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Eric Schwartz
"Swag" also refers to freebies given to convention attendees by
vendors or sponsors of the convention.
And, this time of the year in the US, a term to describe what the
children bring home in their trick-or-treat bags.
Hrm, I don't think we ever called it "swag" in eastern Tennessee
WIWAL. I'm trying to think of what we *did* call it, but offhand,
nothing leaps to mind. Probably "loot", or simply "candy".
It's _very_ recent in all but the criminal sense.
Not sure what you mean by very recent. OED cites examples of swag
meaning of bunches of flowers or fruit to the late 18th century (same
for the criminal sense) and the Australian swag to the 19th.
What have we been talking about? We have been talking about the
extension from 'proceeds of criminal activity' to 'free gift you get
for just showing up'.
"Swag" is certainly a term for the proceeds of criminal activity, but
it's perfectly acceptable to use the term to describe non-criminal
activity if there is no intent to falsely portray the proceeds as
criminally obtained. Halloween candy can be described as "swag",
"loot" or "booty" just as you can say "The little buggers held me up
for a fistful of candy" without meaning "buggers" in that other sense
or "held me up" in the sense of an actual robbery.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
What does that have to do with either bunches of flowers or fruit, or
the Australian swag?
--
Tony Cooper
Orlando, FL
Harlan Messinger
2006-10-27 18:33:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On 27 Oct 2006 10:15:36 -0700, "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by LFS
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Eric Schwartz
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Eric Schwartz
"Swag" also refers to freebies given to convention attendees by
vendors or sponsors of the convention.
And, this time of the year in the US, a term to describe what the
children bring home in their trick-or-treat bags.
Hrm, I don't think we ever called it "swag" in eastern Tennessee
WIWAL. I'm trying to think of what we *did* call it, but offhand,
nothing leaps to mind. Probably "loot", or simply "candy".
It's _very_ recent in all but the criminal sense.
Not sure what you mean by very recent. OED cites examples of swag
meaning of bunches of flowers or fruit to the late 18th century (same
for the criminal sense) and the Australian swag to the 19th.
What have we been talking about? We have been talking about the
extension from 'proceeds of criminal activity' to 'free gift you get
for just showing up'.
"Swag" is certainly a term for the proceeds of criminal activity, but
it's perfectly acceptable to use the term to describe non-criminal
activity if there is no intent to falsely portray the proceeds as
criminally obtained. Halloween candy can be described as "swag",
"loot" or "booty" just as you can say "The little buggers held me up
for a fistful of candy" without meaning "buggers" in that other sense
or "held me up" in the sense of an actual robbery.
More recently, "swag", or, for some reason, "shwag", has come to refer
to the free loot given to attendees at award ceremonies in the
entertainment world and, by extension, at trade shows and the like.
Tony Cooper
2006-10-27 19:10:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 27 Oct 2006 14:33:42 -0400, Harlan Messinger
Post by Harlan Messinger
Post by Tony Cooper
On 27 Oct 2006 10:15:36 -0700, "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by LFS
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Eric Schwartz
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Eric Schwartz
"Swag" also refers to freebies given to convention attendees by
vendors or sponsors of the convention.
And, this time of the year in the US, a term to describe what the
children bring home in their trick-or-treat bags.
Hrm, I don't think we ever called it "swag" in eastern Tennessee
WIWAL. I'm trying to think of what we *did* call it, but offhand,
nothing leaps to mind. Probably "loot", or simply "candy".
It's _very_ recent in all but the criminal sense.
Not sure what you mean by very recent. OED cites examples of swag
meaning of bunches of flowers or fruit to the late 18th century (same
for the criminal sense) and the Australian swag to the 19th.
What have we been talking about? We have been talking about the
extension from 'proceeds of criminal activity' to 'free gift you get
for just showing up'.
"Swag" is certainly a term for the proceeds of criminal activity, but
it's perfectly acceptable to use the term to describe non-criminal
activity if there is no intent to falsely portray the proceeds as
criminally obtained. Halloween candy can be described as "swag",
"loot" or "booty" just as you can say "The little buggers held me up
for a fistful of candy" without meaning "buggers" in that other sense
or "held me up" in the sense of an actual robbery.
More recently, "swag", or, for some reason, "shwag", has come to refer
to the free loot given to attendees at award ceremonies in the
entertainment world and, by extension, at trade shows and the like.
I wouldn't know. My invitation to the Oscars must have been lost in
the mail. I did come home from a trade show with a goodie bag of two
ballpoint pens, a 3' tape measure, two koozies, and a letter opener.
I don't think the take met the minimum requirement for "swag" even
though one of the pens wrote in black, blue, and red.
--
Tony Cooper
Orlando, FL
Roland Hutchinson
2006-10-28 17:13:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 27 Oct 2006 14:33:42 -0400, Harlan Messinger
Post by Harlan Messinger
More recently, "swag", or, for some reason, "shwag", has come to refer
to the free loot given to attendees at award ceremonies in the
entertainment world and, by extension, at trade shows and the like.
I wouldn't know. My invitation to the Oscars must have been lost in
the mail. I did come home from a trade show with a goodie bag of two
ballpoint pens, a 3' tape measure, two koozies, and a letter opener.
I don't think the take met the minimum requirement for "swag" even
though one of the pens wrote in black, blue, and red.
Is it still swag if you have to enter a drawing at the trade show for a
chance to get it? (I'd say yes.)

If so, I've got you beat running away in the swag department: the IBM
ThinkPad that I'm typing this on is a souvenir of LinuxWorld New York 2001.
Pretty much Oscar-worthy swag, that.
--
Roland Hutchinson              Will play viola da gamba for food.

NB mail to my.spamtrap [at] verizon.net is heavily filtered to
remove spam.  If your message looks like spam I may not see it.
Eric Schwartz
2006-10-27 18:46:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Harlan Messinger
Post by Tony Cooper
On 27 Oct 2006 10:15:36 -0700, "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by LFS
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Eric Schwartz
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Eric Schwartz
"Swag" also refers to freebies given to convention attendees by
vendors or sponsors of the convention.
And, this time of the year in the US, a term to describe what the
children bring home in their trick-or-treat bags.
Hrm, I don't think we ever called it "swag" in eastern Tennessee
WIWAL. I'm trying to think of what we *did* call it, but offhand,
nothing leaps to mind. Probably "loot", or simply "candy".
It's _very_ recent in all but the criminal sense.
Not sure what you mean by very recent. OED cites examples of swag
meaning of bunches of flowers or fruit to the late 18th century (same
for the criminal sense) and the Australian swag to the 19th.
What have we been talking about? We have been talking about the
extension from 'proceeds of criminal activity' to 'free gift you get
for just showing up'.
"Swag" is certainly a term for the proceeds of criminal activity, but
it's perfectly acceptable to use the term to describe non-criminal
activity if there is no intent to falsely portray the proceeds as
criminally obtained. Halloween candy can be described as "swag",
"loot" or "booty" just as you can say "The little buggers held me up
for a fistful of candy" without meaning "buggers" in that other sense
or "held me up" in the sense of an actual robbery.
More recently, "swag", or, for some reason, "shwag", has come to refer
to the free loot given to attendees at award ceremonies in the
entertainment world and, by extension, at trade shows and the like.
Which is what Tony and I said, lo these many quoted posts above.

-=Eric, who would ordinarily snip them if he weren't proving a point
Eric Schwartz
2006-10-27 19:04:03 UTC
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Post by Eric Schwartz
Which is what Tony and I said, lo these many quoted posts above.
Oops, my mistake, it was Peter and I. Sorry 'bout that.

-=Eric
Peter T. Daniels
2006-10-27 21:40:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Eric Schwartz
Post by Eric Schwartz
Which is what Tony and I said, lo these many quoted posts above.
Oops, my mistake, it was Peter and I. Sorry 'bout that.
My point, which Tony seems to have missed, is that it's a _recent_
semantic development.
Tony Cooper
2006-10-27 22:00:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 27 Oct 2006 14:40:56 -0700, "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Eric Schwartz
Post by Eric Schwartz
Which is what Tony and I said, lo these many quoted posts above.
Oops, my mistake, it was Peter and I. Sorry 'bout that.
My point, which Tony seems to have missed, is that it's a _recent_
semantic development.
Well, yeah, I suppose I did. Now that I've re-read:

"Hrm, I don't think we ever called it "swag" in eastern Tennessee
"WIWAL. I'm trying to think of what we *did* call it, but offhand,
"nothing leaps to mind. Probably "loot", or simply "candy".

"It's _very_ recent in all but the criminal sense."

I see that you made that point. The only thing left to know is
"Why?". Why did you make the point? Of what importance is the point?
Does it solve something? Make something clear that was not clear
before? Contribute to the understanding of something?

What's "_very_ recent", by the way? Tuesday? October, 1998? Did the
introduction of use coincide with something that makes the connection
_very_ relevant? Tet? Something to do with "Happy Days"?

It must be important since it's the subject of a "point", but damned
if I can figure out why it's important.
--
Tony Cooper
Orlando, FL
Peter T. Daniels
2006-10-27 22:12:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On 27 Oct 2006 14:40:56 -0700, "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Eric Schwartz
Post by Eric Schwartz
Which is what Tony and I said, lo these many quoted posts above.
Oops, my mistake, it was Peter and I. Sorry 'bout that.
My point, which Tony seems to have missed, is that it's a _recent_
semantic development.
"Hrm, I don't think we ever called it "swag" in eastern Tennessee
"WIWAL. I'm trying to think of what we *did* call it, but offhand,
"nothing leaps to mind. Probably "loot", or simply "candy".
"It's _very_ recent in all but the criminal sense."
I see that you made that point. The only thing left to know is
"Why?". Why did you make the point? Of what importance is the point?
Does it solve something? Make something clear that was not clear
before? Contribute to the understanding of something?
What's "_very_ recent", by the way? Tuesday? October, 1998? Did the
introduction of use coincide with something that makes the connection
_very_ relevant? Tet? Something to do with "Happy Days"?
It must be important since it's the subject of a "point", but damned
if I can figure out why it's important.
A way to figure it out would be to read the last few messages above the
one you quoted.

October 1998 is a possibility; I'd have put it as "within the last ten
years." I was not a "Happy Days" watcher, so whatever triggered that
particular synapse is irrelevant.
Roland Hutchinson
2006-10-28 02:45:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by LFS
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Eric Schwartz
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Eric Schwartz
"Swag" also refers to freebies given to convention attendees by
vendors or sponsors of the convention.
And, this time of the year in the US, a term to describe what the
children bring home in their trick-or-treat bags.
Hrm, I don't think we ever called it "swag" in eastern Tennessee
WIWAL. I'm trying to think of what we *did* call it, but offhand,
nothing leaps to mind. Probably "loot", or simply "candy".
It's _very_ recent in all but the criminal sense.
Not sure what you mean by very recent. OED cites examples of swag
meaning of bunches of flowers or fruit to the late 18th century (same
for the criminal sense) and the Australian swag to the 19th.
What have we been talking about? We have been talking about the
extension from 'proceeds of criminal activity' to 'free gift you get
for just showing up'.
What does that have to do with either bunches of flowers or fruit, or
the Australian swag?
In centuries past, perhaps before the invention of the getaway car,
criminals -- burglers in particular -- are portraied as carrying
misappropriated tangible personal property in a bundle or bag or some sort.
Could this be a connection?
--
Roland Hutchinson              Will play viola da gamba for food.

NB mail to my.spamtrap [at] verizon.net is heavily filtered to
remove spam.  If your message looks like spam I may not see it.
R H Draney
2006-10-27 20:31:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Eric Schwartz
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Eric Schwartz
"Swag" also refers to freebies given to convention attendees by
vendors or sponsors of the convention.
And, this time of the year in the US, a term to describe what the
children bring home in their trick-or-treat bags.
Hrm, I don't think we ever called it "swag" in eastern Tennessee
WIWAL. I'm trying to think of what we *did* call it, but offhand,
nothing leaps to mind. Probably "loot", or simply "candy".
I got a rock.

....r
--
"Keep your eye on the Bishop. I want to know when
he makes his move", said the Inspector, obliquely.
Herman Rubin
2006-10-30 16:57:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by R H Draney
Post by Eric Schwartz
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Eric Schwartz
"Swag" also refers to freebies given to convention attendees by
vendors or sponsors of the convention.
And, this time of the year in the US, a term to describe what the
children bring home in their trick-or-treat bags.
Hrm, I don't think we ever called it "swag" in eastern Tennessee
WIWAL. I'm trying to think of what we *did* call it, but offhand,
nothing leaps to mind. Probably "loot", or simply "candy".
I got a rock.
Another word for it is "bindle". Along with this goes
another word for the one who steals another's bindle;
he is a "bindlestiff".
--
This address is for information only. I do not claim that these views
are those of the Statistics Department or of Purdue University.
Herman Rubin, Department of Statistics, Purdue University
***@stat.purdue.edu Phone: (765)494-6054 FAX: (765)494-0558
benlizross
2006-10-30 20:55:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Herman Rubin
Post by R H Draney
Post by Eric Schwartz
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Eric Schwartz
"Swag" also refers to freebies given to convention attendees by
vendors or sponsors of the convention.
And, this time of the year in the US, a term to describe what the
children bring home in their trick-or-treat bags.
Hrm, I don't think we ever called it "swag" in eastern Tennessee
WIWAL. I'm trying to think of what we *did* call it, but offhand,
nothing leaps to mind. Probably "loot", or simply "candy".
I got a rock.
Another word for it is "bindle". Along with this goes
another word for the one who steals another's bindle;
he is a "bindlestiff".
I find no evidence of such a meaning. You may be reading it in from the
current use of "stiff" as a verb to mean "cheat, swindle". In fact the
"stiff" in that compound just means "person". (The term "working stiff"
meaning "ordinary working guy" used to be quite common.) So
"bindlestiff" just meant a hobo, not a thief.

Ross Clark
Jim Heckman
2006-10-30 02:59:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Eric Schwartz
Post by Peter T. Daniels
In the US "swag" used to be the fruits of a robbery, and these days
mostly refers to the freebies or "gift bags" that are given to
celebrities who attend an event, and by further extension, any sort of
esteemable giveaways (when Oprah gave a car to everyone in her audience
that day, that was swag, too).
"Swag" also refers to freebies given to convention attendees by
vendors or sponsors of the convention.
With the folk etymology "Stuff We All Get".
--
Jim Heckman
Peter T. Daniels
2006-10-30 04:25:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jim Heckman
Post by Eric Schwartz
Post by Peter T. Daniels
In the US "swag" used to be the fruits of a robbery, and these days
mostly refers to the freebies or "gift bags" that are given to
celebrities who attend an event, and by further extension, any sort of
esteemable giveaways (when Oprah gave a car to everyone in her audience
that day, that was swag, too).
"Swag" also refers to freebies given to convention attendees by
vendors or sponsors of the convention.
With the folk etymology "Stuff We All Get".
Got one for the phonotactics-violating "shwag"?
CDB
2006-10-30 13:49:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[...]
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jim Heckman
Post by Eric Schwartz
"Swag" also refers to freebies given to convention attendees by
vendors or sponsors of the convention.
With the folk etymology "Stuff We All Get".
Got one for the phonotactics-violating "shwag"?
Sure as shootin'.
Mike Lyle
2006-11-04 22:32:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jim Heckman
Post by Eric Schwartz
Post by Peter T. Daniels
In the US "swag" used to be the fruits of a robbery, and these days
mostly refers to the freebies or "gift bags" that are given to
celebrities who attend an event, and by further extension, any sort of
esteemable giveaways (when Oprah gave a car to everyone in her audience
that day, that was swag, too).
"Swag" also refers to freebies given to convention attendees by
vendors or sponsors of the convention.
With the folk etymology "Stuff We All Get".
Got one for the phonotactics-violating "shwag"?
No, but I suppose it could be loosely related to the perhaps recent BrE
habit of saying things like "shtreet" for "street" -- I say "perhaps
recent" because things have a habit of turning out to be less recent
than one thought. Non-criminal "swag", for example: it seems, from
Partridge _Hist. Sl._, to have been originally neutral, and perhaps a
reference to the bag in which the stuff was carried. I remember that
domestic draperies are sometimes arranged in "swags": I believe there's
a technical difference between a swag and a flounce or something. The
criminal implication seems to have become dominant, but not exclusive:
even outside the wonderful world of soft furnishings, late 19-C showmen
referred to prizes they offered as "swag" (Partridge).

IIUC, the little goodie-bags children now have to be given as a reward
for going to somebody's party seem often to be called "swag-bags" in
BrE. That matches the US Hallowe'en use somebody mentioned. I fancy
that as young adults in the '60s we sometimes referred to presents
brought back from holidays as "loot", though not AFAIR "swag".
--
Mike.
r***@yahoo.com
2006-11-05 20:41:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Gamma
Post by Mike Lyle
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What is the stick called that a vagrant ties the red & white polka dot
handkerchief to?
Good question. But I'm afraid the stick is just a stick, and the
handkerchief/kerchief/bandana/piece of cloth has no special name,
either.
I think this is what Australians in particular call a "swag". Maybe not
so much the stick but the belongings anyway.
In the US "swag" used to be the fruits of a robbery,
What is/was a "highwayman" called in the US?
Post by Peter T. Daniels
and these days
mostly refers to the freebies or "gift bags" that are given to
celebrities who attend an event, and by further extension, any sort of
esteemable giveaways (when Oprah gave a car to everyone in her audience
that day, that was swag, too).
Peter T. Daniels
2006-11-05 22:53:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by r***@yahoo.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Gamma
Post by Mike Lyle
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What is the stick called that a vagrant ties the red & white polka dot
handkerchief to?
Good question. But I'm afraid the stick is just a stick, and the
handkerchief/kerchief/bandana/piece of cloth has no special name,
either.
I think this is what Australians in particular call a "swag". Maybe not
so much the stick but the belongings anyway.
In the US "swag" used to be the fruits of a robbery,
What is/was a "highwayman" called in the US?
I'm not sure we ever had such an institution. A stagecoach might be
held up by a "bandit," so maybe that's an equivalent. These days we
have "carjackers."
Post by r***@yahoo.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
and these days
mostly refers to the freebies or "gift bags" that are given to
celebrities who attend an event, and by further extension, any sort of
esteemable giveaways (when Oprah gave a car to everyone in her audience
that day, that was swag, too).
Pat Durkin
2006-11-06 03:02:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by r***@yahoo.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Gamma
Post by Mike Lyle
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What is the stick called that a vagrant ties the red & white polka dot
handkerchief to?
Good question. But I'm afraid the stick is just a stick, and the
handkerchief/kerchief/bandana/piece of cloth has no special name,
either.
I think this is what Australians in particular call a "swag". Maybe not
so much the stick but the belongings anyway.
In the US "swag" used to be the fruits of a robbery,
What is/was a "highwayman" called in the US?
Well, we have had "highway robbery", of course, but it is a rather trite
(though not trivial) complaint, primarily made about political
corruption. Enron's executives, engaged in it at an astronomical level.
I mean, politicians are pikers, compared to that.

The term "highwayman" may have been used in the early days, of course.

But brigands seem to me to have had their specialties during the era in
which we romanticized the trade: bank robbers, stage coach robbers,
train robbers. Then there were rustlers and horse thieves.

Bandits and outlaws were other terms, before we started calling people
"stick-up artists" and "hold-up artists".
John Holmes
2006-10-27 10:13:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gamma
Post by Mike Lyle
Good question. But I'm afraid the stick is just a stick, and the
handkerchief/kerchief/bandana/piece of cloth has no special name,
either.
I think this is what Australians in particular call a "swag". Maybe not
so much the stick but the belongings anyway.
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swag>
Not quite: a swag is very definitely a bedroll as described there. They
are much bulkier, as you can see from the thing slung diagonally across
this bloke's back:
Loading Image...
There might be some clothes and other small belongings inside it, but
bulkier things like a billy or frying pan are usually carried separately
as in the picture.

--
Regards
John
for mail: my initials plus a u e
at tpg dot com dot au
r***@yahoo.com
2006-11-05 20:43:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Holmes
Post by Gamma
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swag>
Not quite: a swag is very definitely a bedroll as described there. They
are much bulkier, as you can see from the thing slung diagonally across
http://www.bushwalking.org.au/FAQ/images/SwagFAQ.jpg
There might be some clothes and other small belongings inside it, but
bulkier things like a billy or frying pan are usually carried separately
as in the picture.
"Take your bed and wok":-)
Mike Wright
2006-11-05 21:54:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by r***@yahoo.com
Post by John Holmes
Post by Gamma
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swag>
Not quite: a swag is very definitely a bedroll as described there. They
are much bulkier, as you can see from the thing slung diagonally across
http://www.bushwalking.org.au/FAQ/images/SwagFAQ.jpg
There might be some clothes and other small belongings inside it, but
bulkier things like a billy or frying pan are usually carried separately
as in the picture.
"Take your bed and wok":-)
It's all clear to me now...
--
Mike Wright
http://www.raccoonbend.com
Chris Tsao
2006-11-08 03:10:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Holmes
Post by Gamma
Post by Mike Lyle
Good question. But I'm afraid the stick is just a stick, and the
handkerchief/kerchief/bandana/piece of cloth has no special name,
either.
I think this is what Australians in particular call a "swag". Maybe not
so much the stick but the belongings anyway.
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swag>
Not quite: a swag is very definitely a bedroll as described there. They
are much bulkier, as you can see from the thing slung diagonally across
http://www.bushwalking.org.au/FAQ/images/SwagFAQ.jpg
There might be some clothes and other small belongings inside it, but
bulkier things like a billy or frying pan are usually carried separately
as in the picture.
I coincidentally learned the word bedroll yestereven for the first time
in my life reading Lonesome Dove. They carried it around on their
horses. I think I know what it looks like without having to verify it
in Google Images. It's sort of like a sushi role or a tootsie role, I'd
say.
Peter T. Daniels
2006-11-08 13:40:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris Tsao
Post by John Holmes
Post by Gamma
Post by Mike Lyle
Good question. But I'm afraid the stick is just a stick, and the
handkerchief/kerchief/bandana/piece of cloth has no special name,
either.
I think this is what Australians in particular call a "swag". Maybe not
so much the stick but the belongings anyway.
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swag>
Not quite: a swag is very definitely a bedroll as described there. They
are much bulkier, as you can see from the thing slung diagonally across
http://www.bushwalking.org.au/FAQ/images/SwagFAQ.jpg
There might be some clothes and other small belongings inside it, but
bulkier things like a billy or frying pan are usually carried separately
as in the picture.
I coincidentally learned the word bedroll yestereven for the first time
in my life reading Lonesome Dove. They carried it around on their
horses. I think I know what it looks like without having to verify it
in Google Images. It's sort of like a sushi role or a tootsie role, I'd
say.
Having learned the word "bedroll," why would you spell "sushi roll" and
"Tootsie Roll" that way?
Mark Wallace
2006-11-08 18:12:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Chris Tsao
Post by John Holmes
Post by Gamma
Post by Mike Lyle
Good question. But I'm afraid the stick is just a stick, and the
handkerchief/kerchief/bandana/piece of cloth has no special name,
either.
I think this is what Australians in particular call a "swag". Maybe not
so much the stick but the belongings anyway.
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swag>
Not quite: a swag is very definitely a bedroll as described there. They
are much bulkier, as you can see from the thing slung diagonally across
http://www.bushwalking.org.au/FAQ/images/SwagFAQ.jpg
There might be some clothes and other small belongings inside it, but
bulkier things like a billy or frying pan are usually carried separately
as in the picture.
I coincidentally learned the word bedroll yestereven for the first time
in my life reading Lonesome Dove. They carried it around on their
horses. I think I know what it looks like without having to verify it
in Google Images. It's sort of like a sushi role or a tootsie role, I'd
say.
Having learned the word "bedroll," why would you spell "sushi roll" and
"Tootsie Roll" that way?
An unwritten rule of this group is that we do not question other
participants' sexual preferences.
Snidely
2006-11-08 21:42:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[...]
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Chris Tsao
I coincidentally learned the word bedroll yestereven for the first time
in my life reading Lonesome Dove. They carried it around on their
horses. I think I know what it looks like without having to verify it
in Google Images. It's sort of like a sushi role or a tootsie role, I'd
say.
Having learned the word "bedroll," why would you spell "sushi roll" and
"Tootsie Roll" that way?
Shirley he was talking about the role that toes play in squishing the
sushi into the blankets.

/dps
Peter T. Daniels
2006-11-08 23:28:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Snidely
[...]
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Chris Tsao
I coincidentally learned the word bedroll yestereven for the first time
in my life reading Lonesome Dove. They carried it around on their
horses. I think I know what it looks like without having to verify it
in Google Images. It's sort of like a sushi role or a tootsie role, I'd
say.
Having learned the word "bedroll," why would you spell "sushi roll" and
"Tootsie Roll" that way?
Shirley he was talking about the role that toes play in squishing the
sushi into the blankets.
Dustin Hoffman made sushi? And don't call me Shirley.
Chris Tsao
2006-11-09 19:56:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Chris Tsao
Post by John Holmes
Post by Gamma
Post by Mike Lyle
Good question. But I'm afraid the stick is just a stick, and the
handkerchief/kerchief/bandana/piece of cloth has no special name,
either.
I think this is what Australians in particular call a "swag". Maybe not
so much the stick but the belongings anyway.
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swag>
Not quite: a swag is very definitely a bedroll as described there. They
are much bulkier, as you can see from the thing slung diagonally across
http://www.bushwalking.org.au/FAQ/images/SwagFAQ.jpg
There might be some clothes and other small belongings inside it, but
bulkier things like a billy or frying pan are usually carried separately
as in the picture.
I coincidentally learned the word bedroll yestereven for the first time
in my life reading Lonesome Dove. They carried it around on their
horses. I think I know what it looks like without having to verify it
in Google Images. It's sort of like a sushi role or a tootsie role, I'd
say.
Having learned the word "bedroll," why would you spell "sushi roll" and
"Tootsie Roll" that way?
I thought it would be more likely that there wouldn't be a space or a
hyphen and I was too lazy to think about whether or not I should
capitilize tootsie and roll.
Peter T. Daniels
2006-11-09 21:32:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris Tsao
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Chris Tsao
Post by John Holmes
Post by Gamma
Post by Mike Lyle
Good question. But I'm afraid the stick is just a stick, and the
handkerchief/kerchief/bandana/piece of cloth has no special name,
either.
I think this is what Australians in particular call a "swag". Maybe not
so much the stick but the belongings anyway.
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swag>
Not quite: a swag is very definitely a bedroll as described there. They
are much bulkier, as you can see from the thing slung diagonally across
http://www.bushwalking.org.au/FAQ/images/SwagFAQ.jpg
There might be some clothes and other small belongings inside it, but
bulkier things like a billy or frying pan are usually carried separately
as in the picture.
I coincidentally learned the word bedroll yestereven for the first time
in my life reading Lonesome Dove. They carried it around on their
horses. I think I know what it looks like without having to verify it
in Google Images. It's sort of like a sushi role or a tootsie role, I'd
say.
Having learned the word "bedroll," why would you spell "sushi roll" and
"Tootsie Roll" that way?
I thought it would be more likely that there wouldn't be a space or a
hyphen and I was too lazy to think about whether or not I should
capitilize tootsie and roll.
You wrote "sushi role" and Tootsie Role," thus spawning a spate of
unfortunate puns.
Chris Tsao
2006-11-09 21:35:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Chris Tsao
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Chris Tsao
Post by John Holmes
Post by Gamma
Post by Mike Lyle
Good question. But I'm afraid the stick is just a stick, and the
handkerchief/kerchief/bandana/piece of cloth has no special name,
either.
I think this is what Australians in particular call a "swag". Maybe not
so much the stick but the belongings anyway.
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swag>
Not quite: a swag is very definitely a bedroll as described there. They
are much bulkier, as you can see from the thing slung diagonally across
http://www.bushwalking.org.au/FAQ/images/SwagFAQ.jpg
There might be some clothes and other small belongings inside it, but
bulkier things like a billy or frying pan are usually carried separately
as in the picture.
I coincidentally learned the word bedroll yestereven for the first time
in my life reading Lonesome Dove. They carried it around on their
horses. I think I know what it looks like without having to verify it
in Google Images. It's sort of like a sushi role or a tootsie role, I'd
say.
Having learned the word "bedroll," why would you spell "sushi roll" and
"Tootsie Roll" that way?
I thought it would be more likely that there wouldn't be a space or a
hyphen and I was too lazy to think about whether or not I should
capitilize tootsie and roll.
You wrote "sushi role" and Tootsie Role," thus spawning a spate of
unfortunate puns.
Oh role and not roll.
Mike Lyle
2006-11-09 19:31:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris Tsao
Post by John Holmes
Post by Gamma
Post by Mike Lyle
Good question. But I'm afraid the stick is just a stick, and the
handkerchief/kerchief/bandana/piece of cloth has no special name,
either.
I think this is what Australians in particular call a "swag". Maybe not
so much the stick but the belongings anyway.
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swag>
Not quite: a swag is very definitely a bedroll as described there. They
are much bulkier, as you can see from the thing slung diagonally across
http://www.bushwalking.org.au/FAQ/images/SwagFAQ.jpg
There might be some clothes and other small belongings inside it, but
bulkier things like a billy or frying pan are usually carried separately
as in the picture.
I coincidentally learned the word bedroll yestereven for the first time
in my life reading Lonesome Dove. They carried it around on their
horses. I think I know what it looks like without having to verify it
in Google Images. It's sort of like a sushi role or a tootsie role, I'd
say.
Need to be careful with this, and judge from context what's being
referred to. Among the non-swaggie classes, a "bedroll" would have been
a purpose-made heavy canvas cover, sometimes with a mackintosh lining,
and fastened with straps, in which one's bedding was, indeed, rolled
for travel. It was an indispensable possession in various outposts of
empire and elsewhere back then.
--
Mike.
Chris Tsao
2006-11-09 19:45:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike Lyle
Post by Chris Tsao
Post by John Holmes
Post by Gamma
Post by Mike Lyle
Good question. But I'm afraid the stick is just a stick, and the
handkerchief/kerchief/bandana/piece of cloth has no special name,
either.
I think this is what Australians in particular call a "swag". Maybe not
so much the stick but the belongings anyway.
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swag>
Not quite: a swag is very definitely a bedroll as described there. They
are much bulkier, as you can see from the thing slung diagonally across
http://www.bushwalking.org.au/FAQ/images/SwagFAQ.jpg
There might be some clothes and other small belongings inside it, but
bulkier things like a billy or frying pan are usually carried separately
as in the picture.
I coincidentally learned the word bedroll yestereven for the first time
in my life reading Lonesome Dove. They carried it around on their
horses. I think I know what it looks like without having to verify it
in Google Images. It's sort of like a sushi role or a tootsie role, I'd
say.
Need to be careful with this, and judge from context what's being
referred to. Among the non-swaggie classes, a "bedroll" would have been
a purpose-made heavy canvas cover, sometimes with a mackintosh lining,
and fastened with straps, in which one's bedding was, indeed, rolled
for travel. It was an indispensable possession in various outposts of
empire and elsewhere back then.
--
Mike.
I'm pretty sure I read the word oilroll in Lonesome Dove yesterday.
Something about how Lorena backed people's stuff (like clothing) in an
oilroll. I'll research the word now and if I can't find it, I'll check
the book for the correct word.
Chris Tsao
2006-11-09 19:46:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris Tsao
I'm pretty sure I read the word oilroll in Lonesome Dove yesterday.
Something about how Lorena backed people's stuff (like clothing) in an
oilroll. I'll research the word now and if I can't find it, I'll check
the book for the correct word.
It's probably toilet paper and paper towels.

http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&q=oilroll
Pat Durkin
2006-11-09 21:06:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris Tsao
Post by Mike Lyle
Post by Chris Tsao
Post by John Holmes
Post by Odysseus
In article
Post by Mike Lyle
Good question. But I'm afraid the stick is just a stick, and the
handkerchief/kerchief/bandana/piece of cloth has no special name,
either.
I think this is what Australians in particular call a "swag".
Maybe
not
so much the stick but the belongings anyway.
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swag>
Not quite: a swag is very definitely a bedroll as described there. They
are much bulkier, as you can see from the thing slung diagonally across
http://www.bushwalking.org.au/FAQ/images/SwagFAQ.jpg
There might be some clothes and other small belongings inside it, but
bulkier things like a billy or frying pan are usually carried separately
as in the picture.
I coincidentally learned the word bedroll yestereven for the first time
in my life reading Lonesome Dove. They carried it around on their
horses. I think I know what it looks like without having to verify it
in Google Images. It's sort of like a sushi role or a tootsie role, I'd
say.
Need to be careful with this, and judge from context what's being
referred to. Among the non-swaggie classes, a "bedroll" would have been
a purpose-made heavy canvas cover, sometimes with a mackintosh lining,
and fastened with straps, in which one's bedding was, indeed, rolled
for travel. It was an indispensable possession in various outposts of
empire and elsewhere back then.
I'm pretty sure I read the word oilroll in Lonesome Dove yesterday.
Something about how Lorena backed people's stuff (like clothing) in an
oilroll. I'll research the word now and if I can't find it, I'll check
the book for the correct word.
I am not sure about this, but I think that the "oilroll" (a new term for
me) was an oilcloth, which was used as a tarpaulin for a leanto, a
slicker (over the head and shoulders in a rainstorm), the base for the
bedding on the ground, and to protect and contain bedding, leathers, and
other personal items for the horseman (or sailor, etc). It was usually
made of a kind of duck or sailcloth embedded with oil (later rubberized)
to impede the entry of damp or rain, etc.

http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1E1-oilcloth.html

Heavier materials could be used to make a floor or wall covering.

Even after the beginning of the vinyl age, with decorator prints, the
everyday tablecloth was still called "oilcloth".
Chris Tsao
2006-11-09 21:23:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pat Durkin
Post by Chris Tsao
Post by Mike Lyle
Post by Chris Tsao
Post by John Holmes
Post by Odysseus
In article
Post by Mike Lyle
Good question. But I'm afraid the stick is just a stick, and the
handkerchief/kerchief/bandana/piece of cloth has no special name,
either.
I think this is what Australians in particular call a "swag".
Maybe
not
so much the stick but the belongings anyway.
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swag>
Not quite: a swag is very definitely a bedroll as described there. They
are much bulkier, as you can see from the thing slung diagonally across
http://www.bushwalking.org.au/FAQ/images/SwagFAQ.jpg
There might be some clothes and other small belongings inside it, but
bulkier things like a billy or frying pan are usually carried separately
as in the picture.
I coincidentally learned the word bedroll yestereven for the first time
in my life reading Lonesome Dove. They carried it around on their
horses. I think I know what it looks like without having to verify it
in Google Images. It's sort of like a sushi role or a tootsie role, I'd
say.
Need to be careful with this, and judge from context what's being
referred to. Among the non-swaggie classes, a "bedroll" would have been
a purpose-made heavy canvas cover, sometimes with a mackintosh lining,
and fastened with straps, in which one's bedding was, indeed, rolled
for travel. It was an indispensable possession in various outposts of
empire and elsewhere back then.
I'm pretty sure I read the word oilroll in Lonesome Dove yesterday.
Something about how Lorena backed people's stuff (like clothing) in an
oilroll. I'll research the word now and if I can't find it, I'll check
the book for the correct word.
I am not sure about this, but I think that the "oilroll" (a new term for
me) was an oilcloth, which was used as a tarpaulin for a leanto, a
slicker (over the head and shoulders in a rainstorm), the base for the
bedding on the ground, and to protect and contain bedding, leathers, and
other personal items for the horseman (or sailor, etc). It was usually
made of a kind of duck or sailcloth embedded with oil (later rubberized)
to impede the entry of damp or rain, etc.
http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1E1-oilcloth.html
Heavier materials could be used to make a floor or wall covering.
Even after the beginning of the vinyl age, with decorator prints, the
everyday tablecloth was still called "oilcloth".
That's it. It was Dish Boggett who packed extra clothes in the
aforemention oilcloth, so he therefore had dry clothes (on page 290).
The group camped out to ride out a bad storm, so everybody is packing
up now, so I confused who is packing what.
Mike Lyle
2006-11-09 21:37:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[...]
Post by Pat Durkin
Post by Chris Tsao
Post by Mike Lyle
Need to be careful with this, and judge from context what's being
referred to. Among the non-swaggie classes, a "bedroll" would have been
a purpose-made heavy canvas cover, sometimes with a mackintosh lining,
and fastened with straps, in which one's bedding was, indeed, rolled
for travel. It was an indispensable possession in various outposts of
empire and elsewhere back then.
I'm pretty sure I read the word oilroll in Lonesome Dove yesterday.
Something about how Lorena backed people's stuff (like clothing) in an
oilroll. I'll research the word now and if I can't find it, I'll check
the book for the correct word.
I am not sure about this, but I think that the "oilroll" (a new term for
me) was an oilcloth, which was used as a tarpaulin for a leanto, a
slicker (over the head and shoulders in a rainstorm), the base for the
bedding on the ground, and to protect and contain bedding, leathers, and
other personal items for the horseman (or sailor, etc). It was usually
made of a kind of duck or sailcloth embedded with oil (later rubberized)
to impede the entry of damp or rain, etc.
"Oilskin" in these parts. The cloth was treated with boiled linseed
oil, which dries out. Oilskin smocks and overtrousers were standard
gear at sea. Barbour make, or made, waxed smocks in a yellowish colour
in imitation.
Post by Pat Durkin
http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1E1-oilcloth.html
Heavier materials could be used to make a floor or wall covering.
Even after the beginning of the vinyl age, with decorator prints, the
everyday tablecloth was still called "oilcloth".
I remember that horrible but practical stuff: always seemed to have
flowers printed on it. A sort of plastic film on one side, and cloth on
the reverse. It wasn't the same as oilskin, but I suppose its ancestor
was: certainly everybody called it "oilcloth".
--
Mike.
Charles Riggs
2006-11-15 12:40:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pat Durkin
Post by Chris Tsao
Post by Mike Lyle
Post by Chris Tsao
Post by John Holmes
Post by Odysseus
In article
Post by Mike Lyle
Good question. But I'm afraid the stick is just a stick, and the
handkerchief/kerchief/bandana/piece of cloth has no special name,
either.
I think this is what Australians in particular call a "swag".
Maybe
not
so much the stick but the belongings anyway.
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swag>
Not quite: a swag is very definitely a bedroll as described there. They
are much bulkier, as you can see from the thing slung diagonally across
http://www.bushwalking.org.au/FAQ/images/SwagFAQ.jpg
There might be some clothes and other small belongings inside it, but
bulkier things like a billy or frying pan are usually carried separately
as in the picture.
I coincidentally learned the word bedroll yestereven for the first time
in my life reading Lonesome Dove. They carried it around on their
horses. I think I know what it looks like without having to verify it
in Google Images. It's sort of like a sushi role or a tootsie role, I'd
say.
Need to be careful with this, and judge from context what's being
referred to. Among the non-swaggie classes, a "bedroll" would have been
a purpose-made heavy canvas cover, sometimes with a mackintosh lining,
and fastened with straps, in which one's bedding was, indeed, rolled
for travel. It was an indispensable possession in various outposts of
empire and elsewhere back then.
I'm pretty sure I read the word oilroll in Lonesome Dove yesterday.
Something about how Lorena backed people's stuff (like clothing) in an
oilroll. I'll research the word now and if I can't find it, I'll check
the book for the correct word.
I am not sure about this, but I think that the "oilroll" (a new term for
me) was an oilcloth, which was used as a tarpaulin for a leanto, a
slicker (over the head and shoulders in a rainstorm), the base for the
bedding on the ground, and to protect and contain bedding, leathers, and
other personal items for the horseman (or sailor, etc). It was usually
made of a kind of duck or sailcloth embedded with oil (later rubberized)
to impede the entry of damp or rain, etc.
http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1E1-oilcloth.html
Heavier materials could be used to make a floor or wall covering.
Even after the beginning of the vinyl age, with decorator prints, the
everyday tablecloth was still called "oilcloth".
FWIW, I remember that well.
--
Charles Riggs
Pat Durkin
2006-11-15 14:12:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Charles Riggs
Post by Pat Durkin
I am not sure about this, but I think that the "oilroll" (a new term for
me) was an oilcloth, which was used as a tarpaulin for a leanto, a
slicker (over the head and shoulders in a rainstorm), the base for the
bedding on the ground, and to protect and contain bedding, leathers, and
other personal items for the horseman (or sailor, etc). It was usually
made of a kind of duck or sailcloth embedded with oil (later
rubberized)
to impede the entry of damp or rain, etc.
http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1E1-oilcloth.html
Heavier materials could be used to make a floor or wall covering.
Even after the beginning of the vinyl age, with decorator prints, the
everyday tablecloth was still called "oilcloth".
FWIW, I remember that well.
I looked in my pantry. Don't have the vinyl-covered stuff any longer.
Just a plastic one for just-in-case.
o***@gmail.com
2018-09-19 19:15:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Yep, a bindle. Saw it earlier... thanks so much! I'm making a card game and I really needed to know this because it was one of the objects in the game.
It also rhymes with pen.
Oliver
Helmut Richter
2018-09-19 19:32:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by o***@gmail.com
Yep, a bindle. Saw it earlier... thanks so much! I'm making a card game and I really needed to know this because it was one of the objects in the game.
It also rhymes with pen.
What language? English? "bindle" does not show up in dictionaries,
and I do not find it rhymes with pen.

The word I know is "swag" but that may be restricted to Oz.

What is it called in Britain or the US?
--
Helmut Richter
o***@gmail.com
2018-09-19 19:42:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Yeah, I meant frindle. It was a terrible joke.
You know, I just saw this post because I googled what it was called and found it here... I'm not totally sure.
"A bindle is the bag, sack, or carrying device stereotypically used by the American sub-culture of hobos. A bindlestiff was another name for a hobo who carried a bindle." That's from Wikipedia, which I also found it on, but you are correct, I couldn't find it in any dictionaries... except for page 208 on the Random House Webster's Unabridged Dictionary at my house. Here's the link to the Wikipedia page if it's helpful: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bindle.
Is it English? I've no clue. I believe so, but you probably shouldn't trust my opinions...
Oliver
Peter T. Daniels
2018-09-19 20:14:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by o***@gmail.com
Yeah, I meant frindle. It was a terrible joke.
You know, I just saw this post because I googled what it was called and found it here... I'm not totally sure.
"A bindle is the bag, sack, or carrying device stereotypically used by the American sub-culture of hobos. A bindlestiff was another name for a hobo who carried a bindle." That's from Wikipedia, which I also found it on, but you are correct, I couldn't find it in any dictionaries...
? It's a perfectly ordinary word, defined in the M-W 11th Collegiate as
'a bundle of clothing or bedding', attested since 1897; "perhaps alteration
of "bundle.""
Post by o***@gmail.com
except for page 208 on the Random House Webster's Unabridged Dictionary at my house. Here's the link to the Wikipedia page if it's helpful: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bindle.
Is it English? I've no clue. I believe so, but you probably shouldn't trust my opinions...
Helmut Richter
2018-09-19 21:35:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by o***@gmail.com
Yeah, I meant frindle. It was a terrible joke.
You know, I just saw this post because I googled what it was called and found it here... I'm not totally sure.
"A bindle is the bag, sack, or carrying device stereotypically used by the American sub-culture of hobos. A bindlestiff was another name for a hobo who carried a bindle." That's from Wikipedia, which I also found it on, but you are correct, I couldn't find it in any dictionaries...
? It's a perfectly ordinary word, defined in the M-W 11th Collegiate as
'a bundle of clothing or bedding', attested since 1897; "perhaps alteration
of "bundle.""
COD (around 1990) was the biggest not to contain "bindle".
--
Helmut Richter
Daud Deden
2018-09-30 17:29:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Helmut Richter
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by o***@gmail.com
Yeah, I meant frindle. It was a terrible joke.
You know, I just saw this post because I googled what it was called and found it here... I'm not totally sure.
"A bindle is the bag, sack, or carrying device stereotypically used by the American sub-culture of hobos. A bindlestiff was another name for a hobo who carried a bindle." That's from Wikipedia, which I also found it on, but you are correct, I couldn't find it in any dictionaries...
? It's a perfectly ordinary word, defined in the M-W 11th Collegiate as
'a bundle of clothing or bedding', attested since 1897; "perhaps alteration
of "bundle.""
COD (around 1990) was the biggest not to contain "bindle".
--
Helmut Richter
The bindle cloth/skin was a blanket or tarp, bedding, bet(h), ***@FG.
John Atkinson
2006-11-11 02:29:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike Lyle
Post by Chris Tsao
Post by John Holmes
Post by Gamma
Post by Mike Lyle
Good question. But I'm afraid the stick is just a stick, and the
handkerchief/kerchief/bandana/piece of cloth has no special name,
either.
I think this is what Australians in particular call a "swag".
Maybe
not
so much the stick but the belongings anyway.
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swag>
Not quite: a swag is very definitely a bedroll as described there. They
are much bulkier, as you can see from the thing slung diagonally across
http://www.bushwalking.org.au/FAQ/images/SwagFAQ.jpg
There might be some clothes and other small belongings inside it, but
bulkier things like a billy or frying pan are usually carried separately
as in the picture.
I coincidentally learned the word bedroll yestereven for the first time
in my life reading Lonesome Dove. They carried it around on their
horses. I think I know what it looks like without having to verify it
in Google Images. It's sort of like a sushi role or a tootsie role, I'd
say.
Need to be careful with this, and judge from context what's being
referred to. Among the non-swaggie classes, a "bedroll" would have been
a purpose-made heavy canvas cover, sometimes with a mackintosh lining,
and fastened with straps, in which one's bedding was, indeed, rolled
for travel.
That's an fairly good discription of what's called a "swag" among the
car-camping classes here in Oz

John.
John Savage
2006-11-05 03:03:54 UTC
Reply
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Post by Gamma
Post by Mike Lyle
Good question. But I'm afraid the stick is just a stick, and the
handkerchief/kerchief/bandana/piece of cloth has no special name,
either.
I think this is what Australians in particular call a "swag". Maybe not
so much the stick but the belongings anyway.
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swag>
Colloquially known as his 'matilda'; and the stick is not carried over the
shoulder, but carried like a walking stick so it's at the ready to dispatch
any snake that poses a danger. In hard times, the snake may become dinner.
--
John Savage (my news address is not valid for email)
Tony Cooper
2006-10-27 02:13:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike Lyle
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What is the stick called that a vagrant ties the red & white polka dot
handkerchief to?
I can google 'till the cows come home but I haven't found what that stick,
held over one shoulder, is actually called?
What about the little handkerchief that the same vagabond ties to the
stick?
What is that handkerchief called?
Do these two things they tote about have names?
Good question. But I'm afraid the stick is just a stick, and the
handkerchief/kerchief/bandana/piece of cloth has no special name,
either.
Bindle? a small bundle of items rolled up inside a blanket and
carried over the shoulder or on the back; a bedroll. Not a cloth on a
stick, but the word is associated with tramps.
--
Tony Cooper
Orlando, FL
UC
2006-10-26 20:47:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What is the stick called that a vagrant ties the red & white polka dot
handkerchief to?
I can google 'till the cows come home but I haven't found what that stick,
held over one shoulder, is actually called?
What about the little handkerchief that the same vagabond ties to the
stick?
What is that handkerchief called?
Do these two things they tote about have names?
Thanks,
Nancy
I think it's called a 'pike'.
UC
2006-10-26 20:52:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What is the stick called that a vagrant ties the red & white polka dot
handkerchief to?
I can google 'till the cows come home but I haven't found what that stick,
held over one shoulder, is actually called?
I think it's called a 'pike'.

Yup. See #3 below.
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What about the little handkerchief that the same vagabond ties to the
stick?
What is that handkerchief called?
Poke?
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
Do these two things they tote about have names?
Thanks,
Nancy
Main Entry:6pike
Pronunciation:*
Function:noun
Inflected Form:-s
Etymology:Middle French pique, from piquer to prick, pierce, nettle,
pique, from (assumed) Vulgar Latin piccare, from (assumed) piccus
woodpecker, from Latin picus * more at PIE

1 : a weapon consisting of a long wooden shaft with a pointed steel
head sometimes having a hook or pick on the side and used by the foot
soldier until superseded by the bayonet
2 obsolete : PIKEMAN
3 : the sharp-tipped staff on which a flag is carried *carried on a
pike 9 feet, 10 inches long including the spear tip W.F.Harris*

Also:

5 dialect England : one of various sharp-pointed tools or implements
(as a pitchfork) *the windrows are loaded on a wagon by hand with a
pike F.D.Smith & Barbara Wilcox*
A. Gwilliam
2006-10-26 22:07:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by UC
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What is the stick called that a vagrant ties the red & white polka
dot handkerchief to?
I can google 'till the cows come home but I haven't found what that
stick, held over one shoulder, is actually called?
I think it's called a 'pike'.
Yup. See #3 below.
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What about the little handkerchief that the same vagabond ties to
the stick?
What is that handkerchief called?
Poke?
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
Do these two things they tote about have names?
Main Entry:6pike
Pronunciation:*
Function:noun
Inflected Form:-s
Etymology:Middle French pique, from piquer to prick, pierce, nettle,
pique, from (assumed) Vulgar Latin piccare, from (assumed) piccus
woodpecker, from Latin picus * more at PIE
1 : a weapon consisting of a long wooden shaft with a pointed steel
head sometimes having a hook or pick on the side and used by the foot
soldier until superseded by the bayonet
2 obsolete : PIKEMAN
3 : the sharp-tipped staff on which a flag is carried *carried on a
pike 9 feet, 10 inches long including the spear tip W.F.Harris*
5 dialect England : one of various sharp-pointed tools or implements
(as a pitchfork) *the windrows are loaded on a wagon by hand with a
pike F.D.Smith & Barbara Wilcox*
This is incredible even for you. Your cited dictionary entry does not
at any point include the definition you claim it does!

It is also considered appropriate to state your source when quoting
material written by others. Especially when it's copyrighted.
--
A. Gwilliam
To e-mail me, replace "bottomless_pit" with "devnull"
UC
2006-10-26 22:14:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by A. Gwilliam
Post by UC
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What is the stick called that a vagrant ties the red & white polka
dot handkerchief to?
I can google 'till the cows come home but I haven't found what that
stick, held over one shoulder, is actually called?
I think it's called a 'pike'.
Yup. See #3 below.
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What about the little handkerchief that the same vagabond ties to
the stick?
What is that handkerchief called?
Poke?
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
Do these two things they tote about have names?
Main Entry:6pike
Pronunciation:*
Function:noun
Inflected Form:-s
Etymology:Middle French pique, from piquer to prick, pierce, nettle,
pique, from (assumed) Vulgar Latin piccare, from (assumed) piccus
woodpecker, from Latin picus * more at PIE
1 : a weapon consisting of a long wooden shaft with a pointed steel
head sometimes having a hook or pick on the side and used by the foot
soldier until superseded by the bayonet
2 obsolete : PIKEMAN
3 : the sharp-tipped staff on which a flag is carried *carried on a
pike 9 feet, 10 inches long including the spear tip W.F.Harris*
5 dialect England : one of various sharp-pointed tools or implements
(as a pitchfork) *the windrows are loaded on a wagon by hand with a
pike F.D.Smith & Barbara Wilcox*
This is incredible even for you. Your cited dictionary entry does not
at any point include the definition you claim it does!
Yes, #3 a sharp-tipped stick on which a flag is carried. I suppose the
'flag' could also be a bag without forcing the issue too far. I'm not
an expert, just trying to help.
Post by A. Gwilliam
It is also considered appropriate to state your source when quoting
material written by others. Especially when it's copyrighted.
--
A. Gwilliam
To e-mail me, replace "bottomless_pit" with "devnull"
Douglas G. Kilday
2006-10-27 03:47:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by UC
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What is the stick called that a vagrant ties the red & white polka dot
handkerchief to?
I can google 'till the cows come home but I haven't found what that stick,
held over one shoulder, is actually called?
I think it's called a 'pike'.
Yup. See #3 below.
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What about the little handkerchief that the same vagabond ties to the
stick?
What is that handkerchief called?
Poke?
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
Do these two things they tote about have names?
Thanks,
Nancy
Main Entry:6pike
Pronunciation:*
Function:noun
Inflected Form:-s
Etymology:Middle French pique, from piquer to prick, pierce, nettle,
pique, from (assumed) Vulgar Latin piccare, from (assumed) piccus
woodpecker, from Latin picus * more at PIE
A more plausible explanation of the Romance 'pike'-nouns was given by
G.-G. Nicholson in one of the early volumes of _Revue de Linguistique
Romaine_ (sorry I don't have the exact reference). N. postulated that
Latin <exspi:ca:re> 'to remove (grain) from the ear' became in Vulgar
Latin *expicare, whence *pica 'ear of grain' was extracted (in some
dialects *picus, and *picca where 'ear of grain' had been Lat. *spicca
var. of <spi:ca>), and generalized in the sense 'pointed object'. If
your woodpecker-etymology above is followed, each of the Romance lgs.
with some variant of this noun must have independently back-formed it
from the verb.
Post by UC
[...]
Brian M. Scott
2006-10-26 21:11:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 26 Oct 2006 20:39:55 GMT, Nancy Pi Squared
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What is the stick called that a vagrant ties the red &
white polka dot handkerchief to?
I can google 'till the cows come home but I haven't found
what that stick, held over one shoulder, is actually
called?
What about the little handkerchief that the same vagabond
ties to the stick?
What is that handkerchief called?
Do these two things they tote about have names?
A bundle containing his clothes and possessions is called a
'bindle', whence the term 'bindlestiff' for a tramp who
carries such a bundle.

Brian
Peter T. Daniels
2006-10-26 23:37:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Brian M. Scott
On Thu, 26 Oct 2006 20:39:55 GMT, Nancy Pi Squared
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What is the stick called that a vagrant ties the red &
white polka dot handkerchief to?
I can google 'till the cows come home but I haven't found
what that stick, held over one shoulder, is actually
called?
What about the little handkerchief that the same vagabond
ties to the stick?
What is that handkerchief called?
Do these two things they tote about have names?
A bundle containing his clothes and possessions is called a
'bindle', whence the term 'bindlestiff' for a tramp who
carries such a bundle.
I was thinking "boodle"?
Lars Eighner
2006-10-26 21:12:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In our last episode,
<15mmac01pmiwu.11q9lf7q4vky3$***@40tude.net>,
the lovely and talented Nancy Pi Squared
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What is the stick called that a vagrant ties the red & white polka dot
handkerchief to?
bindle, hence, bindle-stiff for hobo.
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
I can google 'till the cows come home but I haven't found what that stick,
held over one shoulder, is actually called?
What about the little handkerchief that the same vagabond ties to the
stick?
What is that handkerchief called?
Do these two things they tote about have names?
Thanks,
Nancy
--
Lars Eighner <http://larseighner.com/> <http://myspace.com/larseighner>
At the touch of love, everyone becomes a poet. --Plato
Harlan Messinger
2006-10-26 21:17:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What is the stick called that a vagrant ties the red & white polka dot
handkerchief to?
I can google 'till the cows come home but I haven't found what that stick,
held over one shoulder, is actually called?
What about the little handkerchief that the same vagabond ties to the
stick?
What is that handkerchief called?
For US hobo terminology, see "bindle", "bindle stick", "bindle stiff" at

http://www.hobonickels.org/alpert04.htm

In Australia, a swagman carries his swag (bedroll) and tuckerbag (sack
of food), but I don't know if either is on a stick.
Mike Lyle
2006-10-26 21:25:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Harlan Messinger
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What is the stick called that a vagrant ties the red & white polka dot
handkerchief to?
I can google 'till the cows come home but I haven't found what that stick,
held over one shoulder, is actually called?
What about the little handkerchief that the same vagabond ties to the
stick?
What is that handkerchief called?
For US hobo terminology, see "bindle", "bindle stick", "bindle stiff" at
http://www.hobonickels.org/alpert04.htm
I wish I'd held my peace now! "Bindle" and relatives are wonderful. But
OED says merely "US and Canadian slang...A bundle containing clothes
and possessions, esp. a bedding-roll carried by a tramp. Hence
bindle-man, -stiff, a tramp who carries such a bundle."
Post by Harlan Messinger
In Australia, a swagman carries his swag (bedroll) and tuckerbag (sack
of food), but I don't know if either is on a stick.
No stick that I've ever heard of; and there'd be no advantage in
carrying a blanket-roll on the end of a stick. The bundle on a stick
was strictly fairy-story stuff for me, and I never saw the logic of it.
--
Mike.
Harlan Messinger
2006-10-26 21:31:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike Lyle
Post by Harlan Messinger
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What is the stick called that a vagrant ties the red & white polka dot
handkerchief to?
I can google 'till the cows come home but I haven't found what that stick,
held over one shoulder, is actually called?
What about the little handkerchief that the same vagabond ties to the
stick?
What is that handkerchief called?
For US hobo terminology, see "bindle", "bindle stick", "bindle stiff" at
http://www.hobonickels.org/alpert04.htm
I wish I'd held my peace now! "Bindle" and relatives are wonderful. But
OED says merely "US and Canadian slang...A bundle containing clothes
and possessions, esp. a bedding-roll carried by a tramp. Hence
bindle-man, -stiff, a tramp who carries such a bundle."
Post by Harlan Messinger
In Australia, a swagman carries his swag (bedroll) and tuckerbag (sack
of food), but I don't know if either is on a stick.
No stick that I've ever heard of; and there'd be no advantage in
carrying a blanket-roll on the end of a stick. The bundle on a stick
was strictly fairy-story stuff for me, and I never saw the logic of it.
Over the course of a day it's easier to bear the weight on top of the
shoulder than by carrying it in one's hand. Presumably a knapsack
(rucksack, backpack) wasn't available or affordable.
Mike Lyle
2006-10-26 22:19:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[...]
Post by Harlan Messinger
Post by Mike Lyle
I wish I'd held my peace now! "Bindle" and relatives are wonderful. But
OED says merely "US and Canadian slang...A bundle containing clothes
and possessions, esp. a bedding-roll carried by a tramp. Hence
bindle-man, -stiff, a tramp who carries such a bundle."
Post by Harlan Messinger
In Australia, a swagman carries his swag (bedroll) and tuckerbag (sack
of food), but I don't know if either is on a stick.
No stick that I've ever heard of; and there'd be no advantage in
carrying a blanket-roll on the end of a stick. The bundle on a stick
was strictly fairy-story stuff for me, and I never saw the logic of it.
Over the course of a day it's easier to bear the weight on top of the
shoulder than by carrying it in one's hand. Presumably a knapsack
(rucksack, backpack) wasn't available or affordable.
With the stick, you still have to use your hand, though I agree it
isn't bearing much of the weight. As for swaggies, well, the blanket
roll was classically slung on the back with rope, string, or strap.
--
Mike.
mb
2006-10-26 21:36:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Mike Lyle
...
Post by Mike Lyle
The bundle on a stick
was strictly fairy-story stuff for me, and I never saw the logic of it.
Because you didn't study first-hand the ergonomics of it, based on
Archimedes' principle of the lever.
Try wrapping 3-4 pounds (or more) of stuff in a piece of cloth tied by
its corners and carrying it for a couple hours. The best way to have
your hands free and not feel the weight is a longish stick with the
fulcrum on your shoulder and the free end tucked in the hollow of your
elbow.
Douglas G. Kilday
2006-10-27 03:54:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by mb
Mike Lyle
...
Post by Mike Lyle
The bundle on a stick
was strictly fairy-story stuff for me, and I never saw the logic of it.
Because you didn't study first-hand the ergonomics of it, based on
Archimedes' principle of the lever.
Try wrapping 3-4 pounds (or more) of stuff in a piece of cloth tied by
its corners and carrying it for a couple hours. The best way to have
your hands free and not feel the weight is a longish stick with the
fulcrum on your shoulder and the free end tucked in the hollow of your
elbow.
Yes. This was known in antiquity. The Latin word for the stick was
<aerumnula>, given by Paulus ex Festo: "aerumnulas Plautus refert
furcillas quibus religatas sarcinas viatores gerebant".
mb
2006-10-27 04:43:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Douglas G. Kilday
Post by mb
Mike Lyle
...
Post by Mike Lyle
The bundle on a stick
was strictly fairy-story stuff for me, and I never saw the logic of it.
Because you didn't study first-hand the ergonomics of it, based on
Archimedes' principle of the lever.
Try wrapping 3-4 pounds (or more) of stuff in a piece of cloth tied by
its corners and carrying it for a couple hours. The best way to have
your hands free and not feel the weight is a longish stick with the
fulcrum on your shoulder and the free end tucked in the hollow of your
elbow.
Yes. This was known in antiquity. The Latin word for the stick was
<aerumnula>, given by Paulus ex Festo: "aerumnulas Plautus refert
furcillas quibus religatas sarcinas viatores gerebant".
Ah, much better: The good aerumna, as I forgot to mention, must be a
furcilla. The forked tip avoids the sliding down of the bindle. Thanks.
Tony Cooper
2006-10-27 02:15:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike Lyle
Post by Harlan Messinger
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What is the stick called that a vagrant ties the red & white polka dot
handkerchief to?
I can google 'till the cows come home but I haven't found what that stick,
held over one shoulder, is actually called?
What about the little handkerchief that the same vagabond ties to the
stick?
What is that handkerchief called?
For US hobo terminology, see "bindle", "bindle stick", "bindle stiff" at
http://www.hobonickels.org/alpert04.htm
I wish I'd held my peace now! "Bindle" and relatives are wonderful. But
OED says merely "US and Canadian slang...A bundle containing clothes
and possessions, esp. a bedding-roll carried by a tramp. Hence
bindle-man, -stiff, a tramp who carries such a bundle."
Post by Harlan Messinger
In Australia, a swagman carries his swag (bedroll) and tuckerbag (sack
of food), but I don't know if either is on a stick.
No stick that I've ever heard of; and there'd be no advantage in
carrying a blanket-roll on the end of a stick. The bundle on a stick
was strictly fairy-story stuff for me, and I never saw the logic of it.
http://www.lausd.k12.ca.us/Belmont_HS/mice/bindle.html
--
Tony Cooper
Orlando, FL
R H Draney
2006-10-26 23:32:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Harlan Messinger
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What is the stick called that a vagrant ties the red & white polka dot
handkerchief to?
What is that handkerchief called?
For US hobo terminology, see "bindle", "bindle stick", "bindle stiff" at
http://www.hobonickels.org/alpert04.htm
In Australia, a swagman carries his swag (bedroll) and tuckerbag (sack
of food), but I don't know if either is on a stick.
"Tuckerbag" and "swag" may also be, respectively, the "kit" and "caboodle" one
often hears of....

In Japanese, the handkerchief is called "furoshiki", and wrapping up things for
carrying is just one of many uses for it....r
--
"Keep your eye on the Bishop. I want to know when
he makes his move", said the Inspector, obliquely.
Richard Bollard
2006-10-27 04:53:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 26 Oct 2006 17:17:09 -0400, Harlan Messinger
Post by Harlan Messinger
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What is the stick called that a vagrant ties the red & white polka dot
handkerchief to?
I can google 'till the cows come home but I haven't found what that stick,
held over one shoulder, is actually called?
What about the little handkerchief that the same vagabond ties to the
stick?
What is that handkerchief called?
For US hobo terminology, see "bindle", "bindle stick", "bindle stiff" at
http://www.hobonickels.org/alpert04.htm
In Australia, a swagman carries his swag (bedroll) and tuckerbag (sack
of food), but I don't know if either is on a stick.
There are a variety of terms for the burden:

From http://www.anu.edu.au/andc/ozwords/October_2004/Shiralee.html :
drum, swag, bundle, curse, matilda, shiralee, parcel, turkey, donkey,
national debt, and bluey.

More on matilda:

http://www.anu.edu.au/andc/ozwords/May_99/index.html

(Select no. 2.)
--
Richard Bollard
Canberra Australia

To email, I'm at AMT not spAMT.
John Holmes
2006-10-27 12:40:24 UTC
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Post by Richard Bollard
drum, swag, bundle, curse, matilda, shiralee, parcel, turkey, donkey,
national debt, and bluey.
http://www.anu.edu.au/andc/ozwords/May_99/index.html
(Select no. 2.)
Thanks for that, Richard. I remember having heard about the German
connection before, but hadn't seen it in such a detailed form.

There was also a school of thought that it wasn't originally "Matilda",
but "mit Hilda". "Auf die Walze gehen mit Hilda"?

Rey said he wasn't familiar with anything like that as an idiom, so
maybe that puts the kibosh on it, or else it was extremely obscure to
begin with. Maybe a Tanundadeutsch original?

--
Regards
John
for mail: my initials plus a u e
at tpg dot com dot au
Snidely
2006-10-27 21:59:56 UTC
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Richard Bollard wrote:
[...]
Post by Richard Bollard
http://www.anu.edu.au/andc/ozwords/May_99/index.html
(Select no. 2.)
I like the line elsewhere in that issue that reads, "they changed the
original p sound to an f, but did they use an F? Not on your
nelly!-they used a V and pretended that it made an effish sound"

/dps
Odysseus
2006-10-27 23:33:10 UTC
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In article <***@individual.net>,
Harlan Messinger <***@comcast.net> wrote:

<snip>
Post by Harlan Messinger
For US hobo terminology, see "bindle", "bindle stick", "bindle stiff" at
http://www.hobonickels.org/alpert04.htm
I've also heard "bindle" used to refer to a little piece of paper folded
into a sort of envelope, for carrying small quantities of cocaine,
methamphetamine, or other such powdery substances.
--
Odysseus
Reader
2006-10-26 22:15:56 UTC
Reply
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Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What is the stick called that a vagrant ties the red & white polka dot
handkerchief to?
I can google 'till the cows come home but I haven't found what that stick,
held over one shoulder, is actually called?
What about the little handkerchief that the same vagabond ties to the
stick?
A bindlestiff or bindlepike.
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What is that handkerchief called?
A bindle.
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
Do these two things they tote about have names?
Thanks,
Nancy
Steve Hayes
2006-10-27 03:36:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What is the stick called that a vagrant ties the red & white polka dot
handkerchief to?
Bindlestiff?

It's not in my dictionary, but it's the word that comes to mind.
--
Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://people.tribe.net/hayesstw
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
Tony Cooper
2006-10-27 03:41:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 27 Oct 2006 05:36:46 +0200, Steve Hayes
Post by Steve Hayes
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What is the stick called that a vagrant ties the red & white polka dot
handkerchief to?
Bindlestiff?
It's not in my dictionary, but it's the word that comes to mind.
The man, not the bindle that he carries.

From the poem "Bindlestiff" by Edwin Ford Piper:


The mesh of leafy branches rustled loud,
Into the road slid Bindlestiff. You’ve seen
The like of the traveller: gaunt humanity
In stained and broken coat, with untrimmed hedge 35
Of rusty beard and curling sunburnt hair;
His hat, once white, a dull uncertain cone;
His leathery hands and cheeks, his bright blue eyes
That always see new faces and strange dogs;
His mouth that laughs at life and at himself.

and another verse that speaks of the bindle:

Bindlestiff topped a hillock, against the sky 55
Showed stick and bundle with his extra shoes
Jauntily dangling. Bird to bird once more
Made low sweet answer; in the wild rose cups
The bee found yellow meal; all softly moved
The white and purple morning-glory bells 60
As on the gently rustling hedgetop leaves
The sun’s face rested. Bindlestiff was gone.
--
Tony Cooper
Orlando, FL
Steve Hayes
2006-10-27 03:54:16 UTC
Reply
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Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 27 Oct 2006 05:36:46 +0200, Steve Hayes
Post by Steve Hayes
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What is the stick called that a vagrant ties the red & white polka dot
handkerchief to?
Bindlestiff?
It's not in my dictionary, but it's the word that comes to mind.
The man, not the bindle that he carries.
I think my knowledge of it came from "A canticle for Leibowitz".
--
Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://people.tribe.net/hayesstw
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
TOF
2006-10-27 06:39:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What is the stick called that a vagrant ties the red & white polka dot
handkerchief to?
I can google 'till the cows come home but I haven't found what that stick,
held over one shoulder, is actually called?
What about the little handkerchief that the same vagabond ties to the
stick?
What is that handkerchief called?
Do these two things they tote about have names?
Thanks,
Nancy
I always thought it was that proverbial "knapsack" (on my back).
I love to go a-wandering,
Along the mountain track,
And as I go, I love to sing,
My knapsack on my back.

TOF
Snidely
2006-10-30 21:16:28 UTC
Reply
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TOF wrote:
[...]
Post by TOF
I always thought it was that proverbial "knapsack" (on my back).
I love to go a-wandering,
Along the mountain track,
And as I go, I love to sing,
My knapsack on my back.
knapsacks (and rucksacks -- ruck is from the German for "back" -- as in
anatomy) represent a higher standard of living than hobos usually have.

Hobos would tend to have few belongings (most of their clothes are
being worn), and few commercial products for carrying them. Hence
taking a scrap of fabric (which may also be their blanket or poncho, 2
uses makes the value higher), and tying everything up in it. Without a
built-in strap, you either rig something like a gunsling from scraps of
rope or a belt, or you hang it from a stick long enough that a light
touch with your hand has the leverage to balance the heavier bundle
behind (as in the posted picture, although a front view would be nice).

A few hobos might have a suitcase salvaged from some dump or garbage
bin, but once the handle broke off, it wouldn't be any fun to carry,
and even with the handle it would be a pain if you had to walk very
far. A hobo who rode the rails might keep it longer than one who was
on foot.

/dps
g***@ankerstein.org
2006-10-28 12:34:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What is the stick called that a vagrant ties the red & white polka dot
handkerchief to?
myth.

GFH
Gerry
2006-10-28 14:52:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What is the stick called that a vagrant ties the red & white polka dot
handkerchief to?
I can google 'till the cows come home but I haven't found what that stick,
held over one shoulder, is actually called?
What about the little handkerchief that the same vagabond ties to the
stick?
What is that handkerchief called?
Do these two things they tote about have names?
The bundle may be called a bindle.
The whole deal with the bindle on a stick may be called a bindlestiff.

The online MW says a bindlestiff is a hobo who carries a bindle.
But in the book _A Canticle for Liebowitz_, the term bindlestiff is clearly
used to denote the bindle-and-stick combination (it was part of the habit of
the Liebowitzian monks).

Gerry
Felicity Jones
2006-10-30 19:28:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What is the stick called that a vagrant ties the red & white polka dot
handkerchief to?
I can google 'till the cows come home but I haven't found what that stick,
held over one shoulder, is actually called?
What about the little handkerchief that the same vagabond ties to the
stick?
What is that handkerchief called?
Do these two things they tote about have names?
Thanks,
Nancy



In the Australian song, "Waltzing Matilda," the word "matilda" refers to
the bundle carried by a hobo. "Swag" refers to his bedroll.

Felicity
Chris Tsao
2006-11-08 03:00:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nancy Pi Squared
What is the stick called that a vagrant ties the red & white polka dot
handkerchief to?
I can google 'till the cows come home but I haven't found what that stick,
held over one shoulder, is actually called?
What about the little handkerchief that the same vagabond ties to the
stick?
What is that handkerchief called?
Do these two things they tote about have names?
Thanks,
Nancy
I forgot it. I just typed in "runaway slave" in Google Images and got
"stick-bundle" and then from that, I typed in stick bundle, and on the
first page got a cartoon drawing of vagrants carrying their belongings
with a cloth tied around a stick and a caption that said "bundle on a
stick." I checked up to page 3 and didn't see any other drawings.

http://historyproject.ucdavis.edu/khapp.php?Min=66

There might be another word for it? Unless stick-bundle is the word I
forgot?
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