Discussion:
What was Richard the Lionheart called in Arabic ?
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t***@gmail.com
2017-06-03 22:40:55 UTC
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Cunt face infidel.fuker I spect
Yusuf B Gursey
2017-06-04 14:42:39 UTC
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Cunt face infidel.fuker I spect
The earliest sources just give maliku~l-'ankilta:r or
simply al-'ankilta:r i.e. "The King of Angleterre (England)"
or only "Angleterre (England)" using the French word for "England"
Almost regularly "May God curse be upon him" is followed, as when talking
about most Crusaders. While this was a frequent epithet hurled at
adversaries during war, it had unusual persistence and regularity
during the Crusades.

Later sources have rika:rdu: (read: rika:rdo:) or some variation.
Yusuf B Gursey
2017-06-04 14:50:17 UTC
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Post by t***@gmail.com
Cunt face infidel.fuker I spect
The earliest sources just give maliku~l-'ankilta:r or
simply al-'ankilta:r i.e. "The King of Angleterre (England)"
or only "Angleterre (England)" using the French word for "England"
Almost regularly "May God curse be upon him" is followed, as when talking
about most Crusaders. While this was a frequent epithet hurled at
adversaries during war, it had unusual persistence and regularity
during the Crusades.
Later sources have rika:rdu: (read: rika:rdo:) or some variation.
Or rika:rdu(:)s read rika:rdos

See a previous post:

Yusuf B Gursey <***@shell01.TheWorld.com> wrote in message news:<***@world.std.com>...
- hide quoted text -
Post by Yusuf B Gursey
: Le Fri, 14 Dec 2001 15:22:04 -0000, "Earthdogg"
:>Can anyone help me with this question, please ?
:>
:>I'd like to know what the Arabs called Richard the Lionheart ?
:>
:>Cheers.
:>
: I do not know, but I would guess 'rishard al-qalb al-asad'. Just a
: guess...
qalbul'asad or *dh*uqalbil'asad would be the literal translation.
according to "arab historians of the crusades" byy francesco gabriela
(eng. trans.) simply "king of england". the original diplomatic
correspondece with saladin would be interesting though.
: Raymond
I concur about the correction. Whatever adverse opinion you may have
about Richard the Lionheart (!!!!!), his title as "Al Qalb Al Asad" as
suggested earlier would be wrong as it translates to "The Heart, The
Lion" (two proper nouns with two definit articles), whereas the
correct form would be "Qalb ul Asad" - literally the "Heart of the
Lion".

But if I have to rely on my basic History textbook taught in Lebanon,
the name Richard is not put in its anglicized form at all as everybody
seems to mention (including the argument whether to pronounce the
crucial "ch" as ch or sh as in Modern Arabic). In our books in Leanon
(it may be produced diferently in other Arab country textbooks) it is
in its westernized Greek/Latin form as "Rikardos" with the accent on
the second syllable - riKARdos (transliterated). Thus the fellow's
name, whatever you may think of him or his notorious acts would read
as "Rikardos Qalb ul Asad".

As to the name Saladin, again whatever you think of him as a person
(!!!!!), this is such a perversion of the proper much longer and
melodic name "Salahuddine" to which would be attached the dynasty he
came from, thus the name "Salahuddine al Ayyoubi". Of course he was an
ethnic Kurd, but it is questionable whether he used Kurdish or Arabic
in his court.

Interestingly, the textbook classify the period as "Houroub el
Faranga" (the wars of the Foreigners -- here Faranga or Franja means
anything foreign and not necessarily French). Very rarely are the wars
called "The Wars of the Crusades" (Houroub al Saleebiyyeen"). This was
as to put a fine but important distinction between the indegenous
Eastern Christian of the Middle East who never allied themselves with
the Crusades but rather stayed on the sidelines and those foreign
Christians invading the Holy Lands. Thus the historians refrained from
giving the wars a "Christian" aspect, but rather typified the war of
Freng European foreigners on the East.

To put a smile on everybody's face though about this sordid period,
allow me to tell you about this incident. We may not have been very
fond of King Richard's acts (nor were we particularly fond of history
classes as such), but we were certainly very fond of this unique name.
As a matter of fact, we had a great fun in calling our very
adventureous and notoriously mischievous classmate Ibrahim as "Barhoum
Qalb el Asad" for his brave practical jokes on our history teacher who
would throw him out week in week out without hesitation to his and our
great amusement!!! That's how the name stuck in my mind, or else I
would have forgotten about the Richard chap altogether.

May God bless you, my dearest classmate! To my mind, Ibrahim
(affectionately dubbed Barhoum Qalb ul Asad) remains very worthy of
the name Lionheart indeed!!! As courageous a man as one could ever
think about!!!

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