Discussion:
Semper ad eventum festinat et [ in medias res ] ...
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Hen Hanna
2018-01-27 17:40:52 UTC
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Semper ad eventum festinat et in medias res /
Non secus ac notas auditorem rapit.

('He always hastens to the issue
and hurries his hearers into the
midst of the story as if they knew it already.')


___________________

rapit is not French, Spanish... [rapido], funny.

rapit. at the end --- feels like German word-order, but
i guess in Latin this [rapit] can go anywhere in the S.


Festinate is one among many in the category of words whose first recorded use is in the works of Shakespeare (Advise the Duke where you are going, to a most festinate preparation.. ...........

Eng. [festinate] -- I've never heard of this before. wow.
Is it in SAT-prep word-lists?



I don't understand the [as if] construction.



Non secus --- Anon Sakasu

Trivia: [Sekasu] (verb) in Jp means [make someone hurry up].

"Hurry! Hurry!"

Koreans say: 빨리빨리 ! (Pali-Pali!)

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%EB%B9%A8%EB%A6%AC

much has been written about Korea's (Pali-Pali!) culture/mindset.
“Pali-pali” is a Korean expression which means "Hurry up" or "quickly". Pali-Pali expresses the rushing character of Korean people very well. In Korea you can s...
There is Pali-Pali culture in Korea, which means “Hurry up!” or “Faster!”. It is one of the Korean’s way of life. You can easily see people are running or ...
______________________________________
Wannabe-Linguist
Miśanthropic Wankja-SOBewski
better as:
Miśanthropic "Wankja-Boj" -ewski

aka the "Monkey" Linguist (of Sci.Lang)
because he's (apparently)
a Linguist Manque (Manqué)

HH
Peter T. Daniels
2018-01-27 19:59:06 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
Festinate is one among many in the category of words whose first recorded use is in the works of Shakespeare (Advise the Duke where you are going, to a most festinate preparation.. ...........
Eng. [festinate] -- I've never heard of this before. wow.
Is it in SAT-prep word-lists?
Since the only clue to where in "Shakespeare" the word occurs is the Duke
character, I shall assume this is from Love's Labour's Lost. That makes it a
unicum, a hapax, a satire of learned fools who insist on inventing Latinate
words because an English one won't do.

English does occasionally have the expression "festina lente," which could
give you a clew to its meaning.
Hen Hanna
2018-01-27 21:33:14 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Hen Hanna
Festinate is one among many in the category of words whose first recorded use is in the works of Shakespeare (Advise the Duke where you are going, to a most festinate preparation.. ...........
Eng. [festinate] -- I've never heard of this before. wow.
Is it in SAT-prep word-lists?
Since the only clue to where in "Shakespeare" the word occurs is the Duke
character, I shall assume this is from Love's Labour's Lost. That makes it a
unicum, a hapax, a satire of learned fools who insist on inventing Latinate
words because an English one won't do.
English does occasionally have the expression "festina lente," which could
give you a clew to its meaning.
thanks!


Hasty bitch bringeth forth blind whelps, The.
[Festinatio improvida est, et caeca. - Livy, xxii ...

used in Utopia by More

caeca --> caecum in Eng. ciego in Sp.



i'm still looking for a good proverb/expression
re: [before breakfast] in any language. HH


... proverb "Patience is a good nag, but she'll bolt"
Horace LaBadie
2018-01-27 23:29:23 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Hen Hanna
Festinate is one among many in the category of words whose first recorded
use is in the works of Shakespeare (Advise the Duke where you are going,
to a most festinate preparation.. ...........
Eng. [festinate] -- I've never heard of this before. wow.
Is it in SAT-prep word-lists?
Since the only clue to where in "Shakespeare" the word occurs is the Duke
character, I shall assume this is from Love's Labour's Lost. That makes it a
unicum, a hapax, a satire of learned fools who insist on inventing Latinate
words because an English one won't do.
English does occasionally have the expression "festina lente," which could
give you a clew to its meaning.
thanks!
Hasty bitch bringeth forth blind whelps, The.
[Festinatio improvida est, et caeca. - Livy, xxii ...
used in Utopia by More
caeca --> caecum in Eng. ciego in Sp.
i'm still looking for a good proverb/expression
re: [before breakfast] in any language. HH
... proverb "Patience is a good nag, but she'll bolt"
You don't accept Lewis Carroll as good? That says a lot about you.
Hen Hanna
2018-01-30 22:56:30 UTC
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Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Hen Hanna
Festinate is one among many in the category of words whose first recorded
use is in the works of Shakespeare (Advise the Duke where you are going,
to a most festinate preparation.. ...........
Eng. [festinate] -- I've never heard of this before. wow.
Is it in SAT-prep word-lists?
Since the only clue to where in "Shakespeare" the word occurs is the Duke
character, I shall assume this is from Love's Labour's Lost. That makes it a
unicum, a hapax, a satire of learned fools who insist on inventing Latinate
words because an English one won't do.
English does occasionally have the expression "festina lente," which could
give you a clew to its meaning.
thanks!
Hasty bitch bringeth forth blind whelps, The.
[Festinatio improvida est, et caeca. - Livy, xxii ...
used in Utopia by More
caeca --> caecum in Eng. ciego in Sp.
i'm still looking for a good proverb/expression
re: [before breakfast] in any language. HH
... proverb "Patience is a good nag, but she'll bolt"
You don't accept Lewis Carroll as good? That says a lot about you.
yes, I did and do accept it. Thank you


Un marchand de vin est allé en Champagne.
Il a visité des caves à la campagne.
Il a acheté douze bouteilles
De Magnum. Il est rentré
En TGV confortable en Grande-Bretagne.

--- i understand the meaing.
but i don't see what's funny about it.
(it must be good, but how?)


pls tell me (give me) a really good Limerick in French
(or Spanish or German ... ) HH

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