Discussion:
defenestrate -- festinate
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Hen Hanna
2018-01-27 22:49:21 UTC
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de·fen·es·trate [dēˈfenəˌstrāt] VERB

1. rare

throw (someone) out of a window:
"she had made up her mind that the woman had been defenestrated, although the official verdict had been suicide"

2. informal
remove or dismiss (someone) from a position of power or authority:
"the overwhelming view is that he should be defenestrated before the next election"


_____________________

defenestrate -- I've been wondering for 20? years... Why do they
have a word for it?
--- was it THAT common as a form of suicide ?

it's rare even in movies !

and to think that maybe 1/2 of English-speaking ppl
who know this word
would understand it, & use it _without_
knowing Ger. Fenster !

_____________________

Hasty bitch bringeth forth blind whelps, The.
[Festinatio improvida est, et caeca. - Livy, xxii ...

used in Utopia by More
_____________________

festinate sounds like it should mean "fasten"
like Ger. fest.

or related to festive.


Feste was my fav. in the BBC Shakespeare on TV, but
now i can only remember Ben Kingsley's face.

re: his name -- he is surely festive.
was his name supposed to also suggest Hastiness?
Feste is a fool in the William Shakespeare comedy Twelfth Night. He is attached to the household of the Countess Olivia. He has apparently been there for some time, as he was a "fool that the Lady Olivia's fathe… .........
__________________________

if i can put together 200 entries like this,
it could be published as a book
under a different byline.

with the title [ Alphabest Juice ]

(I'd be the ghostwriter, or one of them.) HH
Mścisław Wojna-Bojewski
2018-01-27 23:28:28 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
de·fen·es·trate [dēˈfenəˌstrāt] VERB
1. rare
"she had made up her mind that the woman had been defenestrated, although the official verdict had been suicide"
2. informal
"the overwhelming view is that he should be defenestrated before the next election"
_____________________
defenestrate -- I've been wondering for 20? years... Why do they
have a word for it?
--- was it THAT common as a form of suicide ?
Go read a history book. Why should we do your homework for you?
Horace LaBadie
2018-01-27 23:31:25 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
defenestrate -- I've been wondering for 20? years... Why do they
have a word for it?
--- was it THAT common as a form of suicide ?
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Defenestrations_of_Prague>
Hen Hanna
2018-01-28 02:55:21 UTC
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Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Hen Hanna
defenestrate -- I've been wondering for 20? years... Why do they
have a word for it?
--- was it THAT common as a form of suicide ?
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Defenestrations_of_Prague>
thank you ... that's very helpful.


what are some instances wherein
Mścister Wonkja-Boj has
demonstrated ling. expert knowledge, etc ?

pls give me some keywords so i can do a search. Thnk you. HH
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Hen Hanna
There is a range of hacker witticisms referring to "defenestration". For example, the term is sometimes used humorously among GNU/Linux users to describe the act of removing Microsoft Windows from a computer.[28]
2. The act of exiting a window system in order to get better response time from a full-screen program.

----- this must be very uncommon now.
5 years ago, i knew a computer professional
who was still doing this... I think he was
using a windows-like file-browser system on DOS

something like DOS Shell


Ger. Fenster, French fenetre .... English is orphaned.
Mścisław Wojna-Bojewski
2018-01-29 03:38:42 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Hen Hanna
defenestrate -- I've been wondering for 20? years... Why do they
have a word for it?
--- was it THAT common as a form of suicide ?
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Defenestrations_of_Prague>
thank you ... that's very helpful.
what are some instances wherein
Mścister Wonkja-Boj has
demonstrated ling. expert knowledge, etc ?
Why should I tell you? Do your own homework.
Daud Deden
2018-01-28 22:38:43 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
de·fen·es·trate [dēˈfenəˌstrāt] VERB
1. rare
"she had made up her mind that the woman had been defenestrated, although the official verdict had been suicide"
2. informal
"the overwhelming view is that he should be defenestrated before the next election"
_____________________
defenestrate -- I've been wondering for 20? years... Why do they
have a word for it?
--- was it THAT common as a form of suicide ?
it's rare even in movies !
and to think that maybe 1/2 of English-speaking ppl
who know this word
would understand it, & use it _without_
knowing Ger. Fenster !
_____________________
Hasty bitch bringeth forth blind whelps, The.
[Festinatio improvida est, et caeca. - Livy, xxii ...
used in Utopia by More
_____________________
festinate sounds like it should mean "fasten"
like Ger. fest.
or related to festive.
Feste was my fav. in the BBC Shakespeare on TV, but
now i can only remember Ben Kingsley's face.
re: his name -- he is surely festive.
was his name supposed to also suggest Hastiness?
Feste is a fool in the William Shakespeare comedy Twelfth Night. He is attached to the household of the Countess Olivia. He has apparently been there for some time, as he was a "fool that the Lady Olivia's fathe… .........
__________________________
if i can put together 200 entries like this,
it could be published as a book
under a different byline.
with the title [ Alphabest Juice ]
(I'd be the ghostwriter, or one of them.) HH
---
***@Malay (Portg?): in/at the window

defenestra(te) related to spinster/s.pin.dle.r/spider-pitla?-doorshield/(fasten)shutter/windshield/window/***@Malay:door(jamb, s.pin.dle)...

1st: huts were lifted domeshield/domicile - the shield was the whole house

2nd: huts were opened (smokehole/golomt/calumet) and covered by rolled roundshield/tono/kolo/wheel/windshield (or set upright in opening)

3rd: huts were clasped/pinched/hinged/pinned to swivel, or slid in frame (rectified)
Hen Hanna
2018-01-29 19:49:26 UTC
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Post by Daud Deden
Post by Hen Hanna
de·fen·es·trate [dēˈfenəˌstrāt] VERB
1. rare
"she had made up her mind that the woman had been defenestrated, although the official verdict had been suicide"
2. informal
"the overwhelming view is that he should be defenestrated before the next election"
_____________________
defenestrate -- I've been wondering for 20? years... Why do they
have a word for it?
--- was it THAT common as a form of suicide ?
it's rare even in movies !
and to think that maybe 1/2 of English-speaking ppl
who know this word
would understand it, & use it _without_
knowing Ger. Fenster !
_____________________
Hasty bitch bringeth forth blind whelps, The.
[Festinatio improvida est, et caeca. - Livy, xxii ...
used in Utopia by More
_____________________
festinate sounds like it should mean "fasten"
like Ger. fest.
or related to festive.
Feste was my fav. in the BBC Shakespeare on TV, but
now i can only remember Ben Kingsley's face.
re: his name -- he is surely festive.
was his name supposed to also suggest Hastiness?
Feste is a fool in the William Shakespeare comedy Twelfth Night. He is attached to the household of the Countess Olivia. He has apparently been there for some time, as he was a "fool that the Lady Olivia's fathe… .........
__________________________
if i can put together 200 entries like this,
it could be published as a book
under a different byline.
with the title [ Alphabest Juice ]
(I'd be the ghostwriter, or one of them.) HH
---
1st: huts were lifted domeshield/domicile - the shield was the whole house
2nd: huts were opened (smokehole/golomt/calumet) and covered by rolled roundshield/tono/kolo/wheel/windshield (or set upright in opening)
3rd: huts were clasped/pinched/hinged/pinned to swivel, or slid in frame (rectified)
defenestra(te) doesn't seem to be related to spinster


speaking of spinster(s)............


(mid-1800s?) George du Manner wrote many Limericks in French under the name of ”
Vers Nonsensiques.”

II existe une espinstere a Tours
Un peu vite, et qui portait toujours
Un ulster peau-de-phoque,
Un chapeau bilicoque
Et des nicrebocquers en velours.


Is the main funny part... phoque and coque ?

[Un peu vite] means:
fidgety,
antsy · nervous · keyed up · anxious ·
jittery · twitchy ... ?

HH
Daud Deden
2018-01-29 23:01:31 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Daud Deden
Post by Hen Hanna
de·fen·es·trate [dēˈfenəˌstrāt] VERB
1. rare
"she had made up her mind that the woman had been defenestrated, although the official verdict had been suicide"
2. informal
"the overwhelming view is that he should be defenestrated before the next election"
_____________________
defenestrate -- I've been wondering for 20? years... Why do they
have a word for it?
--- was it THAT common as a form of suicide ?
it's rare even in movies !
and to think that maybe 1/2 of English-speaking ppl
who know this word
would understand it, & use it _without_
knowing Ger. Fenster !
_____________________
Hasty bitch bringeth forth blind whelps, The.
[Festinatio improvida est, et caeca. - Livy, xxii ...
used in Utopia by More
_____________________
festinate sounds like it should mean "fasten"
like Ger. fest.
or related to festive.
Feste was my fav. in the BBC Shakespeare on TV, but
now i can only remember Ben Kingsley's face.
re: his name -- he is surely festive.
was his name supposed to also suggest Hastiness?
Feste is a fool in the William Shakespeare comedy Twelfth Night. He is attached to the household of the Countess Olivia. He has apparently been there for some time, as he was a "fool that the Lady Olivia's fathe… .........
__________________________
if i can put together 200 entries like this,
it could be published as a book
under a different byline.
with the title [ Alphabest Juice ]
(I'd be the ghostwriter, or one of them.) HH
---
1st: huts were lifted domeshield/domicile - the shield was the whole house
2nd: huts were opened (smokehole/golomt/calumet) and covered by rolled roundshield/tono/kolo/wheel/windshield (or set upright in opening)
3rd: huts were clasped/pinched/hinged/pinned to swivel, or slid in frame (rectified)
defenestra(te) doesn't seem to be related to spinster
speaking of spinster(s)............
(mid-1800s?) George du Manner wrote many Limericks in French under the name of ”
Vers Nonsensiques.”
II existe une espinstere a Tours
Un peu vite, et qui portait toujours
Un ulster peau-de-phoque,
Un chapeau bilicoque
Et des nicrebocquers en velours.
Is the main funny part... phoque and coque ?
fidgety,
antsy · nervous · keyed up · anxious ·
jittery · twitchy ... ?
HH
-

Grimm Bros. version: "Rapunzel, Rapunzel, throw out your hair" (out the window)
An influence on Grimm's Rapunzel was Petrosinella or Parsley, written by Giambattista Basile in his collection of fairy tales in 1634, Lo cunto de li cunti (The Story of Stories), or Pentamerone.

But I thought she was a spinner/spinster. My error. Alas.
Dingbat
2018-02-02 21:47:54 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
de·fen·es·trate [dēˈfenəˌstrāt] VERB
1. rare
"she had made up her mind that the woman had been defenestrated, although the official verdict had been suicide"
2. informal
"the overwhelming view is that he should be defenestrated before the next election"
_____________________
defenestrate -- I've been wondering for 20? years... Why do they
have a word for it?
You need to be thrown and land in a pile of dung to know the answer.
Post by Hen Hanna
and to think that maybe 1/2 of English-speaking ppl
who know this word
would understand it, & use it _without_
knowing Ger. Fenster !
Most would know it by reading. You, OTOH, need experience.

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