Discussion:
Triphthongs in Proto-Arabic. Triphthongs?
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Yusuf B Gursey
2017-06-08 22:50:34 UTC
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The development of the triphthongs in Quranic and Classical Arabic

https://openaccess.leidenuniv.nl/handle/1887/47177

Could one use "triphthong" for awa or aya or awu etc. when
one vowel is on a different syllable? I think not.
DKleinecke
2017-06-09 02:13:28 UTC
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Post by Yusuf B Gursey
The development of the triphthongs in Quranic and Classical Arabic
https://openaccess.leidenuniv.nl/handle/1887/47177
Could one use "triphthong" for awa or aya or awu etc. when
one vowel is on a different syllable? I think not.
The article says:

“Triphthong” in its Semitistic context has a slightly different
meaning than in the general linguistic context. We take
triphthong to have the Semitic meaning of a sequence of a
short vowel–glide–short vowel.

I have no idea where his "Semitic meaning" comes from. My
best guess at the moment would be that "triphthong"
translates some Arabic term.

I wonder what happens when the glide is geminated.
Yusuf B Gursey
2017-06-09 06:01:18 UTC
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On Friday, June 9, 2017 at 5:13:30 AM UTC+3, DKleinecke wrote:

Here's a reply I got from another group:

Marijn van Putten It really is the conventional term used by semitists. And yes it's wrong, but it's also a useful short word to talk about vowel-glide-vowel sequences. I wouldn't even know where to begin to cite examples of it being used in this way. just go to Google books and type "triphthong Semitic", and all the first hits use it exactly in this meaning.

Ahmad Al-Jallad Marijn van Putten see collapse of triphthongs in huehnergard and rubin's essay on classification of Semitic in Weninger's handbook for example.
Post by DKleinecke
Post by Yusuf B Gursey
The development of the triphthongs in Quranic and Classical Arabic
https://openaccess.leidenuniv.nl/handle/1887/47177
Could one use "triphthong" for awa or aya or awu etc. when
one vowel is on a different syllable? I think not.
“Triphthong” in its Semitistic context has a slightly different
meaning than in the general linguistic context. We take
triphthong to have the Semitic meaning of a sequence of a
short vowel–glide–short vowel.
I have no idea where his "Semitic meaning" comes from. My
best guess at the moment would be that "triphthong"
translates some Arabic term.
I wonder what happens when the glide is geminated.
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