Discussion:
in German, Butter is uncountable, but Cheese is countable
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Hen Hanna
2017-06-08 00:30:02 UTC
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Das Wort „Butter“ ist unzählbar: Es gibt weder „Buttern“ noch „Bütter“.


in German, Butter is uncountable, but Cheese is countable


does this make sense?

is it common in other languages?

Is it because ppl often eat pieces of Cheese
with their fingers?

_____________________

Which kinds of cheese are your favorite?
Which cheeses are your favorite?


McClavy plans to have 12 kinds of cheese in constant rotation on the boards at all times.


When Charles de Gaulle complained about the difficulty of governing a country that had 246 different kinds of cheese, he articulated the despair of French government officials since time immemorial: not until nearly the middle ...


HH

(thank you for the help with SWF.)
Arnaud Fournet
2017-06-08 05:33:53 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
Das Wort „Butter“ ist unzählbar: Es gibt weder „Buttern“ noch „Bütter“.
in German, Butter is uncountable, but Cheese is countable
does this make sense?
is it common in other languages?
Is it because ppl often eat pieces of Cheese
with their fingers?
_____________________
Which kinds of cheese are your favorite?
Which cheeses are your favorite?
McClavy plans to have 12 kinds of cheese in constant rotation on the boards at all times.
When Charles de Gaulle complained about the difficulty of governing a country that had 246 different kinds of cheese, he articulated the despair of French government officials since time immemorial: not until nearly the middle ...
Wasn't it rather 345 like the number of days?
A.
wugi
2017-06-10 09:19:04 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
Das Wort „Butter“ ist unzählbar: Es gibt weder „Buttern“ noch „Bütter“.
in German, Butter is uncountable, but Cheese is countable
does this make sense?
is it common in other languages?
Is it because ppl often eat pieces of Cheese
with their fingers?
Some verbs have transitional uses besides intransitional ones, similarly
some words may be used in an uncountable and in a countable meaning.

Cheese as a kind of matter is like butter. Same for water, beer, wine
etc. But as portions of food, or brands, they could be countable of course.
That may be in a different way however than when expressing "pieces" of
sth. For example:
no plural (that's already the case with time and length units...), or
the use of diminutives, as in Dutch; ...

Drie jaar, vijf maanden, twee kilometer, vele jaren en weinig
kilometers: three year(s), five months, two kilometer, many years and
few kilometers...
Drie bier en twee wijn aub: three beer and two wine, please (?)
We hadden twee watertjes en drie biertjes gevraagd: we'd asked two water
and three beer.
De Belgische kazen zijn even goed als de Franse: Belgian cheeses are as
good as French ones.
--
guido wugi
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