Discussion:
Je ner l'ai pacht geseen. -- (Macaronic)
(too old to reply)
Hen Hanna
2017-04-16 01:04:35 UTC
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"naddy" a dit> en.wiktionary.org/wiki/geen
"Compare German [jener]."
My response: Thank you!
Je ner l'ai pacht geseen!

i was pleased with this, which combines
Je ne l'ai pas vu. and
Ich habe es nicht gesehen.

____________________________

Could someone try some hybrid (Macaronic) sentences?

i'm mostly interested in Eng, French, Ger.
maybe Spanish.

Any proverb or c.p. (catch phrase) would be great.
-- e.g.


Penis : mightier than the sword.

This is a pen.
This is not a pipe.

I am a boy.
I am not a crook.

River run past eve and adam's.

La plume de ma tante est sur la table.

"All your base are belong to us"
or
[All your bases belong to us.] (now)


Thank you. HH
wugi
2017-04-16 20:15:39 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
Could someone try some hybrid (Macaronic) sentences?
i'm mostly interested in Eng, French, Ger.
maybe Spanish.
Any proverb or c.p. (catch phrase) would be great.
-- e.g.
(*)
Post by Hen Hanna
Penis : mightier than the sword.
This is a pen.
This is not a pipe.
Fellatio according to Magritte:
Ceci n'est pas une pipe.

Parsing puzzle in Dutch: depenisvanjezus.
Different psychosocial conclusions, according to readers' different
readings:
de penis van Jezus
de pen is van Jezus
de pen is van je zus
de penis van je zus ;-)

(*) Here of course you tap well-nigh inexhaustible sources, in a variety
of registers.
A selection of mine, some with their little story:

My mother, bless her, worked many years for Philips and would at times
have to answer phones from abroad. Some citations from her:
I weiss nicht.
One moment, bitte.

When enjoying a stay in the Luxemburg, we would jokingly order
Forelle aux amygdales!
(truite aux amandes. D. Forel met amandelen. Amandelen = almonds F.
amandes, OR tonsils F. amygdales).
Some waiters would know and smile.

Flemish puns in Germany.
***
- Sigarette bitte?
- Nein danke, ich schmöre nicht.
(smoren = dial. for roken = rauchen)
***
- Schmecklich! (smakelijk! Good appetite! = Guten Appetit!)
- Vons gleichen! (vans gelijken = dial. for insgelijks: same to you)
(A friend of mine when saying "Schmecklich!" was understood badly. They
thought he'd said "Schmeckt nicht!" and he had to explain the pun).

Nederspaans.
My wife's friends invented some "Flemish Spanish":
Lekkerísimo!
Ique oco! = Ik ook! Me too!

Onderlands. (Downlandic = French = south of Dutch)
***
My uncle in Toulouse introduced some Flemicisms in his French circles:
Le café est clair! ("prêt"; ready: de koffie is klaar!)
C'est très lècre! (lekker)
***
A Dutch cabaretier (Toon Hermans) compared
Af en toe (= nu en dan, now and then) with
Avant tout (first of all).

Mock foreign speak.
***
We have mock Latin:
Ditis nepis potentis negro te.
Parsing well:
Dit is ne pispot en 't is ne grote.
This is a pisspot and it's a big one.
***
Mock Spanish:
Despanto. Está? Con paxe.
D'hesp hangt do [daar]. Is't d'aa? [de uwe]. Kom, pak ze.
The bacon is suspended over there. Is it yours? Come and take it.
***
A Dutchman living in Paris had this text at his front door:
"Sachiez belle. Savons ni belle. Chez nu patient."
Read
Sachies belle. 's Avonds ni belle. SZJenuwpatiënt.
or in "schoon" Dutch:
Zachtjes bellen. 's Avonds niet bellen. Zenuwpatiënt.
Ring softly. Don't ring evenings. Neurotic person.
***
An authentic mnemonic, bethought for a Dutch Frenchspeaking king by a
counsellor:
"d'ou elle ainsi ni d'homme":
Doe wel en zie niet om.
Act for the good and don't look behind.
***
US revisited.
Je naait 't steeds:
United States
(you always sew it).

Expression hazards.
***
Schwein haben.
There is a longish joke about a Dutch person learning the meaning of
"Du hast Schwein gehabt" (you have been lucky). Later, at a gala party,
when asked by his host if he's already had a dance with the latter's
beautiful daughter, he puts his new knowledge in practice when answering:
"Nein, das Schwein habe ich noch nicht gehabt".
***
Fokker[ij].
There is another joke about a Flemish (or Dutch) royalty (or politician)
invited at an event at the British royal court.
When struggling for material to converse with the Queen, he remembers
having heard about her fondness of horses and horse breeding (paarden
fokken) and breaks loose:
"Your Majesty, I've heard you 'fock' horses?"
"Beg y'r pardon?!?" says the Queen, in shock.
"Ja, paarden!", says the other.

Enzetera (enzovoort etcetera).
--
guido wugi
Hen Hanna
2017-04-17 01:21:04 UTC
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Thank you -- that's quite a treat.
Give me at least a week to go thru those.


i forgot to give this example (c.p.):

"Elle a chaud au cul."

El "achoo" ocul

L Ash Owe Eye (smells fish)

Harasho - ???


_________________
i think i got help with the wording of
these earlier here (in Sci.Lang)


Was ist schwarz und weiß und wird überall gelesen?


American: Was ist schwarz und
weiss und uberall gelesen?

German students: Was?

American: Eine Zeitung!!!
Post by wugi
Post by Hen Hanna
Could someone try some hybrid (Macaronic) sentences?
i'm mostly interested in Eng, French, Ger.
maybe Spanish.
Any proverb or c.p. (catch phrase) would be great.
-- e.g.
(*)
Post by Hen Hanna
Penis : mightier than the sword.
This is a pen.
This is not a pipe.
Ceci n'est pas une pipe.
Parsing puzzle in Dutch: depenisvanjezus.
Different psychosocial conclusions, according to readers' different
de penis van Jezus
de pen is van Jezus
de pen is van je zus
de penis van je zus ;-)
(*) Here of course you tap well-nigh inexhaustible sources, in a variety
of registers.
My mother, bless her, worked many years for Philips and would at times
I weiss nicht.
One moment, bitte.
When enjoying a stay in the Luxemburg, we would jokingly order
Forelle aux amygdales!
(truite aux amandes. D. Forel met amandelen. Amandelen = almonds F.
amandes, OR tonsils F. amygdales).
Some waiters would know and smile.
Flemish puns in Germany.
***
- Sigarette bitte?
- Nein danke, ich schmöre nicht.
(smoren = dial. for roken = rauchen)
***
- Schmecklich! (smakelijk! Good appetite! = Guten Appetit!)
- Vons gleichen! (vans gelijken = dial. for insgelijks: same to you)
(A friend of mine when saying "Schmecklich!" was understood badly. They
thought he'd said "Schmeckt nicht!" and he had to explain the pun).
Nederspaans.
Lekkerísimo!
Ique oco! = Ik ook! Me too!
Onderlands. (Downlandic = French = south of Dutch)
***
Le café est clair! ("prêt"; ready: de koffie is klaar!)
C'est très lècre! (lekker)
***
A Dutch cabaretier (Toon Hermans) compared
Af en toe (= nu en dan, now and then) with
Avant tout (first of all).
Mock foreign speak.
***
Ditis nepis potentis negro te.
Dit is ne pispot en 't is ne grote.
This is a pisspot and it's a big one.
***
Despanto. Está? Con paxe.
D'hesp hangt do [daar]. Is't d'aa? [de uwe]. Kom, pak ze.
The bacon is suspended over there. Is it yours? Come and take it.
***
"Sachiez belle. Savons ni belle. Chez nu patient."
Read
Sachies belle. 's Avonds ni belle. SZJenuwpatiënt.
Zachtjes bellen. 's Avonds niet bellen. Zenuwpatiënt.
Ring softly. Don't ring evenings. Neurotic person.
***
An authentic mnemonic, bethought for a Dutch Frenchspeaking king by a
Doe wel en zie niet om.
Act for the good and don't look behind.
***
US revisited.
United States
(you always sew it).
Expression hazards.
***
Schwein haben.
There is a longish joke about a Dutch person learning the meaning of
"Du hast Schwein gehabt" (you have been lucky). Later, at a gala party,
when asked by his host if he's already had a dance with the latter's
"Nein, das Schwein habe ich noch nicht gehabt".
***
Fokker[ij].
There is another joke about a Flemish (or Dutch) royalty (or politician)
invited at an event at the British royal court.
When struggling for material to converse with the Queen, he remembers
having heard about her fondness of horses and horse breeding (paarden
"Your Majesty, I've heard you 'fock' horses?"
"Beg y'r pardon?!?" says the Queen, in shock.
"Ja, paarden!", says the other.
Enzetera (enzovoort etcetera).
--
guido wugi
wugi
2017-04-19 19:14:05 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
Thank you -- that's quite a treat.
Give me at least a week to go thru those.
I forgot some citations from a German-and-English prof in highschool.
They're cases of ambiguous 'soundalikes'.

E. I look in the brook and I see my picture.

brook = Du. het moeras, het broek (~obs. save in names: Brussel <
broek-zele, house on the brook, cf. Ge. Bruchsal).
But Du. de broek = trousers, cf. breeches.
Du. pik (echoed in picture) = the male apparatus;-)

And Ge. Ich lege die Uhr auf meinen Tisch.

Uhr sounds like du. hoer, whore.
Tisj in Flem. dial. = pik, see above.

Then there is Zurich airport Kloten,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Z%C3%BCrich_Airport
in Du. ambiguous https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kloten
hence https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teelbal

And an Argentinan province Neuquén, which echoes Du. neuken, L. 'coīre'.

--
guido wugi
Hen Hanna
2017-05-03 19:20:42 UTC
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Post by wugi
Post by Hen Hanna
Thank you -- that's quite a treat.
Give me at least a week to go thru those.
I forgot some citations from a German-and-English prof in highschool.
They're cases of ambiguous 'soundalikes'.
E. I look in the brook and I see my picture.
brook = Du. het moeras, het broek (~obs. save in names: Brussel <
broek-zele, house on the brook, cf. Ge. Bruchsal).
But Du. de broek = trousers, cf. breeches.
Du. pik (echoed in picture) = the male apparatus;-)
And Ge. Ich lege die Uhr auf meinen Tisch.
Uhr sounds like du. hoer, whore.
Tisj in Flem. dial. = pik, see above.
Then there is Zurich airport Kloten,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Z%C3%BCrich_Airport
in Du. ambiguous https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kloten
hence https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teelbal
And an Argentinan province Neuquén, which echoes Du. neuken, L. 'coīre'.
--
guido wugi
what you said reminds me of Hamlet. and his girl.

Could you send me email ... I want to ask you something. HH
Post by wugi
And Ge. Ich lege die Uhr auf meinen Tisch.
Americans confuse lie/lay alot, with similar results.

Hen Hanna
2017-04-18 13:44:42 UTC
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Post by wugi
Expression hazards.
***
Schwein haben.
There is a longish joke about a Dutch person learning the meaning of
"Du hast Schwein gehabt" (you have been lucky). Later, at a gala party,
when asked by his host if he's already had a dance with the latter's
"Nein, das Schwein habe ich noch nicht gehabt".
***
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Schwein_haben

Beispiele: [1] Beim Fußballspielen hab ich gestern mächtig Schwein gehabt.


So from this example, i guess this woudl've been correct:
(no i dont have a guess)

Does "das Schwein" always lead to an incorrect use of this idiom?


Italienisch: [1] avere culo → it (wörtlich: Arsch haben)

Französisch: [1] avoir du pot → fr, avoir du bol → fr, avoir de la veine → fr

pot can be ass.
bol is bowl, luck.
vein is 1.(anatomy) vein, 2.(geology) vein, seam, 3. luck

So i wonder: in English, the slang [get lucky] means [have sex].
[avere culo , avoir du pot, avoir du bol] are the same idea?

HH
Arnaud Fournet
2017-04-18 15:50:18 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
Post by wugi
Expression hazards.
***
Schwein haben.
There is a longish joke about a Dutch person learning the meaning of
"Du hast Schwein gehabt" (you have been lucky). Later, at a gala party,
when asked by his host if he's already had a dance with the latter's
"Nein, das Schwein habe ich noch nicht gehabt".
***
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Schwein_haben
Beispiele: [1] Beim Fußballspielen hab ich gestern mächtig Schwein gehabt.
(no i dont have a guess)
Does "das Schwein" always lead to an incorrect use of this idiom?
Italienisch: [1] avere culo → it (wörtlich: Arsch haben)
Französisch: [1] avoir du pot → fr, avoir du bol → fr, avoir de la veine → fr
pot can be ass.
bol is bowl, luck.
bol in slang can also mean "ass" in the sense of shit-container, as in the case of pot.
but it should be noted that in colloquial French, these idioms no longer have vulgar undertones.
A.
Hen Hanna
2017-04-18 18:57:44 UTC
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Post by Arnaud Fournet
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by wugi
Expression hazards.
***
Schwein haben.
There is a longish joke about a Dutch person learning the meaning of
"Du hast Schwein gehabt" (you have been lucky). Later, at a gala party,
when asked by his host if he's already had a dance with the latter's
"Nein, das Schwein habe ich noch nicht gehabt".
***
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Schwein_haben
Beispiele: [1] Beim Fußballspielen hab ich gestern mächtig Schwein gehabt.
(no i dont have a guess)
Does "das Schwein" always lead to an incorrect use of this idiom?
Italienisch: [1] avere culo → it (wörtlich: Arsch haben)
Französisch: [1] avoir du pot → fr, avoir du bol → fr, avoir de la veine → fr
pot can be ass.
bol is bowl, luck.
bol in slang can also mean "ass" in the sense of shit-container, as in the case of pot.
but it should be noted that in colloquial French, these idioms no longer have vulgar undertones.
A.
C'est dans les vieux pots qu'on fait les meilleures soupes.

I've been wondering. When this proverb is used today,
more than half of the time
does it refers to [sex with older women] ?

HH
Arnaud Fournet
2017-04-18 20:28:42 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Arnaud Fournet
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by wugi
Expression hazards.
***
Schwein haben.
There is a longish joke about a Dutch person learning the meaning of
"Du hast Schwein gehabt" (you have been lucky). Later, at a gala party,
when asked by his host if he's already had a dance with the latter's
"Nein, das Schwein habe ich noch nicht gehabt".
***
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Schwein_haben
Beispiele: [1] Beim Fußballspielen hab ich gestern mächtig Schwein gehabt.
(no i dont have a guess)
Does "das Schwein" always lead to an incorrect use of this idiom?
Italienisch: [1] avere culo → it (wörtlich: Arsch haben)
Französisch: [1] avoir du pot → fr, avoir du bol → fr, avoir de la veine → fr
pot can be ass.
bol is bowl, luck.
bol in slang can also mean "ass" in the sense of shit-container, as in the case of pot.
but it should be noted that in colloquial French, these idioms no longer have vulgar undertones.
A.
C'est dans les vieux pots qu'on fait les meilleures soupes.
I've been wondering. When this proverb is used today,
more than half of the time
does it refers to [sex with older women] ?
IMO, most French people are so brainwashed by USA-made movie-crap that I suppose very few have ever heard that proverb.
This is cultural archeology.
A.
Hen Hanna
2017-04-18 20:46:41 UTC
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Post by Arnaud Fournet
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Arnaud Fournet
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by wugi
Expression hazards.
***
Schwein haben.
There is a longish joke about a Dutch person learning the meaning of
"Du hast Schwein gehabt" (you have been lucky). Later, at a gala party,
when asked by his host if he's already had a dance with the latter's
"Nein, das Schwein habe ich noch nicht gehabt".
***
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Schwein_haben
Beispiele: [1] Beim Fußballspielen hab ich gestern mächtig Schwein gehabt.
(no i dont have a guess)
Does "das Schwein" always lead to an incorrect use of this idiom?
Italienisch: [1] avere culo → it (wörtlich: Arsch haben)
Französisch: [1] avoir du pot → fr, avoir du bol → fr, avoir de la veine → fr
pot can be ass.
bol is bowl, luck.
bol in slang can also mean "ass" in the sense of shit-container, as in the case of pot.
but it should be noted that in colloquial French, these idioms no longer have vulgar undertones.
A.
C'est dans les vieux pots qu'on fait les meilleures soupes.
I've been wondering. When this proverb is used today,
more than half of the time
does it refers to [sex with older women] ?
IMO, most French people are so brainwashed by USA-made movie-crap that I suppose very few have ever heard that proverb.
This is cultural archeology.
A.
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Big_Bang_Theory

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weeds

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Californication_(s%C3%A9rie_t%C3%A9l%C3%A9vis%C3%A9e)

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prison_Break

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breaking_Bad

These are some TV shows I never liked.

You're right -- Apparently the French love this crap.

how depressing.

HH
Arnaud Fournet
2017-04-19 03:52:39 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Arnaud Fournet
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Arnaud Fournet
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by wugi
Expression hazards.
***
Schwein haben.
There is a longish joke about a Dutch person learning the meaning of
"Du hast Schwein gehabt" (you have been lucky). Later, at a gala party,
when asked by his host if he's already had a dance with the latter's
"Nein, das Schwein habe ich noch nicht gehabt".
***
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Schwein_haben
Beispiele: [1] Beim Fußballspielen hab ich gestern mächtig Schwein gehabt.
(no i dont have a guess)
Does "das Schwein" always lead to an incorrect use of this idiom?
Italienisch: [1] avere culo → it (wörtlich: Arsch haben)
Französisch: [1] avoir du pot → fr, avoir du bol → fr, avoir de la veine → fr
pot can be ass.
bol is bowl, luck.
bol in slang can also mean "ass" in the sense of shit-container, as in the case of pot.
but it should be noted that in colloquial French, these idioms no longer have vulgar undertones.
A.
C'est dans les vieux pots qu'on fait les meilleures soupes.
I've been wondering. When this proverb is used today,
more than half of the time
does it refers to [sex with older women] ?
IMO, most French people are so brainwashed by USA-made movie-crap that I suppose very few have ever heard that proverb.
This is cultural archeology.
A.
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Big_Bang_Theory
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weeds
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Californication_(s%C3%A9rie_t%C3%A9l%C3%A9vis%C3%A9e)
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prison_Break
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breaking_Bad
These are some TV shows I never liked.
You're right -- Apparently the French love this crap.
how depressing.
I'm not sure they love it. It's mainstream merdias garbage fed to the plebe.
A.
wugi
2017-04-19 18:50:10 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
Post by wugi
Expression hazards.
***
Schwein haben.
There is a longish joke about a Dutch person learning the meaning of
"Du hast Schwein gehabt" (you have been lucky). Later, at a gala party,
when asked by his host if he's already had a dance with the latter's
"Nein, das Schwein habe ich noch nicht gehabt".
***
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Schwein_haben
Beispiele: [1] Beim Fußballspielen hab ich gestern mächtig Schwein gehabt.
(no i dont have a guess)
Does "das Schwein" always lead to an incorrect use of this idiom?
Yes. I guess it can take an adverb like in your Beispiel.
Perhaps also adjectives of quantity:
? Ich habe sehr viel Schwein gehabt.
? Ich hatte noch nie solches Schwein gehabt.

But with "das" the Schwein gets suddenly 'personalised'!

The joke lies in the mistranslation from Dutch, which in German could be
rendered correctly, I suppose, as
"Nein, das Glück hatte ich noch nicht". No, *that* lucky I haven't been
yet. And then inserting forcedly the Schwein expression.

The expression seems also sensitive to the verb form:
? Du hast nur Schwein. You're merely lucky.
? Solches Schwein hat nur er. Only he would be that lucky.
sound a bit awkward, or do they?
--
guido wugi
Christian Weisgerber
2017-04-19 20:31:07 UTC
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Post by wugi
Yes. I guess it can take an adverb like in your Beispiel.
? Ich habe sehr viel Schwein gehabt.
? Ich hatte noch nie solches Schwein gehabt.
Those work for me. Also:
Er hat so ein Schwein gehabt!
Post by wugi
? Du hast nur Schwein. You're merely lucky.
Actually, my first thought was "you are always lucky". We may be
entering modal particle territory here. It probably depends on the
stress when spoken.
Post by wugi
? Solches Schwein hat nur er. Only he would be that lucky.
sound a bit awkward, or do they?
I think "so ein Schwein" is more common than "solches Schwein".
--
Christian "naddy" Weisgerber ***@mips.inka.de
wugi
2017-04-30 20:39:29 UTC
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Post by Christian Weisgerber
Post by wugi
Yes. I guess it can take an adverb like in your Beispiel.
? Ich habe sehr viel Schwein gehabt.
? Ich hatte noch nie solches Schwein gehabt.
Er hat so ein Schwein gehabt!
Post by wugi
? Du hast nur Schwein. You're merely lucky.
Actually, my first thought was "you are always lucky". We may be
Yes, could also be :-)
Post by Christian Weisgerber
entering modal particle territory here. It probably depends on the
stress when spoken.
I would think, rather on the circumstances.
Post by Christian Weisgerber
Post by wugi
? Solches Schwein hat nur er. Only he would be that lucky.
sound a bit awkward, or do they?
I think "so ein Schwein" is more common than "solches Schwein".
BTW my Dutch "collegues" in nl.taal would reprove my Flemish expressions
like "zo'n zaken" as non-standard, having to be "zulke zaken".
A while ago while watching a Krimi on German television, with subtitles
because otherwise missing a lot of subtleties, I read sth like "solche
Sachen" but I heard clearly sth like "so'n Sachen". Is this possible in
"standard" speech, or else, is it common colloquial, or regional?
--
guido wugi
Ruud Harmsen
2017-04-30 21:27:58 UTC
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Post by wugi
BTW my Dutch "collegues" in nl.taal would reprove my Flemish expressions
like "zo'n zaken" as non-standard, having to be "zulke zaken".
A while ago while watching a Krimi on German television, with subtitles
because otherwise missing a lot of subtleties, I read sth like "solche
Sachen" but I heard clearly sth like "so'n Sachen". Is this possible in
"standard" speech, or else, is it common colloquial, or regional?
Das sind so Sachen die ich auch nicht weiß.
--
Ruud Harmsen, http://rudhar.com
Christian Weisgerber
2017-05-01 15:10:23 UTC
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Post by wugi
A while ago while watching a Krimi on German television, with subtitles
because otherwise missing a lot of subtleties, I read sth like "solche
Sachen" but I heard clearly sth like "so'n Sachen". Is this possible in
"standard" speech, or else, is it common colloquial, or regional?
Seems odd on its own like that; I can't really tell without more
context.
--
Christian "naddy" Weisgerber ***@mips.inka.de
wugi
2017-05-01 16:50:51 UTC
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Post by Christian Weisgerber
Post by wugi
A while ago while watching a Krimi on German television, with subtitles
because otherwise missing a lot of subtleties, I read sth like "solche
Sachen" but I heard clearly sth like "so'n Sachen". Is this possible in
"standard" speech, or else, is it common colloquial, or regional?
Seems odd on its own like that; I can't really tell without more
context.
I'm only not sure if it wasn't rather "so ein Sachen", or "so 'ne
Sachen". But it definitely sounded singular-with-plural.
--
guido wugi
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